Event-Driven Microservices, the Sense, the Non-sense and a Way Forward

Microservices, and especially their Event-Driven variants, are at the very peak of the hypecycle and, according to some, on their way down. Meanwhile, a large number of success stories and failures have been shared about this architectural style. How do we ensure that we don’t throw away the baby with the bath water and end up re-inventing the same concepts again a decade from now?

What will the audience learn from this talk?
In this talk, I want to zoom in on different aspects around microservices. What are the promises made and how did it deliver on those? How did technology surrounding microservices evolve and impact our decisions?

Lastly, I will look forward. How can we be pragmatic about microservices, avoiding some of the common pitfalls and helping ensure ourselves that we get the promised benefits, but without the pain.

#Microservices

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Event-Driven Microservices, the Sense, the Non-sense and a Way Forward

Event-Driven Microservices, the Sense, the Non-sense and a Way Forward

Microservices, and especially their Event-Driven variants, are at the very peak of the hypecycle and, according to some, on their way down. Meanwhile, a large number of success stories and failures have been shared about this architectural style. How do we ensure that we don’t throw away the baby with the bath water and end up re-inventing the same concepts again a decade from now?

What will the audience learn from this talk?
In this talk, I want to zoom in on different aspects around microservices. What are the promises made and how did it deliver on those? How did technology surrounding microservices evolve and impact our decisions?

Lastly, I will look forward. How can we be pragmatic about microservices, avoiding some of the common pitfalls and helping ensure ourselves that we get the promised benefits, but without the pain.

#Microservices

Code007 ™

Code007 ™

1573867702

Event-Driven Microservices, the Sense, the Non-sense and a Way Forward

Microservices, and especially their Event-Driven variants, are at the very peak of the hypecycle and, according to some, on their way down. Meanwhile, a large number of success stories and failures have been shared about this architectural style. How do we ensure that we don’t throw away the baby with the bath water and end up re-inventing the same concepts again a decade from now?

What will the audience learn from this talk?
In this talk, I want to zoom in on different aspects around microservices. What are the promises made and how did it deliver on those? How did technology surrounding microservices evolve and impact our decisions?

Lastly, I will look forward. How can we be pragmatic about microservices, avoiding some of the common pitfalls and helping ensure ourselves that we get the promised benefits, but without the pain.

Allard Buijze - Creator of Axon Framework

#microservices

Oral  Brekke

Oral Brekke

1621848840

How to Choreoghraph Event-Driven Microservices

Are you trying to claw your way out of the web of API calls that ties your microservices together? Does a seemingly innocent change or bug fix result in a ripple effect across several business serving capabilities? Well, you’re not alone.

Microservices have been gaining steam since their introduction as an architectural style in 2011. Initially pioneered by companies like Amazon and Netflix as an alternative to their exploding monolithic codebases, they are now increasingly popular even at companies operating at a much smaller scale than the behemoths. And with good reason. When designed well, microservices are a great alternative to the problems often seen with their monolithic counterparts. The key phrase there though is “when designed well”. It’s simple enough when you have ten microservices - so scalable, such fun! But when those quickly grow to 50, and then 100, and then 500, you have a real problem on hand if you haven’t paid attention to how they all talk to each other.

Imagine you have several microservices all communicating via API calls. In this web of tightly coupled services, changes to one service may necessitate corresponding changes across multiple other services, and scaling one service would necessitate scaling a number of others as well. This problem was first described as the Death Star Architecture.

In the world of microservices, Death Star architecture is an anti-pattern where poorly designed microservices become highly interdependent, forming a complex network of interservice communication. When this happens, the entire thing becomes slow, inflexible, and fragile – and easy to blow up. ( ref .)

