ChatGPT.el: ChatGPT in Emacs

ChatGPT.el

ChatGPT in Emacs.

Installation

Dependency

pip install epc
pip install git+https://github.com/mmabrouk/chatgpt-wrapper
chatgpt install

This will prompt you to log in with your browser.

NOTE: If you encounter any problems, please submit an issue or see chatgpt-wrapper.

Straight

(use-package chatgpt
  :straight (:host github :repo "joshcho/ChatGPT.el" :files ("dist" "*.el"))
  :init
  (require 'python)
  (setq chatgpt-repo-path "~/.emacs.d/straight/repos/ChatGPT.el/")
  :bind ("C-c q" . chatgpt-query))

Quelpa

(require 'quelpa-use-package)
(use-package chatgpt
  :quelpa ((chatgpt :fetcher git :url "https://github.com/joshcho/ChatGPT.el.git") :upgrade t)
  :init
  (require 'python)
  (setq chatgpt-repo-path (expand-file-name "chatgpt/" quelpa-build-dir))
  :bind ("C-c q" . chatgpt-query))

Spacemacs

In dotspacemacs/user-config function,

(require 'python)
(setq chatgpt-repo-path (expand-file-name "chatgpt/" quelpa-build-dir))
(global-set-key (kbd "C-c q") #'chatgpt-query)

In dotspacemacs/layers function for setq-default,

dotspacemacs-additional-packages
'(
  (chatgpt :location (recipe
                      :fetcher github
                      :repo "joshcho/ChatGPT.el"))
  ;; other additional packages...
  )

NOTE: Assumes Quelpa installation.

Doom Emacs

In packages.el ,

(package! chatgpt
  :recipe (:host github :repo "joshcho/ChatGPT.el" :files ("dist" "*.el")))

In config.el ,

(use-package! chatgpt
  :defer t
  :config
  (unless (boundp 'python-interpreter)
    (defvaralias 'python-interpreter 'python-shell-interpreter))
  (setq chatgpt-repo-path (expand-file-name "straight/repos/ChatGPT.el/" doom-local-dir))
  (set-popup-rule! (regexp-quote "*ChatGPT*")
    :side 'bottom :size .5 :ttl nil :quit t :modeline nil)
  :bind ("C-c q" . chatgpt-query))

Usage

  • Press C-c q to query ChatGPT.
  • Select region, then C-c q will prompt you to select a type: doc, bug, understand, or improve. Select a type to query ChatGPT with that prompt.
  • Try making queries in quick succession.
  • If your login is expired, try
pkill ms-playwright/firefox && chatgpt install

in the shell.

  • To reset your conversation, try M-x chatgpt-reset.

Troubleshooting

  • For most scenarios, the reliable method is pkill ms-playwright/firefox && chatgpt install to reauthenticate yourself.
  • Also try M-x chatgpt-reset.
  • If for some reason the ellipses keep blinking, try M-x chatgpt-stop.
  • Make sure you have python installed, and python-interpreter is set (most likely set it to “python” or “python3”).
  • If none of these methods work, please submit an issue.

Customization

Customize chatgpt-query-format-string-map for your own types.

(setq chatgpt-query-format-string-map '(
                                        ;; ChatGPT.el defaults
                                        ("doc" . "Please write the documentation for the following function.\n\n%s")
                                        ("bug" . "There is a bug in the following function, please help me fix it.\n\n%s")
                                        ("understand" . "What does the following function do?\n\n%s")
                                        ("improve" . "Please improve the following code.\n\n%s")
                                        ;; your new prompt
                                        ("my-custom-type" . "My custom prompt.\n\n%s")))

Misc.

  • Don’t use “custom” as a type. It’s reserved for custom prepend string through minibuffer.
  • Check out Pen.el

Download Details:

Author: joshcho
Source Code: https://github.com/joshcho/ChatGPT.el

License: GPL-3.0 license

#chatgpt 

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

ChatGPT.el: ChatGPT in Emacs

ChatGPT.el: ChatGPT in Emacs

ChatGPT.el

ChatGPT in Emacs.

Installation

Dependency

pip install epc
pip install git+https://github.com/mmabrouk/chatgpt-wrapper
chatgpt install

This will prompt you to log in with your browser.

NOTE: If you encounter any problems, please submit an issue or see chatgpt-wrapper.

