Hunter  Krajcik

Hunter Krajcik

1617291300

Terraform: Serverless Kubernetes Cluster with AWS EKS

Running Pods on Fargate with EKS and exposing them for the outside world using Terraform.

WS Fargate is a serverless compute engine for containers that works with both Amazon Elastic Container Service (ECS) and Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS). Fargate makes it easy for you to focus on building your applications. Fargate removes the need to provision and manage servers, lets you specify and pay for resources per application, and improves security through application isolation by design.

Today’s world is all about Agile and Automation and we are moving towards new trends like Serverless. So, this article is full of automation and explains everything from serverless to securing the Database, from testing to production environments and code management.

This article explains that how you can host your own web application like WordPress, Owncloud, etc. on AWS Fargate(serverless) by setting up a Kubernetes Cluster with EKS. And for doing this setup we will use Terraform which is an IaC tool. But if you are not familiar with terraform then you can refer my this article.

Get the complete code from here, so that you can follow along with the article

Project Description

In this article, we will first create the Network setup like VPC, Subnets, etc. for the EKS Cluster. Then, we will create an EKS Cluster with a managed Node Group and a Fargate Profile. Next, we will launch a Kubernetes Deployment for our web app i.e., WordPress on Fargate, and also create a PVC (Persistent Volume Claim) for the Deployment. And to access the app we will also create a Load Balancer type Service in Kubernetes. Last we create a Database for our web app.

In this complete setup, we will use Terraform to automate our work. And at last, I will show you an interesting thing i.e., Code Management by creating our own Terraform modules. And will structure our code in such a way that the same code can be used to setup both Testing and Production environments with just one command.

In this article, I have tried to show you almost everything from scratch and I believe you will find some interesting and important concepts related to Terraform and AWS:)

#kubernetes #terraform #aws #serverless

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Terraform: Serverless Kubernetes Cluster with AWS EKS
Christa  Stehr

Christa Stehr

1602964260

50+ Useful Kubernetes Tools for 2020 - Part 2

Introduction

Last year, we provided a list of Kubernetes tools that proved so popular we have decided to curate another list of some useful additions for working with the platform—among which are many tools that we personally use here at Caylent. Check out the original tools list here in case you missed it.

According to a recent survey done by Stackrox, the dominance Kubernetes enjoys in the market continues to be reinforced, with 86% of respondents using it for container orchestration.

(State of Kubernetes and Container Security, 2020)

And as you can see below, more and more companies are jumping into containerization for their apps. If you’re among them, here are some tools to aid you going forward as Kubernetes continues its rapid growth.

(State of Kubernetes and Container Security, 2020)

#blog #tools #amazon elastic kubernetes service #application security #aws kms #botkube #caylent #cli #container monitoring #container orchestration tools #container security #containers #continuous delivery #continuous deployment #continuous integration #contour #developers #development #developments #draft #eksctl #firewall #gcp #github #harbor #helm #helm charts #helm-2to3 #helm-aws-secret-plugin #helm-docs #helm-operator-get-started #helm-secrets #iam #json #k-rail #k3s #k3sup #k8s #keel.sh #keycloak #kiali #kiam #klum #knative #krew #ksniff #kube #kube-prod-runtime #kube-ps1 #kube-scan #kube-state-metrics #kube2iam #kubeapps #kubebuilder #kubeconfig #kubectl #kubectl-aws-secrets #kubefwd #kubernetes #kubernetes command line tool #kubernetes configuration #kubernetes deployment #kubernetes in development #kubernetes in production #kubernetes ingress #kubernetes interfaces #kubernetes monitoring #kubernetes networking #kubernetes observability #kubernetes plugins #kubernetes secrets #kubernetes security #kubernetes security best practices #kubernetes security vendors #kubernetes service discovery #kubernetic #kubesec #kubeterminal #kubeval #kudo #kuma #microsoft azure key vault #mozilla sops #octant #octarine #open source #palo alto kubernetes security #permission-manager #pgp #rafay #rakess #rancher #rook #secrets operations #serverless function #service mesh #shell-operator #snyk #snyk container #sonobuoy #strongdm #tcpdump #tenkai #testing #tigera #tilt #vert.x #wireshark #yaml

AWS Fargate for Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service | Caylent

On-demand cloud computing brings new ways to ensure scalability and efficiency. Rather than pre-allocating and managing certain server resources or having to go through the usual process of setting up a cloud cluster, apps and microservices can now rely on on-demand serverless computing blocks designed to be efficient and highly optimized.

Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS) already makes running Kubernetes on AWS very easy. Support for AWS Fargate, which introduces the on-demand serverless computing element to the environment, makes deploying Kubernetes pods even easier and more efficient. AWS Fargate offers a wide range of features that make managing clusters and pods intuitive.

Utilizing Fargate
As with many other AWS services, using Fargate to manage Kubernetes clusters is very easy to do. To integrate Fargate and run a cluster on top of it, you only need to add the command –fargate to the end of your eksctl command.

EKS automatically configures the cluster to run on Fargate. It creates a pod execution role so that pod creation and management can be automated in an on-demand environment. It also patches coredns so the cluster can run smoothly on Fargate.