At this point, you’ve lost many of the benefits of having microservices in the first place, and in reality, are left with a distributed monolith

So how do you avoid the Death Star Architecture trap and allow your microservices to scale? How do you keep your microservice relatively isolated but still remain an integral node in the set of business flows that it serves? Enter the Event-Driven Microservice Architecture. The golden rule of Event-Driven microservices is that all communication is asynchronous. No API calls for us! Microservices instead publish records of their doings, also known as events. An Event is a record of a business action and must contain all information relevant to that action. Events are published to messaging infrastructure (think Kafka, RabbitMQ) and it is left to consuming microservices to figure out how to operate on them. By removing this tight coupling between services, it’s possible to truly reap the benefits offered by the microservices architecture pattern.

Event-Driven Messaging comes in two flavors - choreography and orchestration.

What is the choreography pattern?

Choreography is pretty much what it sounds like! Each dancer in a ballet troupe knows their position and performs their routine based on musical cues. Choreographed microservices behave in the same way - each service (dancer) is aware of it’s place in the business flow and acts on certain cues (events).

Let’s look at a simplified example of an order processing flow. The customer completes checking out their cart and the following steps need to happen next

  1. An order needs to be created
  2. An email with the details of the order needs to be sent to the customer
  3. Inventory needs to be decreased
  4. A hold needs to be placed on the customer’s credit card

#event-driven #microservices #microservice-architecture #scaling

studio52 dubai

studio52 dubai

1621850716

7 Tips for a Successful Live Event Coverage - Studio 52

Live events have been a growing trend in the events industry this past year, offering many businesses a much-needed lifeline. Read on for our simple tips to planning your virtual event

#event coverage services #event photography #event video production #event videography #event coverage services #event photography

Einar  Hintz

Einar Hintz

1599055326

Testing Microservices Applications

The shift towards microservices and modular applications makes testing more important and more challenging at the same time. You have to make sure that the microservices running in containers perform well and as intended, but you can no longer rely on conventional testing strategies to get the job done.

This is where new testing approaches are needed. Testing your microservices applications require the right approach, a suitable set of tools, and immense attention to details. This article will guide you through the process of testing your microservices and talk about the challenges you will have to overcome along the way. Let’s get started, shall we?

A Brave New World

Traditionally, testing a monolith application meant configuring a test environment and setting up all of the application components in a way that matched the production environment. It took time to set up the testing environment, and there were a lot of complexities around the process.

Testing also requires the application to run in full. It is not possible to test monolith apps on a per-component basis, mainly because there is usually a base code that ties everything together, and the app is designed to run as a complete app to work properly.

Microservices running in containers offer one particular advantage: universal compatibility. You don’t have to match the testing environment with the deployment architecture exactly, and you can get away with testing individual components rather than the full app in some situations.

Of course, you will have to embrace the new cloud-native approach across the pipeline. Rather than creating critical dependencies between microservices, you need to treat each one as a semi-independent module.

The only monolith or centralized portion of the application is the database, but this too is an easy challenge to overcome. As long as you have a persistent database running on your test environment, you can perform tests at any time.

Keep in mind that there are additional things to focus on when testing microservices.

  • Microservices rely on network communications to talk to each other, so network reliability and requirements must be part of the testing.
  • Automation and infrastructure elements are now added as codes, and you have to make sure that they also run properly when microservices are pushed through the pipeline
  • While containerization is universal, you still have to pay attention to specific dependencies and create a testing strategy that allows for those dependencies to be included

Test containers are the method of choice for many developers. Unlike monolith apps, which lets you use stubs and mocks for testing, microservices need to be tested in test containers. Many CI/CD pipelines actually integrate production microservices as part of the testing process.

Contract Testing as an Approach

As mentioned before, there are many ways to test microservices effectively, but the one approach that developers now use reliably is contract testing. Loosely coupled microservices can be tested in an effective and efficient way using contract testing, mainly because this testing approach focuses on contracts; in other words, it focuses on how components or microservices communicate with each other.

Syntax and semantics construct how components communicate with each other. By defining syntax and semantics in a standardized way and testing microservices based on their ability to generate the right message formats and meet behavioral expectations, you can rest assured knowing that the microservices will behave as intended when deployed.

#testing #software testing #test automation #microservice architecture #microservice #test #software test automation #microservice best practices #microservice deployment #microservice components