Straight

(use-package chatgpt
  :straight (:host github :repo "joshcho/ChatGPT.el" :files ("dist" "*.el"))
  :init
  (require 'python)
  (setq chatgpt-repo-path "~/.emacs.d/straight/repos/ChatGPT.el/")
  :bind ("C-c q" . chatgpt-query))

Quelpa

(require 'quelpa-use-package)
(use-package chatgpt
  :quelpa ((chatgpt :fetcher git :url "https://github.com/joshcho/ChatGPT.el.git") :upgrade t)
  :init
  (require 'python)
  (setq chatgpt-repo-path (expand-file-name "chatgpt/" quelpa-build-dir))
  :bind ("C-c q" . chatgpt-query))

Spacemacs

In dotspacemacs/user-config function,

(require 'python)
(setq chatgpt-repo-path (expand-file-name "chatgpt/" quelpa-build-dir))
(global-set-key (kbd "C-c q") #'chatgpt-query)

In dotspacemacs/layers function for setq-default,

dotspacemacs-additional-packages
'(
  (chatgpt :location (recipe
                      :fetcher github
                      :repo "joshcho/ChatGPT.el"))
  ;; other additional packages...
  )

NOTE: Assumes Quelpa installation.

Doom Emacs

In packages.el ,

(package! chatgpt
  :recipe (:host github :repo "joshcho/ChatGPT.el" :files ("dist" "*.el")))

In config.el ,

(use-package! chatgpt
  :defer t
  :config
  (unless (boundp 'python-interpreter)
    (defvaralias 'python-interpreter 'python-shell-interpreter))
  (setq chatgpt-repo-path (expand-file-name "straight/repos/ChatGPT.el/" doom-local-dir))
  (set-popup-rule! (regexp-quote "*ChatGPT*")
    :side 'bottom :size .5 :ttl nil :quit t :modeline nil)
  :bind ("C-c q" . chatgpt-query))

Usage

  • Press C-c q to query ChatGPT.
  • Select region, then C-c q will prompt you to select a type: doc, bug, understand, or improve. Select a type to query ChatGPT with that prompt.
  • Try making queries in quick succession.
  • If your login is expired, try
pkill ms-playwright/firefox && chatgpt install

in the shell.

  • To reset your conversation, try M-x chatgpt-reset.

Troubleshooting

  • For most scenarios, the reliable method is pkill ms-playwright/firefox && chatgpt install to reauthenticate yourself.
  • Also try M-x chatgpt-reset.
  • If for some reason the ellipses keep blinking, try M-x chatgpt-stop.
  • Make sure you have python installed, and python-interpreter is set (most likely set it to “python” or “python3”).
  • If none of these methods work, please submit an issue.

Customization

Customize chatgpt-query-format-string-map for your own types.

(setq chatgpt-query-format-string-map '(
                                        ;; ChatGPT.el defaults
                                        ("doc" . "Please write the documentation for the following function.\n\n%s")
                                        ("bug" . "There is a bug in the following function, please help me fix it.\n\n%s")
                                        ("understand" . "What does the following function do?\n\n%s")
                                        ("improve" . "Please improve the following code.\n\n%s")
                                        ;; your new prompt
                                        ("my-custom-type" . "My custom prompt.\n\n%s")))

Misc.

  • Don’t use “custom” as a type. It’s reserved for custom prepend string through minibuffer.
  • Check out Pen.el

Download Details:

Author: joshcho
Source Code: https://github.com/joshcho/ChatGPT.el

License: GPL-3.0 license

#chatgpt 

Dcode show

Dcode show

1675329550

How To Use ChatGPT For coding | Let ChatGPT Write Your HTML Code | ChatGPT

How To Use ChatGPT For coding | Let ChatGPT Write Your HTML Code | ChatGPT
#chatgpt #chatgptexplained #chatgpttutorial #chatgpt3 #chatgpt 
https://youtu.be/PBPeShtwtP8

Orion  Lehner

Orion Lehner

1672298640

Playwright Chatgpt: A Technical Book Written with OpenAI ChatGPT

playwright-chatgpt

This is an experimental book written on the Playwright testing library with the help of OpenAI ChatGPT.

Note The content of this book is not up to date with the current release of the Playwright library as OpenAI ChatGPT dataset is up to 2021. The code examples offered by ChatGPT are not tested and are limited to its dataset. Grammarly detected about 4.5% plagiarism in the content generated by ChatGPT. Please read Playwright Docs for latest changes and features

What is Playwright?

Playwright is a tool for automating end-to-end tests for web applications. It is a Node.js library that allows developers to write tests using JavaScript or TypeScript, and it supports modern web browsers like Chrome, Firefox, and Microsoft Edge. Playwright can be used to test web applications by simulating user interactions, such as clicking buttons and filling out forms, and it can also be used to take screenshots and generate performance metrics. It is similar to other web automation tools like Selenium and Puppeteer, but it offers additional features and capabilities.

