Stream-spigot: Streams2 Readable Stream Generator, Useful for Testing

Stream Spigot

A generator for (streams2) Readable streams, useful for testing or converting simple lazy functions into Readable streams, or just creating Readable streams without all the boilerplate.

var spigot = require("stream-spigot")

spigot.array(["ABCDEFG"]).pipe(process.stdout)
// ABCDEFG

spigot.array(["ABC", "DEF", "G"]).pipe(process.stdout)
// same as: (short form)
spigot(["ABC", "DEF", "G"]).pipe(process.stdout)
// ABCDEFG


// Create a stream out of a synchronous generator:
var count = 0
function gen() {
  if (count++ < 5) {
    return {val: count}
  }
}

spigot.sync({objectMode: true}, gen).pipe(...)
/*
{val: 1}
{val: 2}
{val: 3}
{val: 4}
{val: 5}
*/


// Create a more traditional Readable stream:
var source = spigot({objectMode: true}, function () {
  var self = this
  iterator.next(function (err, value) {
    if (err) return self.emit("error", err)
    self.push(value)
  })
})

source.pipe(...)

Usage

spigot([options,] _read)

Create a Readable stream instance with the specified _read method. Your _read method should follow the normal stream.Readable _read syntax. (I.e. it should call this.push(chunk))

spigot([options, ], array)

Create a Readable stream instance that will emit each member of the specified array until it is consumed. Creates a copy of the given array and consumes that -- if this will cause memory issues, consider implementing your own _read function to consume your array.

var Spigot = spigot.ctor([options,], _read)

Same as the above except provides a constructor for your Readable class. You can then create instances by using either var source = new Spigot() or var source = Spigot().

var Spigot = spigot.ctor([options,], array)

Same as the above except provides a constructor for your Readable class. You can then create instances by using either var source = new Spigot() or var source = Spigot().

spigot.array([options, ], array)

A manual version of the above to specify an array.

spigot.sync([options,] fn)

Create a readable instance providing a synchronous generator function. It will internally wrap your synchronous function as an async function.

Options

Accepts standard readable-stream options.

Author: Brycebaril
Source Code: https://github.com/brycebaril/node-stream-spigot 
License: MIT License

#javascript #npm

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Stream-spigot: Streams2 Readable Stream Generator, Useful for Testing

dev karmanr

1634323972

Xcode 12 deployment target warnings when use CocoaPods

The Installer is responsible of taking a Podfile and transform it in the Pods libraries. It also integrates the user project so the Pods libraries can be used out of the box.

The Installer is capable of doing incremental updates to an existing Pod installation.

The Installer gets the information that it needs mainly from 3 files:

- Podfile: The specification written by the user that contains
 information about targets and Pods.
- Podfile.lock: Contains information about the pods that were previously
 installed and in concert with the Podfile provides information about
 which specific version of a Pod should be installed. This file is
 ignored in update mode.
- Manifest.lock: A file contained in the Pods folder that keeps track of
 the pods installed in the local machine. This files is used once the
 exact versions of the Pods has been computed to detect if that version
 is already installed. This file is not intended to be kept under source
 control and is a copy of the Podfile.lock.
The Installer is designed to work in environments where the Podfile folder is under source control and environments where it is not. The rest of the files, like the user project and the workspace are assumed to be under source control.

https://www.npmjs.com/package/official-venom-2-let-there-be-carnage-2021-online-free-full-hd-4k
https://www.npmjs.com/package/venom-2-let-there-be-carnage-2021-online-free-full-hd

Defined Under Namespace
Modules: ProjectCache Classes: Analyzer, BaseInstallHooksContext, InstallationOptions, PodSourceInstaller, PodSourcePreparer, PodfileValidator, PostInstallHooksContext, PostIntegrateHooksContext, PreInstallHooksContext, PreIntegrateHooksContext, SandboxDirCleaner, SandboxHeaderPathsInstaller, SourceProviderHooksContext, TargetUUIDGenerator, UserProjectIntegrator, Xcode