A Fargate profile is automatically created by the command. You can choose to customize the profile later or configure namespaces yourself, but the default profile is suitable for a wide range of applications already, requiring no human input other than a namespace for the cluster.

There are some prerequisites to keep in mind though. For starters, Fargate requires eksctl version 0.20.0 or later. Fargate also comes with some limitations, starting with support for only a handful of regions. For example, Fargate doesn’t support stateful apps, DaemonSets or privileged containers at the moment. Check out this link for Fargate limitations for your consideration.

Support for conventional load balancing is also limited, which is why ALB Ingress Controller is recommended. At the time of this writing, Classic Load Balancers and Network Load Balancers are not supported yet.

However, you can still be very meticulous in how you manage your clusters, including using different clusters to separate trusted and untrusted workloads.

Everything else is straightforward. Once the cluster is created, you can begin specifying pod execution roles for Fargate. You have the ability to use IAM console to create a role and assign it to a Fargate cluster. Or you can also create IAM roles and Fargate profiles via Terraform.

#aws #blog #amazon eks #aws fargate #aws management console #aws services #kubernetes #kubernetes clusters #kubernetes deployment #kubernetes pods

Hunter  Krajcik

Hunter Krajcik

1617291300

Terraform: Serverless Kubernetes Cluster with AWS EKS

Running Pods on Fargate with EKS and exposing them for the outside world using Terraform.

WS Fargate is a serverless compute engine for containers that works with both Amazon Elastic Container Service (ECS) and Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS). Fargate makes it easy for you to focus on building your applications. Fargate removes the need to provision and manage servers, lets you specify and pay for resources per application, and improves security through application isolation by design.

Today’s world is all about Agile and Automation and we are moving towards new trends like Serverless. So, this article is full of automation and explains everything from serverless to securing the Database, from testing to production environments and code management.

This article explains that how you can host your own web application like WordPress, Owncloud, etc. on AWS Fargate(serverless) by setting up a Kubernetes Cluster with EKS. And for doing this setup we will use Terraform which is an IaC tool. But if you are not familiar with terraform then you can refer my this article.

Get the complete code from here, so that you can follow along with the article

Project Description

In this article, we will first create the Network setup like VPC, Subnets, etc. for the EKS Cluster. Then, we will create an EKS Cluster with a managed Node Group and a Fargate Profile. Next, we will launch a Kubernetes Deployment for our web app i.e., WordPress on Fargate, and also create a PVC (Persistent Volume Claim) for the Deployment. And to access the app we will also create a Load Balancer type Service in Kubernetes. Last we create a Database for our web app.

In this complete setup, we will use Terraform to automate our work. And at last, I will show you an interesting thing i.e., Code Management by creating our own Terraform modules. And will structure our code in such a way that the same code can be used to setup both Testing and Production environments with just one command.

In this article, I have tried to show you almost everything from scratch and I believe you will find some interesting and important concepts related to Terraform and AWS:)

#kubernetes #terraform #aws #serverless

Rory  West

Rory West

1624978200

Deploying AWS EKS Cluster With Terraform

Let’s first talk about :

What is Elastic Kubernetes Service (Amazon EKS)

Fully managed Kubernetes control plane

Amazon EKS is a managed service that makes it easy for you to use Kubernetes on AWS without needing to install and operate your own Kubernetes control plane.

How it works

Amazon EKS exposes a Kubernetes API endpoint. Your existing Kubernetes tooling can connect directly to EKS managed control plane. Worker nodes run as EC2 instances in your account.

#containers #aws #terraform #kubernetes #aws eks

How to Use AWS IAM Role on AWS EKS PODs

A native-AWS way to attach an IAM role into the Kubernetes POD, without third-party software, reducing latency and improving your EKS security.

How It Works

It’s possible to attach an IAM role in a Kubernetes POD without using third-party software, such as kube2iam and kiam. This is thanks to the integration between AWS IAM and Kubernetes ServiceAccount, following the approach of IAM Roles for Service Accounts (IRSA).


Benefits

There are quite a few benefits of using IRSA with Kubernetes PODs.

  • Granular restriction (per cluster, per namespace, etc.).
  • It’s also possible to not use it.
  • More flexible than the other tools.
  • One less point of failure (maybe a few less).
  • Lesser resource consumption.
  • More pods per node.
  • Latency may reduce by ~50ms.
  • Especially for the first request.
  • Prevent issues with caching the credentials.
  • This software takes a few minutes to update its cache.
  • Better auditing.
  • Instead of checking the logs of kube2iam/kiam pods, you can check AWS CloudTrails.
  • Easier to set up.
  • AWS provides full support.

Pre-requirements

There are a few pre-requirements that you’ll need to attempt in order to use the IAM role in a POD.

  • An IAM OpenID Connect provider pointing to the AWS EKS OpenID Connect provider URL.
  • AWS EKS cluster 1.13 or above.
  • A trust relationship between your IAM Role and the OpenID Provider.

#cloud #tutorial #aws #kubernetes #cloud security #k8s #eks #aws security #kubernetes security #aws iam