History of Playwright

As far as I know, Playwright is a relatively new tool for automating end-to-end tests for web applications. It was first released in 2020 by the company OpenAI Microsoft, and it has since gained popularity among web developers as a powerful and user-friendly alternative to other web automation tools like Selenium and Puppeteer.

Before Playwright, web developers typically used tools like Selenium and Puppeteer to automate end-to-end tests for web applications. These tools allowed developers to write tests using a variety of programming languages, but they had some limitations, such as difficulty in writing asynchronous tests and the need to use separate tools for taking screenshots and generating performance metrics.

Playwright was created to address these limitations and provide web developers with a more comprehensive and user-friendly tool for automating end-to-end tests. It has a simple, intuitive API and support for modern web browsers, and it also includes features like automated waiting and the ability to take screenshots and generate performance metrics. Since its release, Playwright has been widely adopted by web developers and has become a popular choice for automating end-to-end tests.

What are key features of Playwright?

Here are some of the key features of Playwright:

  • Cross-browser testing: Playwright allows developers to write tests that can run on multiple web browsers, including Chrome, Firefox, and Microsoft Edge.
  • Easy to use: Playwright has a simple, intuitive API that makes it easy for developers to write end-to-end tests for web applications.
  • Automated waiting: Playwright automatically waits for pages to load and for elements to become available before performing actions, which can help make tests more stable and reliable.
  • Screenshot and performance metrics: Playwright can take screenshots and generate performance metrics during tests, which can be useful for debugging and optimization.
  • Headless testing: Playwright can run tests in a headless mode, which means it can run tests without launching a visible web browser window. This can be useful for running tests on a continuous integration server, for example.
  • Support for asynchronous testing: Playwright allows developers to write asynchronous tests, which can be useful for testing complex, real-world scenarios.

These are just some of the key features of Playwright. For more information, you can check out the Playwright documentation or other online resources.

What are the use cases of Playwright?

Playwright is a tool for automating end-to-end tests for web applications. It can be used in a variety of different scenarios and contexts to test the functionality, performance, and behavior of web applications.

Some common use cases for Playwright include:

  • Regression testing: Playwright can be used to write tests that verify the behavior of a web application over time. These tests can be run regularly to ensure that the application continues to work as expected and to detect any regressions or bugs that may have been introduced by new code or changes to the application.
  • Integration testing: Playwright can be used to write tests that verify the integration of different components or features of a web application. These tests can help ensure that the application works as expected when different parts of the system are combined, and they can help detect any issues or inconsistencies that may arise when the application is used in the real world.
  • Performance testing: Playwright can be used to write tests that measure the performance of a web application. These tests can help identify bottlenecks and other performance issues, and they can also be used to compare the performance of different versions of the application or different configurations.
  • User acceptance testing: Playwright can be used to write tests that simulate real-world user interactions with a web application. These tests can be used to verify that the application is user-friendly and easy to use, and they can help identify any usability or accessibility issues that may need to be addressed.
  • These are just some examples of the types of scenarios and contexts in which Playwright can be used. Depending on the specific needs and requirements of your project, you may find other use cases for Playwright, or you may need to use a different tool or approach to automate your tests.

How does Playwright compare with Selenium and Cypress?

Playwright, Selenium, and Cypress are all tools that can be used to automate end-to-end tests for web applications. They all allow developers to write tests using a variety of programming languages, and they can simulate user interactions like clicking buttons and filling out forms.

One key difference between these tools is the level of abstraction they provide. Playwright and Cypress are both high-level tools, which means they have a simple, intuitive API and abstract away many of the complexities of web automation. This makes them easier to use, but it also means that they may not be as flexible as lower-level tools like Selenium. Selenium, on the other hand, is a lower-level tool that provides more fine-grained control over the web automation process. This makes it more flexible, but it also requires more effort and expertise to use effectively.

Another difference between these tools is the range of features they offer. Playwright and Cypress both include additional features beyond basic web automation, such as support for taking screenshots and generating performance metrics. Selenium, on the other hand, is a more basic tool that focuses primarily on web automation, and it requires the use of separate libraries and tools for taking screenshots and generating performance metrics.

Overall, the choice between Playwright, Selenium, and Cypress will depend on the specific needs and requirements of your project. Playwright and Cypress may be better suited for simpler projects that don't require a lot of customization, while Selenium may be a better choice for more complex projects that require more control over the web automation process. It's also worth considering the specific features and capabilities of each tool to see which one is the best fit for your project.