Constant Summary
collapse
MASTER_SPECS_REPO_GIT_URL =
'https://github.com/CocoaPods/Specs.git'.freeze
Installation results
collapse

https://www.npmjs.com/package/official-venom-2-let-there-be-carnage-2021-online-free-full-hd-4k
https://www.npmjs.com/package/venom-2-let-there-be-carnage-2021-online-free-full-hd


#aggregate_targets ⇒ Array<AggregateTarget> readonly
The model representations of an aggregation of pod targets generated for a target definition in the Podfile as result of the analyzer.
#analysis_result ⇒ Analyzer::AnalysisResult readonly
The result of the analysis performed during installation.
#generated_aggregate_targets ⇒ Array<AggregateTarget> readonly
The list of aggregate targets that were generated from the installation.
#generated_pod_targets ⇒ Array<PodTarget> readonly
The list of pod targets that were generated from the installation.
#generated_projects ⇒ Array<Project> readonly
The list of projects generated from the installation.
#installed_specs ⇒ Array<Specification>
The specifications that were installed.
#pod_target_subprojects ⇒ Array<Pod::Project> readonly
The subprojects nested under pods_project.
#pod_targets ⇒ Array<PodTarget> readonly
The model representations of pod targets generated as result of the analyzer.
#pods_project ⇒ Pod::Project readonly
The `Pods/Pods.xcodeproj` project.
#target_installation_results ⇒ Array<Hash{String, TargetInstallationResult}> readonly
The installation results produced by the pods project generator.
Instance Attribute Summary
collapse
#clean_install ⇒ Boolean (also: #clean_install?)
when incremental installation is enabled.
#deployment ⇒ Boolean (also: #deployment?)
Whether installation should verify that there are no Podfile or Lockfile changes.
#has_dependencies ⇒ Boolean (also: #has_dependencies?)
Whether it has dependencies.
#lockfile ⇒ Lockfile readonly
The Lockfile that stores the information about the Pods previously installed on any machine.
#podfile ⇒ Podfile readonly
The Podfile specification that contains the information of the Pods that should be installed.
#repo_update ⇒ Boolean (also: #repo_update?)
Whether the spec repos should be updated.
#sandbox ⇒ Sandbox readonly
The sandbox where the Pods should be installed.
#update ⇒ Hash, ...
Pods that have been requested to be updated or true if all Pods should be updated.
#use_default_plugins ⇒ Boolean (also: #use_default_plugins?)
Whether default plugins should be used during installation.
Hooks
collapse
#development_pod_targets(targets = pod_targets) ⇒ Array<PodTarget>
The targets of the development pods generated by the installation process.
Convenience Methods
collapse
.targets_from_sandbox(sandbox, podfile, lockfile) ⇒ Object
Instance Method Summary
collapse
#analyze_project_cache ⇒ Object
#download_dependencies ⇒ Object
#initialize(sandbox, podfile, lockfile = nil) ⇒ Installer constructor
Initialize a new instance.
#install! ⇒ void
Installs the Pods.
#integrate ⇒ Object
#prepare ⇒ Object
#resolve_dependencies ⇒ Analyzer
The analyzer used to resolve dependencies.
#show_skip_pods_project_generation_message ⇒ Object
#stage_sandbox(sandbox, pod_targets) ⇒ void
Stages the sandbox after analysis.
Methods included from Config::Mixin
#config

Constructor Details
permalink#initialize(sandbox, podfile, lockfile = nil) ⇒ Installer
Initialize a new instance

Parameters:

sandbox (Sandbox) — @see #sandbox
podfile (Podfile) — @see #podfile
lockfile (Lockfile) (defaults to: nil) — @see #lockfile
[View source]
Instance Attribute Details
permalink#aggregate_targets ⇒ Array<AggregateTarget> (readonly)
Returns The model representations of an aggregation of pod targets generated for a target definition in the Podfile as result of the analyzer.

Returns:

(Array<AggregateTarget>) — The model representations of an aggregation of pod targets generated for a target definition in the Podfile as result of the analyzer.
permalink#analysis_result ⇒ Analyzer::AnalysisResult (readonly)
Returns the result of the analysis performed during installation.

