Brain  Crist

Brain Crist

1597813200

Azure Event Grid — Digested

Like any beast in Azure, learning about Event Grid quickly turns into a game of buzzword bingo. Lots of new words that actually represent something rather simple that, especially if you know something about messaging, you might even already understand.

After going through the headache of digesting these new terms and concepts I always like to reflect on what the overall concept actually is in simpler terms.

What is Event Grid?

Event Grid is a message router, and not much more. It knows how to consume events and distribute them to interested parties.

It’s actually like newsletter distribution. Imagine you want your newsletters published. You give over a copy of each to the distributor, they know who the subscribers are and how to send copies to each one. It doesn’t matter if a subscriber lives locally or overseas, that is the distributor’s concern.

In Event Grid this distributor is called a topic. The topic knows who to send events to via subscriptions_. _The subscriptions define who’s interested in receiving events and where they are.

From a publisher’s perspective, they simply send the events to the topic, without caring who the subscribers are.

Why use it?

Microsoft has great documentation helping you choose between messaging services that Azure provides.

Personally, I think the biggest benefit of Event Grid is its simplicity and cross-platform support.

Keeping it simple

A lot of messaging services provide heaps of functionality you may not need. Heck, look at just some of the Advanced Features that Service Bus offers:

Message sessions, Autoforwarding, Dead-letter queue, Scheduled delivery, Message deferral, Batching, Transactions, Filtering and action, Autodelete on idle, Duplicate detection, Geo-disaster recovery

#azure-event-grid #event-driven-architecture #microservices #azure

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Azure Event Grid — Digested
Ron  Cartwright

Ron Cartwright

1600624800

Getting Started With Azure Event Grid Viewer

In the last article, we had a look at how to start with Azure DevOps: Getting Started With Audit Streaming With Event Grid

In the article, we will go to the next step to create a subscription and use webhook event handlers to view those logs in our Azure web application.

#cloud #tutorial #azure #event driven architecture #realtime #signalr #webhook #azure web services #azure event grid #azure #azure event grid #serverless architecture #application integration

Azure Series #2: Single Server Deployment (Input)

In the previous article, we discussed the Gateway to your single server deployment (example: webserver). In this section, we shall continue with Input and Core Infrastructure.

Input for single-server deployment

When you talk about Data for your organization, it covers all three things, “People, Process, and Technology”. More details for the “Streaming and Sourcing Layer” can be found in a separate section (will update the link soon).

**_People: The Who. _**Producers and Consumers of data.

**_Process: The How. _**How the data is curated and put to use.

**_Technology: The What: _**What technologies are used to fetch, process, pass on and store.

Data: While People, Process and Technology is the golden triangle, if you think about it, the very reason the entire state-of-the-art ecosystem exists is merely to get the raw data to a usable form.

1. Data catalog

Any great state-of-art ecosystem is a waste if the data in need for consumers cannot be discovered and from the Producers side, if data cannot be documented/tagged properly that makes it useable for the consumers or end-users. Azure Data Catalog helps to bridge this gap of making the data correctly discoverable by fixing the traditional problems for both consumers and producers and also helps organizations to get the best value out of their existing information assets.

2. Streaming

While we will discuss more as part of the sourcing section, we shall cover the basics of streaming.

1/ Queue Storage

2/ Service Bus

3/ Event Hubs

4/ Event Grid

#azure-interview #azure-event-grid #azure-event-hub #azure #azure-service-bus

Brain  Crist

Brain Crist

1597813200

Azure Event Grid — Digested

Like any beast in Azure, learning about Event Grid quickly turns into a game of buzzword bingo. Lots of new words that actually represent something rather simple that, especially if you know something about messaging, you might even already understand.

After going through the headache of digesting these new terms and concepts I always like to reflect on what the overall concept actually is in simpler terms.

What is Event Grid?

Event Grid is a message router, and not much more. It knows how to consume events and distribute them to interested parties.

It’s actually like newsletter distribution. Imagine you want your newsletters published. You give over a copy of each to the distributor, they know who the subscribers are and how to send copies to each one. It doesn’t matter if a subscriber lives locally or overseas, that is the distributor’s concern.

In Event Grid this distributor is called a topic. The topic knows who to send events to via subscriptions_. _The subscriptions define who’s interested in receiving events and where they are.

From a publisher’s perspective, they simply send the events to the topic, without caring who the subscribers are.

Why use it?

Microsoft has great documentation helping you choose between messaging services that Azure provides.

Personally, I think the biggest benefit of Event Grid is its simplicity and cross-platform support.