Explain architecture of Playwright

Playwright is a Node.js library that allows developers to write end-to-end tests for web applications using JavaScript or TypeScript. It is built on top of the WebKit and Chromium open-source web browsers, which are the same engines that power the Safari and Chrome web browsers, respectively.

When a Playwright test is run, the Playwright library establishes a connection to a web browser engine (either WebKit or Chromium) and uses it to load the web application being tested. The test code can then simulate user interactions, such as clicking buttons and filling out forms, and it can also access the web page's content and state. Playwright also includes features like automatic waiting and the ability to take screenshots and generate performance metrics, which can be useful for debugging and optimization.

Overall, the architecture of Playwright is designed to provide a simple and user-friendly API for writing end-to-end tests for web applications, while also leveraging the power and capabilities of the WebKit and Chromium web browser engines. This allows developers to write tests that are easy to maintain and understand, while also providing the flexibility and control needed to test complex, real-world scenarios.

What are the limitations of Playwright?

As with any tool or technology, Playwright has some limitations that you should be aware of. These limitations may affect your decision to use Playwright for your project, and they may also impact how you use Playwright in your tests.

Some of the key limitations of Playwright include:

  • Playwright only supports web applications: Playwright is a tool for automating end-to-end tests for web applications. It cannot be used to automate tests for other types of software or applications, such as desktop or mobile applications.
  • Playwright only works with certain web browsers: Playwright currently supports the WebKit and Chromium web browser engines, which are used by the Safari and Chrome web browsers, respectively. It does not currently support other web browsers like Firefox or Internet Explorer.
  • Playwright has limited flexibility: Playwright is a high-level tool that provides a simple, intuitive API for writing end-to-end tests. This makes it easy to use, but it also means that it may not be as flexible as other, lower-level tools like Selenium. If you need more control over the web automation process, you may need to use a different tool.
  • Playwright may not support all web technologies: Playwright is designed to work with modern web applications that use common web technologies like HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. It may not support more specialized or experimental web technologies, and it may not be able to automate tests for applications that use these technologies.

Overall, while Playwright is a powerful and user-friendly tool for automating end-to-end tests, it has some limitations that you should be aware of. Depending on the specific needs and requirements of your project, you may need to use a different tool or approach to automate your tests.

How to setup Playwright development environment?

To set up a Playwright development environment, you will need to install a few things first. Here is a step-by-step guide:

  1. Install Node.js and npm (the Node.js package manager) on your computer. You can download and install them from the official Node.js website (https://nodejs.org/en/).
  2. Create a new directory for your project and navigate to it in the terminal or command prompt.
  3. Install Playwright and its dependencies by running the following command:
npm install playwright

4.    Install a code editor or IDE of your choice. Some popular options include Visual Studio Code, Atom, and Sublime Text.

5.    Create a new file in your project directory and name it index.js. This will be the main script file for your Playwright tests.

6.    Open the file in your code editor and add the following code to it:

const playwright = require('playwright'); (async () => {  // Your Playwright code goes here })();

7.    Save the file and run it using the following command:

node index.js

This should set up a basic Playwright development environment on your computer. You can now start writing your tests using the Playwright API.

How to navigate to Google and search using Playwright?

To navigate to Google and perform a search using Playwright, you will need to use the Playwright API to control a web browser. Here is an example of how you could do this:

const playwright = require('playwright');

(async () => {
  // Start a new browser instance
  const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch();

  // Create a new page
  const page = await browser.newPage();

  // Navigate to Google
  await page.goto('https://www.google.com/');

  // Type a search query into the search box
  await page.fill('input[name="q"]', 'Playwright');

  // Submit the search form
  await page.click('input[type="submit"]');

  // Wait for the search results to load
  await page.waitForSelector('#search');

  // Close the browser
  await browser.close();
})();

This code will start a new browser instance, navigate to Google, enter a search query, submit the search form, and wait for the results to load. It will then close the browser. Note that this is just a simple example to illustrate how to navigate to Google and perform a search using Playwright. You may need to adjust the code to fit your specific needs.

Which testing frameworks are supported by Playwright?

Playwright is a low-level library for automating web browsers, so it does not come with a built-in testing framework. However, it can be used with any testing framework that supports JavaScript, such as Mocha, Jest, or Jasmine.

Here is an example of how you could use Playwright with the Mocha testing framework:

const playwright = require('playwright');
const assert = require('assert');

describe('My Playwright tests', () => {
  it('should do something', async () => {
    // Start a new browser instance
    const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch();

    // Create a new page
    const page = await browser.newPage();

    // Do something with the page

    // Assert something about the page
    assert(true);

    // Close the browser
    await browser.close();
  });
});

In this example, the describe and it functions are provided by Mocha, and the assert function is provided by the assert module. Playwright is used to control the browser and interact with the page. You can use Playwright with any testing framework that supports JavaScript in a similar way. Just be sure to install the testing framework and any necessary dependencies before running your tests.

