John David

John David

1669020413

Dagger: An Open-source Devkit for CI/CD

Dagger is an open-source devkit for CI/CD. It works using Cue, a powerful configuration language made by Google that helps to validate and define text-based and dynamic configurations. 

What is Dagger?

Dagger is a programmable CI/CD engine that runs your pipelines in containers.

Programmable

Develop your CI/CD pipelines as code, in the same programming language as your application.

Runs your pipelines in containers

Dagger executes your pipelines entirely as standard OCI containers. This has several benefits:

  • Instant local testing
  • Portability: the same pipeline can run on your local machine, a CI runner, a dedicated server, or any container hosting service.
  • Superior caching: every operation is cached by default, and caching works the same everywhere
  • Compatibility with the Docker ecosystem: if it runs in a container, you can add it to your pipeline.
  • Cross-language instrumentation: teams can use each other's tools without learning each other's language.

Who is it for?

Dagger may be a good fit if you are...

  • A developer wishing your CI pipelines were code instead of YAML
  • Your team's "designated devops person", hoping to replace a pile of artisanal scripts with something more powerful
  • A platform engineer writing custom tooling, with the goal of unifying continuous delivery across organizational silos
  • A cloud-native developer advocate or solutions engineer, looking to demonstrate a complex integration on short notice

Learn more

Download Details: 
Author: dagger
Source Code: https://github.com/dagger/dagger 
License: Apache-2.0
#dagger #docker 

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Buddha Community

Dagger: An Open-source Devkit for CI/CD
Matt  Towne

Matt Towne

1589791867

Serverless CI/CD on the AWS Cloud

CI/CD pipelines have long played a major role in speeding up the development and deployment of cloud-native apps. Cloud services like AWS lend themselves to more agile deployment through the services they offer as well as approaches such as Infrastructure as Code. There is no shortage of tools to help you manage your CI/CD pipeline as well.

While the majority of development teams have streamlined their pipelines to take full advantage of cloud-native features, there is still so much that can be done to refine CI/CD even further. The entire pipeline can now be built as code and managed either via Git as a single source of truth or by using visual tools to help guide the process.

The entire process can be fully automated. Even better, it can be made serverless, which allows the CI/CD pipeline to operate with immense efficiency. Git branches can even be utilized as a base for multiple pipelines. Thanks to the three tools from Amazon; AWS CodeCommit, AWS CodeBuild, and AWS CodeDeploy, serverless CI/CD on the AWS cloud is now easy to set up.

#aws #aws codebuild #aws codecommit #aws codedeploy #cd #cd pipeline #ci #ci/cd processes #ci/cd workflow #serverless

Tyrique  Littel

Tyrique Littel

1598461200

An Open-Source Book About the Open Source World

Open source today is a word that often include a lot of things, such as open knowledge (Wikimedia projects), open hardware (Arduino, Raspberry Pi), open formats (ODT/ODS/ODP) and so on.

It is a world of opportunities that can be difficult for newcomers but also for intermediates. This article will help you discover how to approach specific roles, activities or projects/communities in the best way.

Everything Started with “Coaching for OpenSource Communities 2.0”

I decided to write a book in my personal style about my experience in the last 7 to 8 years in open source. I was surprised when I reached 100 pages about various different topics.

My idea was to write something that I would like to read, so nothing that is boring or complicated, but full of real facts.

The second goal was to include my experience but also my philosophy on contributing and how I contribute daily.

Thirdly, I wanted to give a lot of hints and resources and an overall view of this open source world.

Basically, I wanted to write something different from self-help or coaching books that includes just a list of suggestions and best practices. Instead, I take real examples from real life about the OSS world.

As a contributor and developer, I prefer to have real cases to study, because best practices are useful, but we need to learn from others and this world is full of good and bad cases to discover.

In 2019, I started writing a book after Fosdem 2019 and after 2 years inside the Mozilla Reps Council. In that Fosdem edition, I had a talk “Coaching for Open Source Communities 2.0” and after the feedback at the conference and my thoughts in various roles, activities, and projects, it was time to write something.