Keeping it simple

A lot of messaging services provide heaps of functionality you may not need. Heck, look at just some of the Advanced Features that Service Bus offers:

Message sessions, Autoforwarding, Dead-letter queue, Scheduled delivery, Message deferral, Batching, Transactions, Filtering and action, Autodelete on idle, Duplicate detection, Geo-disaster recovery

#azure-event-grid #event-driven-architecture #microservices #azure

Tamale  Moses

Tamale Moses

1624867800

Digital event: Extend to the cloud with Azure VMware solution

Find out how to easily shift your VMware workloads to the cloud on your own terms and modernize your investments. Join us on March 23, 2021, from 9:00 AM to 10:30 AM Pacific Time (UTC-8), for the Extend to the Cloud with Azure VMware Solution digital event—delivered in partnership with Intel and VMware—and get to know Microsoft Azure VMware Solution: a cloud service that lets you run VMware natively on Azure.

Join industry experts and VMware users at this free digital event to:

  • Learn how to cost-effectively shift your VMware workloads, skills, and tools to the cloud.
  • Find out how to optimize and scale your Microsoft Windows and SQL Server workloads on Azure.
  • See demos of Azure VMware Solution in action and hear about new and upcoming product features.
  • Join interactive and technical sessions on deployment, migration, disaster recovery, and connecting to other Azure services.
  • Plus, ask the experts your questions and network with your peers in the live chat and moderated roundtables.

We have a fantastic line-up of speakers and sessions for you at this event to help you learn how to easily shift your VMware workloads to the cloud on your own terms

#virtual machines #events #azure vmware solution #digital event #azure #azure vmware

Eric  Bukenya

Eric Bukenya

1624713540

Learn NoSQL in Azure: Diving Deeper into Azure Cosmos DB

This article is a part of the series – Learn NoSQL in Azure where we explore Azure Cosmos DB as a part of the non-relational database system used widely for a variety of applications. Azure Cosmos DB is a part of Microsoft’s serverless databases on Azure which is highly scalable and distributed across all locations that run on Azure. It is offered as a platform as a service (PAAS) from Azure and you can develop databases that have a very high throughput and very low latency. Using Azure Cosmos DB, customers can replicate their data across multiple locations across the globe and also across multiple locations within the same region. This makes Cosmos DB a highly available database service with almost 99.999% availability for reads and writes for multi-region modes and almost 99.99% availability for single-region modes.

In this article, we will focus more on how Azure Cosmos DB works behind the scenes and how can you get started with it using the Azure Portal. We will also explore how Cosmos DB is priced and understand the pricing model in detail.

How Azure Cosmos DB works

As already mentioned, Azure Cosmos DB is a multi-modal NoSQL database service that is geographically distributed across multiple Azure locations. This helps customers to deploy the databases across multiple locations around the globe. This is beneficial as it helps to reduce the read latency when the users use the application.

As you can see in the figure above, Azure Cosmos DB is distributed across the globe. Let’s suppose you have a web application that is hosted in India. In that case, the NoSQL database in India will be considered as the master database for writes and all the other databases can be considered as a read replicas. Whenever new data is generated, it is written to the database in India first and then it is synchronized with the other databases.

Consistency Levels

While maintaining data over multiple regions, the most common challenge is the latency as when the data is made available to the other databases. For example, when data is written to the database in India, users from India will be able to see that data sooner than users from the US. This is due to the latency in synchronization between the two regions. In order to overcome this, there are a few modes that customers can choose from and define how often or how soon they want their data to be made available in the other regions. Azure Cosmos DB offers five levels of consistency which are as follows:

  • Strong
  • Bounded staleness
  • Session
  • Consistent prefix
  • Eventual

In most common NoSQL databases, there are only two levels – Strong and EventualStrong being the most consistent level while Eventual is the least. However, as we move from Strong to Eventual, consistency decreases but availability and throughput increase. This is a trade-off that customers need to decide based on the criticality of their applications. If you want to read in more detail about the consistency levels, the official guide from Microsoft is the easiest to understand. You can refer to it here.

Azure Cosmos DB Pricing Model

Now that we have some idea about working with the NoSQL database – Azure Cosmos DB on Azure, let us try to understand how the database is priced. In order to work with any cloud-based services, it is essential that you have a sound knowledge of how the services are charged, otherwise, you might end up paying something much higher than your expectations.

If you browse to the pricing page of Azure Cosmos DB, you can see that there are two modes in which the database services are billed.

  • Database Operations – Whenever you execute or run queries against your NoSQL database, there are some resources being used. Azure terms these usages in terms of Request Units or RU. The amount of RU consumed per second is aggregated and billed
  • Consumed Storage – As you start storing data in your database, it will take up some space in order to store that data. This storage is billed per the standard SSD-based storage across any Azure locations globally

Let’s learn about this in more detail.

#azure #azure cosmos db #nosql #azure #nosql in azure #azure cosmos db