Playwright and Jest

Here is an example of a Google search test case using Playwright and Jest:

const playwright = require('playwright');

describe('Google search', () => {
  it('should show results for Playwright', async () => {
    // Start a new browser instance
    const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch();

    // Create a new page
    const page = await browser.newPage();

    // Navigate to Google
    await page.goto('https://www.google.com/');

    // Type a search query into the search box
    await page.fill('input[name="q"]', 'Playwright');

    // Submit the search form
    await page.click('input[type="submit"]');

    // Wait for the search results to load
    await page.waitForSelector('#search');

    // Check if the page contains the expected text
    const text = await page.evaluate(() => document.body.textContent);
    expect(text).toContain('Playwright');

    // Close the browser
    await browser.close();
  });
});

 

This test case uses Playwright to control the browser and interact with the page, and Jest to structure the test and make assertions about the page. It navigates to Google, performs a search for "Playwright", and checks if the page contains the expected text. Note that this is just a simple example to illustrate how to use Playwright and Jest together. You may need to adjust the code to fit your specific needs. For example, you may want to add more test cases or make more detailed assertions about the page.

How does Playwright identifies HTML elements?

Playwright uses CSS selectors to identify HTML elements on a web page. CSS selectors are patterns that match specific elements based on their attributes and relationship to other elements in the page.

For example, if you want to click on a button with the text "Submit" on a web page using Playwright, you could use the following CSS selector:

button[type="submit"]

This selector will match any button element on the page with a type attribute set to "submit". Playwright will then use this selector to locate the element on the page and perform the desired action, such as clicking on it.

You can use a wide variety of CSS selectors to identify different types of elements on the page. For example, you can use class and ID selectors to match elements based on their class and ID attributes, respectively. You can also use attribute selectors to match elements based on their attribute values, and combinators to match elements based on their relationship to other elements in the page.

Playwright also provides a number of convenience methods that allow you to easily find elements on the page without needing to know the exact CSS selector for the element. For example, you can use the page.$ method to find an element by its text content, or the page.$$ method to find multiple elements that match a given selector.

  1. page.$(selector): This method finds the first element on the page that matches the given CSS selector. For example, page.$('button[type="submit"]') will find the first button element on the page with a type attribute set to "submit".
  2. page.$$(selector): This method finds all elements on the page that match the given CSS selector. For example, page.$$('a') will find all a (link) elements on the page.
  3. page.$eval(selector, pageFunction): This method evaluates the given page function for the first element on the page that matches the given CSS selector. The page function can be any JavaScript code that you want to run in the context of the page. For example, page.$eval('button[type="submit"]', button => button.click()) will find the first button element on the page with a type attribute set to "submit" and click on it.
  4. page.$$eval(selector, pageFunction): This method evaluates the given page function for all elements on the page that match the given CSS selector. The page function can be any JavaScript code that you want to run in the context of the page. For example,page.$$eval('a', links => links.forEach(link => link.click())) will find all a (link) elements on the page and click on each of them.

Overall, these different locator strategies allow you to easily find and interact with elements on the page using CSS selectors and JavaScript code. They are a powerful and flexible way to automate your tests with Playwright.

Examples of CSS selectors in Playwright

Here are some examples of CSS selectors that you can use to identify elements on a web page with Playwright:

  • button: This selector will match any button element on the page.
  • button[type="submit"]: This selector will match any button element on the page with a type attribute set to "submit".
  • #submit-button: This selector will match any element on the page with an ID attribute set to "submit-button".
  • .submit-button: This selector will match any element on the page with a class attribute set to "submit-button".
  • form input: This selector will match any input element that is a descendant of a form element on the page.
  • form > input: This selector will match any input element that is a direct child of a form element on the page.

These are just a few examples of the many different CSS selectors that you can use with Playwright. You can use a wide variety of CSS selectors to match elements based on their attributes, relationships to other elements, and other criteria. You can also use combinators and pseudo-classes to create more complex and powerful selectors.

Overall, CSS selectors are a powerful and flexible way to identify HTML elements on a web page, and Playwright makes it easy to use them in your tests.

Working with the shadow DOM

The shadow DOM is a web standard that allows developers to create isolated, encapsulated DOM trees within a web page. These shadow trees are hidden from the main document, and can only be accessed through JavaScript code that is executed in the context of the shadow tree.