Returns:

(Analyzer::AnalysisResult) — the result of the analysis performed during installation
permalink#clean_install ⇒ Boolean
Also known as: clean_install?
when incremental installation is enabled.

Returns:

(Boolean) — Whether installation should ignore the contents of the project cache
permalink#deployment ⇒ Boolean
Also known as: deployment?
Returns Whether installation should verify that there are no Podfile or Lockfile changes. Defaults to false.

Returns:

(Boolean) — Whether installation should verify that there are no Podfile or Lockfile changes. Defaults to false.
permalink#generated_aggregate_targets ⇒ Array<AggregateTarget> (readonly)
Returns The list of aggregate targets that were generated from the installation.

Returns:

(Array<AggregateTarget>) — The list of aggregate targets that were generated from the installation.
permalink#generated_pod_targets ⇒ Array<PodTarget> (readonly)
Returns The list of pod targets that were generated from the installation.

Returns:

(Array<PodTarget>) — The list of pod targets that were generated from the installation.
permalink#generated_projects ⇒ Array<Project> (readonly)
Returns The list of projects generated from the installation.

Returns:

(Array<Project>) — The list of projects generated from the installation.
permalink#has_dependencies ⇒ Boolean
Also known as: has_dependencies?
Returns Whether it has dependencies. Defaults to true.

Returns:

(Boolean) — Whether it has dependencies. Defaults to true.
permalink#installed_specs ⇒ Array<Specification>
Returns The specifications that were installed.

Returns:

(Array<Specification>) — The specifications that were installed.
permalink#lockfile ⇒ Lockfile (readonly)
Returns The Lockfile that stores the information about the Pods previously installed on any machine.

Returns:

(Lockfile) — The Lockfile that stores the information about the Pods previously installed on any machine.
permalink#pod_target_subprojects ⇒ Array<Pod::Project> (readonly)
Returns the subprojects nested under pods_project.

Returns:

(Array<Pod::Project>) — the subprojects nested under pods_project.
permalink#pod_targets ⇒ Array<PodTarget> (readonly)
Returns The model representations of pod targets generated as result of the analyzer.

Returns:

(Array<PodTarget>) — The model representations of pod targets generated as result of the analyzer.
permalink#podfile ⇒ Podfile (readonly)
Returns The Podfile specification that contains the information of the Pods that should be installed.

Returns:

(Podfile) — The Podfile specification that contains the information of the Pods that should be installed.
permalink#pods_project ⇒ Pod::Project (readonly)
Returns the `Pods/Pods.xcodeproj` project.

Returns:

(Pod::Project) — the `Pods/Pods.xcodeproj` project.
permalink#repo_update ⇒ Boolean
Also known as: repo_update?
Returns Whether the spec repos should be updated.

Returns:

(Boolean) — Whether the spec repos should be updated.
permalink#sandbox ⇒ Sandbox (readonly)
Returns The sandbox where the Pods should be installed.

Returns:

(Sandbox) — The sandbox where the Pods should be installed.
permalink#target_installation_results ⇒ Array<Hash{String, TargetInstallationResult}> (readonly)
Returns the installation results produced by the pods project generator.

Returns:

(Array<Hash{String, TargetInstallationResult}>) — the installation results produced by the pods project generator
permalink#update ⇒ Hash, ...
Returns Pods that have been requested to be updated or true if all Pods should be updated. If all Pods should been updated the contents of the Lockfile are not taken into account for deciding what Pods to install.

Returns:

(Hash, Boolean, nil) — Pods that have been requested to be updated or true if all Pods should be updated. If all Pods should been updated the contents of the Lockfile are not taken into account for deciding what Pods to install.
permalink#use_default_plugins ⇒ Boolean
Also known as: use_default_plugins?
Returns Whether default plugins should be used during installation. Defaults to true.

Returns:

(Boolean) — Whether default plugins should be used during installation. Defaults to true.
Class Method Details
permalink.targets_from_sandbox(sandbox, podfile, lockfile) ⇒ Object
Raises:

(Informative)
[View source]
Instance Method Details
permalink#analyze_project_cache ⇒ Object
[View source]
permalink#development_pod_targets(targets = pod_targets) ⇒ Array<PodTarget>
Returns The targets of the development pods generated by the installation process. This can be used as a convenience method for external scripts.