At the end it wasn’t a manual but a book that included my experience, learnings, best practices and so on in Localization, Development, Project Maintainer, Sysadmin, Community Management, Mentor, Speaker and so on. It contains the following sections:

  • Biography - This choice isn’t for self promotion but just to understand my point of view and my story that can be inspiring for others
  • Philosophy - Not the usual description of Open Source or the 4 freedoms, but just what Open Source means and how you can help
  • How to live inside the Open Source - A discovery about communications and tools, understanding the various kind of people and the best way to talk with your community
  • How to choose a project - Starting with some questions to yourself and how to involve more people in your project
  • The activity - Open Source is based on tasks that can be divided in 2 levels: Support, Testing, Marketing, Development etc
  • How to use your time - We are busy, we have a life, a job and a family but Open Source can be time-consuming
  • Why document is important - How writing documentation can be healthy for your community and the project’s future and brand

There are also three appendices that are manuals which I wrote throughout the years and gathered and improved for this book. They are about: community management, public speaking, and mentoring.

The book ends with my point of view about the future and what we have to do to change opinions about those topics.

I wrote this book and published in October 2019, but it was only possible with the help of reviews and localizers that improved and contributed. Yes, because this book is open source and free for everyone.

I picked the GPL license because this license changed the world and my life in the best way. Using this license is just a tribute. This decision usually is not clear because after all this is a book and there are better licenses like Creative Commons.

#open-source #contributing-to-open-source #programming #software-development #development #coding #books #open-source-software

Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1623348300

Top 8 Java Open Source Projects You Should Get Your Hands-on [2021]

Learning about Java is no easy feat. It’s a prevalent and in-demand programming language with applications in numerous sectors. We all know that if you want to learn a new skill, the best way to do so is through using it. That’s why we recommend working on projects.

So if you’re a Java student, then you’ve come to the right place as this article will help you learn about the most popular Java open source projects. This way, you’d have a firm grasp of industry trends and the programming language’s applications.

However, before we discuss its various projects, it’s crucial to examine the place where you can get those projects – GitHub. Let’s begin.

#full stack development #java open source projects #java projects #open source projects #top 8 java open source projects #java open source projects

Mikel  Okuneva

Mikel Okuneva

1602316366

GitHub Demo Days - Using GitHub Actions for testing cloud native applications

What makes a project successful? For developers building cloud-native applications, successful projects thrive on transparent, consistent, and rigorous collaboration. That collaboration is one of the reasons that many open source projects, like Docker containers and Kubernetes, grow to become standards for how we build, deliver, and operate software. Our Open Source Guides and Introduction to innersourcing are great first steps to setting up and encouraging these best practices in your own projects.

However, a common challenge that application developers face is manually testing against inconsistent environments. Accurately testing Kubernetes applications can differ from one developer’s environment to another, and implementing a rigorous and consistent environment for end-to-end testing isn’t easy. It can also be very time consuming to spin up and down Kubernetes clusters. The inconsistencies between environments and the time required to spin up new Kubernetes clusters can negatively impact the speed and quality of cloud-native applications.

Building a transparent CI process

On GitHub, integration and testing becomes a little easier by combining GitHub Actions with open source tools. You can treat Actions as the native continuous integration and continuous delivery (CI/CD) tool for your project, and customize your Actions workflow to include automation and validation as next steps.

Since Actions can be triggered based on nearly any GitHub event, it’s also possible to build in accountability for updating tests and fixing bugs. For example, when a developer creates a pull request, Actions status checks can automatically block the merge if the test fails.

Here are a few more examples:

#engineering #enterprise #events #open source #actions #ci/cd #cloud native applications #cloud native architecture #devops #devops ci/cd #github actions #kubernetes #open source

Houston  Sipes

Houston Sipes

1600992000

Did Google Open Sourcing Kubernetes Backfired?

Over the last few years, Kubernetes have become the de-facto standard for container orchestration and has also won the race against Docker for being the most loved platforms among developers. Released in 2014, Kubernetes has come a long way with currently being used across the entire cloudscape platforms. In fact, recent reports state that out of 109 tools to manage containers, 89% of them are leveraging Kubernetes versions.

Although inspired by Borg, Kubernetes, is an open-source project by Google, and has been donated to a vendor-neutral firm — The Cloud Native Computing Foundation. This could be attributed to Google’s vision of creating a platform that can be used by every firm of the world, including the large tech companies and can host multiple cloud platforms and data centres. The entire reason for handing over the control to CNCF is to develop the platform in the best interest of its users without vendor lock-in.

#opinions #google open source #google open source tools #google opening kubernetes #kubernetes #kubernetes platform #kubernetes tools #open source kubernetes backfired