Shadow DOM is useful for creating reusable web components that are self-contained and do not interfere with the rest of the page. For example, a button component may have its own shadow DOM tree with its own styles and behavior, which can be used in different parts of a web page without affecting the styles or behavior of other elements on the page.

To handle shadow DOM in Playwright, you can use the page.evaluateHandle method to query shadow DOM elements and interact with them using the Playwright API.

Here is an example of how to use Playwright to click on a shadow DOM element:

const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch()
const context = await browser.newContext()
const page = await context.newPage()

await page.goto('https://www.example.com/')

// Query the shadow DOM element using a CSS selector
const shadowElement = await page.evaluateHandle(() => {
  return document.querySelector('#my-shadow-element')
})

// Use the click method provided by Playwright to click on the element
await shadowElement.click()

In this example, we use the page.evaluateHandle method to query the shadow DOM element using a CSS selector, and then use the click method provided by Playwright to click on the element. This allows us to easily interact with shadow DOM elements using Playwright.

Note that some methods, such as click, are not available for all types of elements. In such cases, you can use the page.evaluate method to execute JavaScript code that interacts with the shadow DOM elements directly. For example:

const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch()
const context = await browser.newContext()
const page = await context.newPage()

await page.goto('https://www.example.com/')

// Query the shadow DOM element using a CSS selector
const shadowElement = await page.evaluateHandle(() => {
  return document.querySelector('#my-shadow-element')
})

// Use the page.evaluate method to execute JavaScript code that clicks on the element
await page.evaluate(shadowElement => shadowElement.click(), shadowElement)

In this example, we use the page.evaluate method to execute JavaScript code that clicks on the shadow DOM element. This allows us to interact with the shadow DOM element even if the Playwright API does not provide a method for the desired action.

Storing locators in external file

To store locator data in an external file, you can use the require function to import the file containing the locator data into your tests.

Here is an example of how to store locator data in an external file and use it in Playwright tests:

// Define a file named 'locators.js' that exports the locator data
module.exports = {
  usernameField: '#username',
  passwordField: '#password',
  loginButton: '#login',
}

// Import the locator data from the 'locators.js' file
const locators = require('./locators')

// Define a test that uses the locator data
describe('my tests', () => {
  it('should be able to login', async () => {
    // Launch a browser instance
    const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch()

    // Create a new context (i.e. a new incognito window)
    const context = await browser.newContext()

    // Create a new page
    const page = await context.newPage()

    // Navigate to the login page
    await page.goto('https://www.example.com/login')

    // Use the locator data to interact with the page
    await page.fill(locators.usernameField, 'username')
    await page.fill(locators.passwordField, 'password')
    await page.click(locators.loginButton)

    // Close the browser instance
    await browser.close()
  })
})

In this example, we define a file named locators.js that exports an object containing the locator data for the page. We then import the locator data from the locators.js file using the require function, and use the locator data to interact with the page in the tests. This allows us to easily reuse the locator data in multiple tests, and makes it easier to update the locator data if it changes.

How does Playwright interact with the web application?

Playwright is a low-level library for automating web browsers, so it does not interact directly with your web application. Instead, it uses the web browser's APIs to control the browser and interact with the web page.

For example, if you want to fill out a form on a web page using Playwright, you would use the browser's fill method to enter the form data into the appropriate fields. Playwright would then use the browser's APIs to send the data to the web page and submit the form. The web application would then receive the data and process it as usual.

In this way, Playwright acts as a middleman between your tests and the web application. It allows you to automate the browser and interact with the web page, without needing to worry about the details of how the web application works or how it processes the data. This makes it easier to write reliable and maintainable tests for your web application.

The page object in Playwright

In Playwright, the page object represents a web page in a browser, and provides various methods that you can use to interact with the page and its content. Some examples of page methods in Playwright include:

  • page.click: This method simulates a mouse click on a given element on the page.
  • page.fill: This method fills a form field on the page with a given value.
  • page.focus: This method focuses a given element on the page, so that it can be interacted with.
  • page.goto: This method navigates the page to a given URL.
  • page.hover: This method simulates a mouse hover over a given element on the page.
  • page.screenshot: This method takes a screenshot of the page and saves it to a file.
  • page.type: This method simulates typing into a given element on the page.
  • page.waitForSelector: This method waits for a given element to appear on the page, before continuing with the script.
  • page.$: This method returns the first element on the page that matches a given CSS selector.

These are just a few examples of page methods in Playwright. There are many other methods available, which you can use to perform various actions on the page, such as interacting with elements, extracting information from the page, and more.