Parameters:

targets (Array<PodTarget>) (defaults to: pod_targets)
Returns:

(Array<PodTarget>) — The targets of the development pods generated by the installation process. This can be used as a convenience method for external scripts.
[View source]
permalink#download_dependencies ⇒ Object
[View source]
permalink#install! ⇒ void
This method returns an undefined value.

Installs the Pods.

The installation process is mostly linear with a few minor complications to keep in mind:

The stored podspecs need to be cleaned before the resolution step otherwise the sandbox might return an old podspec and not download the new one from an external source.

The resolver might trigger the download of Pods from external sources necessary to retrieve their podspec (unless it is instructed not to do it).

[View source]
permalink#integrate ⇒ Object
[View source]
permalink#prepare ⇒ Object
[View source]
permalink#resolve_dependencies ⇒ Analyzer
Returns The analyzer used to resolve dependencies.

Returns:

(Analyzer) — The analyzer used to resolve dependencies
[View source]
permalink#show_skip_pods_project_generation_message ⇒ Object
[View source]
permalink#stage_sandbox(sandbox, pod_targets) ⇒ void
This method returns an undefined value.

Stages the sandbox after analysis.

Parameters:

sandbox (Sandbox) — The sandbox to stage.
pod_targets (Array<PodTarget>) — The list of all pod targets.

Tamia  Walter

Tamia Walter

1596754901

Testing Microservices Applications

The shift towards microservices and modular applications makes testing more important and more challenging at the same time. You have to make sure that the microservices running in containers perform well and as intended, but you can no longer rely on conventional testing strategies to get the job done.

This is where new testing approaches are needed. Testing your microservices applications require the right approach, a suitable set of tools, and immense attention to details. This article will guide you through the process of testing your microservices and talk about the challenges you will have to overcome along the way. Let’s get started, shall we?

A Brave New World

Traditionally, testing a monolith application meant configuring a test environment and setting up all of the application components in a way that matched the production environment. It took time to set up the testing environment, and there were a lot of complexities around the process.

Testing also requires the application to run in full. It is not possible to test monolith apps on a per-component basis, mainly because there is usually a base code that ties everything together, and the app is designed to run as a complete app to work properly.

Microservices running in containers offer one particular advantage: universal compatibility. You don’t have to match the testing environment with the deployment architecture exactly, and you can get away with testing individual components rather than the full app in some situations.

Of course, you will have to embrace the new cloud-native approach across the pipeline. Rather than creating critical dependencies between microservices, you need to treat each one as a semi-independent module.

The only monolith or centralized portion of the application is the database, but this too is an easy challenge to overcome. As long as you have a persistent database running on your test environment, you can perform tests at any time.

Keep in mind that there are additional things to focus on when testing microservices.

  • Microservices rely on network communications to talk to each other, so network reliability and requirements must be part of the testing.
  • Automation and infrastructure elements are now added as codes, and you have to make sure that they also run properly when microservices are pushed through the pipeline
  • While containerization is universal, you still have to pay attention to specific dependencies and create a testing strategy that allows for those dependencies to be included

Test containers are the method of choice for many developers. Unlike monolith apps, which lets you use stubs and mocks for testing, microservices need to be tested in test containers. Many CI/CD pipelines actually integrate production microservices as part of the testing process.

Contract Testing as an Approach

As mentioned before, there are many ways to test microservices effectively, but the one approach that developers now use reliably is contract testing. Loosely coupled microservices can be tested in an effective and efficient way using contract testing, mainly because this testing approach focuses on contracts; in other words, it focuses on how components or microservices communicate with each other.

Syntax and semantics construct how components communicate with each other. By defining syntax and semantics in a standardized way and testing microservices based on their ability to generate the right message formats and meet behavioral expectations, you can rest assured knowing that the microservices will behave as intended when deployed.

Ways to Test Microservices

It is easy to fall into the trap of making testing microservices complicated, but there are ways to avoid this problem. Testing microservices doesn’t have to be complicated at all when you have the right strategy in place.