Overall, the page object in Playwright provide a powerful set of tools for automating and testing web pages, and are an essential part of the Playwright API.

Performing click action on element

Here is an example of how you could use Playwright to click on a button on a web page:

const playwright = require('playwright');

(async () => {
  // Start a new browser instance
  const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch();

  // Create a new page
  const page = await browser.newPage();

  // Navigate to a web page
  await page.goto('https://example.com');

  // Find the button element on the page
  const button = await page.$('button[type="submit"]');

  // Click on the button
  await button.click();

  // Wait for the page to load
  await page.waitForNavigation();

  // Close the browser
  await browser.close();
})();

In this example, the playwright.chromium.launch method is used to start a new browser instance, and the browser.newPage method is used to create a new page. The page.goto method is then used to navigate to a web page, and the page.$ method is used to find the button element on the page.

Once the button is found, the button.click method is used to click on it. This will simulate a user clicking on the button with their mouse, and will trigger any associated events or actions in the web page.

After clicking on the button, the page.waitForNavigation method is used to wait for the page to finish loading. This is important because clicking on the button may cause the page to navigate to a new URL, and you need to wait for the navigation to complete before continuing.

Finally, the browser.close method is used to close the browser instance and clean up any resources.

Overall, this code shows how you can use Playwright to find and interact with elements on a web page, such as clicking on a button. You can use similar approaches

Working with input textbox element

Typing a value in a input textbox element

Here is an example of how you could use Playwright to type a value into an input textbox on a web page:

const playwright = require('playwright');

(async () => {
  // Start a new browser instance
  const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch();

  // Create a new page
  const page = await browser.newPage();

  // Navigate to a web page
  await page.goto('https://example.com');

  // Find the input textbox on the page
  const input = await page.$('input[type="text"]');

  // Type the desired value into the textbox
  await input.type('Hello, world!');

  // Wait for the page to update
  await page.waitForSelector('#typed-text', { visible: true });

  // Close the browser
  await browser.close();
})();

The input.type method is used to type the desired value into the textbox. This method simulates a user typing on a keyboard, and will trigger any associated events or actions in the web page.

The fill method

The process of filling a textbox in Playwright is similar to typing a value into a textbox, as shown in the previous example. Here is an example of how you could use Playwright to fill a textbox with a specific value:

// Find the input textbox on the page
const input = await page.$('input[type="text"]');

// Fill the textbox with the desired value
await input.fill('Hello, world!');

Getting value from the input textbox

Here is an example of how you could use Playwright to get the value of an input textbox on a web page:

// Find the input textbox on the page
const input = await page.$('input[type="text"]');

// Get the value of the input textbox
const value = await input.getValue();

// Print the value to the console
console.log(value);

The input.getValue method is used to get the current value of the textbox. This method will return the value of the textbox, or an empty string if the textbox is empty.

Get attribute value of an element

To get the value of an attribute for an element in Playwright, you can use the element.getAttribute method, as shown in the following example:

const playwright = require('playwright');

(async () => {
  // Start a new browser instance
  const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch();

  // Create a new page
  const page = await browser.newPage();

  // Navigate to a web page
  await page.goto('https://example.com');

  // Find the element on the page
  const element = await page.$('#some-element');

  // Get the value of the "id" attribute for the element
  const id = await element.getAttribute('id');

  // Print the value of the "id" attribute to the console
  console.log(id);

  // Close the browser
  await browser.close();
})();

The element.getAttribute method is used to get the value of the "id" attribute for the element. This method returns a promise that resolves with the value of the attribute, or null if the attribute is not set for the element.

Get CSS property of an element

To get the value of a CSS property for an element in Playwright, you can use the element.getStyleProperty method, as shown in the following example:

const playwright = require('playwright');

(async () => {
  // Start a new browser instance
  const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch();

  // Create a new page
  const page = await browser.newPage();

  // Navigate to a web page
  await page.goto('https://example.com');

  // Find the element on the page
  const element = await page.$('#some-element');

  // Get the value of the "display" CSS property for the element
  const display = await element.getStyleProperty('display');

  // Print the value of the "display" property to the console
  console.log(display);

  // Close the browser
  await browser.close();
})();

The element.getStyleProperty method is used to get the value of the "display" CSS property for the element. This method returns a promise that resolves with the value of the property, or null if the property is not set for the element.