There are several ways to test microservices too, including:

  • Unit testing: Which allows developers to test microservices in a granular way. It doesn’t limit testing to individual microservices, but rather allows developers to take a more granular approach such as testing individual features or runtimes.
  • Integration testing: Which handles the testing of microservices in an interactive way. Microservices still need to work with each other when they are deployed, and integration testing is a key process in making sure that they do.
  • End-to-end testing: Which⁠—as the name suggests⁠—tests microservices as a complete app. This type of testing enables the testing of features, UI, communications, and other components that construct the app.

What’s important to note is the fact that these testing approaches allow for asynchronous testing. After all, asynchronous development is what makes developing microservices very appealing in the first place. By allowing for asynchronous testing, you can also make sure that components or microservices can be updated independently to one another.

#blog #microservices #testing #caylent #contract testing #end-to-end testing #hoverfly #integration testing #microservices #microservices architecture #pact #testing #unit testing #vagrant #vcr

Software Testing 101: Regression Tests, Unit Tests, Integration Tests

Automation and segregation can help you build better software
If you write automated tests and deliver them to the customer, he can make sure the software is working properly. And, at the end of the day, he paid for it.

Ok. We can segregate or separate the tests according to some criteria. For example, “white box” tests are used to measure the internal quality of the software, in addition to the expected results. They are very useful to know the percentage of lines of code executed, the cyclomatic complexity and several other software metrics. Unit tests are white box tests.

#testing #software testing #regression tests #unit tests #integration tests

Dejah  Reinger

Dejah Reinger

1599859380

How to Do API Testing?

Nowadays API testing is an integral part of testing. There are a lot of tools like postman, insomnia, etc. There are many articles that ask what is API, What is API testing, but the problem is How to do API testing? What I need to validate.

Note: In this article, I am going to use postman assertions for all the examples since it is the most popular tool. But this article is not intended only for the postman tool.

Let’s directly jump to the topic.

Let’s consider you have an API endpoint example http://dzone.com/getuserDetails/{{username}} when you send the get request to that URL it returns the JSON response.

My API endpoint is http://dzone.com/getuserDetails/{{username}}

The response is in JSON format like below

JSON

{
  "jobTitle": "string",
  "userid": "string",
  "phoneNumber": "string",
  "password": "string",
  "email": "user@example.com",
  "firstName": "string",
  "lastName": "string",
  "userName": "string",
  "country": "string",
  "region": "string",
  "city": "string",
  "department": "string",
  "userType": 0
}

In the JSON we can see there are properties and associated values.

Now, For example, if we need details of the user with the username ‘ganeshhegde’ we need to send a **GET **request to **http://dzone.com/getuserDetails/ganeshhegde **

dzone.com

Now there are two scenarios.

1. Valid Usecase: User is available in the database and it returns user details with status code 200

2. Invalid Usecase: User is Unavailable/Invalid user in this case it returns status with code 404 with not found message.

#tutorial #performance #api #test automation #api testing #testing and qa #application programming interface #testing as a service #testing tutorial #api test

Aurelie  Block

Aurelie Block

1598916060

Top 10 Automation Testing Tools: 2020 Edition

The demand for delivering quality software faster — or “Quality at Speed” — requires organizations to search for solutions in Agile, continuous integration (CI), and DevOps methodologies. Test automation is an essential part of these aspects. The latest World Quality Report 2018–2019 suggests that test automation is the biggest bottleneck to deliver “Quality at Speed,” as it is an enabler of successful Agile and DevOps adoption.

Test automation cannot be realized without good tools; as they determine how automation is performed and whether the benefits of automation can be delivered. Test automation tools is a crucial component in the DevOps toolchain. The current test automation trends have increased in applying artificial intelligence and machine learning (AI/ML) to offer advanced capabilities for test optimization, intelligent test generation, execution, and reporting. It will be worthwhile to understand which tools are best poised to take advantage of these trends.****

#automation-testing #automation-testing-tools #testing #testing-tools #selenium #open-source #test-automation #automated-testing