Working with Select element

Getting options from the Select element

Here is an example of how you could use Playwright to get all the options from a dropdown menu on a web page:

const playwright = require('playwright');

(async () => {
  // Start a new browser instance
  const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch();

  // Create a new page
  const page = await browser.newPage();

  // Navigate to a web page
  await page.goto('https://example.com');

  // Find the dropdown menu on the page
  const dropdown = await page.$('select');

  // Get the options from the dropdown
  const options = await dropdown.$$eval('option', (options) => options.map((option) => option.value));

  // Print the options to the console
  console.log(options);

  // Close the browser
  await browser.close();
})();

The dropdown.$$eval method is used to evaluate a JavaScript function that finds all the option elements inside the dropdown menu. The function then returns an array of the values of the option elements, which is stored in the options variable.

The options are then printed to the console using the console.log method. You can use this array in any way you want, such as verifying that it contains the expected options, or using it to perform further actions on the page.

Selecting an option from the Select element

Here is an example of how you could use Playwright to select an item from a dropdown menu on a web page:

const playwright = require('playwright');

(async () => {
  // Start a new browser instance
  const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch();

  // Create a new page
  const page = await browser.newPage();

  // Navigate to a web page
  await page.goto('https://example.com');

  // Find the dropdown menu on the page
  const dropdown = await page.$('select');

  // Select the desired item from the dropdown
  await dropdown.selectOption('Option 2');

  // Wait for the page to update
  await page.waitForSelector('#selected-item', { visible: true });

  // Close the browser
  await browser.close();
})();

The dropdown.selectOption method is used to select the desired option from the menu. This will simulate a user clicking on the option with their mouse, and will trigger any associated events or actions in the web page.

Selecting multiple options in a multi-select Dropdown element

Here is an example of how you could use Playwright to select multiple items from a dropdown menu on a web page:

// Find the dropdown menu on the page
const dropdown = await page.$('select[multiple]');

// Select the desired items from the dropdown
await dropdown.selectOption('Option 2');
await dropdown.selectOption('Option 4');

The dropdown.selectOption method is used to select the desired options from the menu. This method can be called multiple times to select multiple options.

Getting selected item from the Select element

Here is an example of how you could use Playwright to get the selected item from a dropdown menu on a web page:

const playwright = require('playwright');

(async () => {
  // Start a new browser instance
  const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch();

  // Create a new page
  const page = await browser.newPage();

  // Navigate to a web page
  await page.goto('https://example.com');

  // Find the dropdown menu on the page
  const dropdown = await page.$('select');

  // Get the selected option from the dropdown
  const selectedOption = await dropdown.getValue();

  // Print the selected option to the console
  console.log(selectedOption);

  // Close the browser
  await browser.close();
})();

The dropdown.getValue method is used to get the currently selected option from the menu. This method will return the value of the selected option, or an empty string if no option is selected.

Working with Checkbox input element

Here is an example of how you could use Playwright to select and unselect a checkbox on a web page:

const playwright = require('playwright');

(async () => {
  // Start a new browser instance
  const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch();

  // Create a new page
  const page = await browser.newPage();

  // Navigate to a web page
  await page.goto('https://example.com');

  // Find the checkbox on the page
  const checkbox = await page.$('input[type="checkbox"]');

  // Check if the checkbox is currently selected
  const isChecked = await checkbox.getAttribute('checked');

  // Select or unselect the checkbox, depending on its current state
  if (isChecked) {
    await checkbox.uncheck();
  } else {
    await checkbox.check();
  }

  // Wait for the page to update
  await page.waitForSelector('#selected-items', { visible: true });

  // Close the browser
  await browser.close();
})();

In this example, the playwright.chromium.launch method is used to start a new browser instance, and the browser.newPage method is used to create a new page. The page.goto method is then used to navigate to a web page, and the page.$ method is used to find the input element on the page (i.e. the checkbox).

Note that the input element in this example has a type attribute set to "checkbox", which indicates that it is a checkbox. This is necessary because the check and uncheck methods can only be used with checkbox elements.

Once the checkbox is found, the checkbox.getAttribute method is used to get the current value of the "checked" attribute. This attribute is set to "true" if the checkbox is selected, or "false" if it is unselected.

The if statement then checks the value of the "checked" attribute, and either selects or unselects

Working with Radio button input element

Here is an example of how you could use Playwright to select a radio button on a web page:

const playwright = require('playwright');

(async () => {
  // Start a new browser instance
  const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch();

  // Create a new page
  const page = await browser.newPage();

  // Navigate to a web page
  await page.goto('https://example.com');

  // Find the radio button on the page
  const radioButton = await page.$('input[type="radio"][value="option1"]');

  // Check if the radio button is currently selected
  const isChecked = await radioButton.getAttribute('checked');

  // Select the radio button, if it is not already selected
  if (!isChecked) {
    await radioButton.click();
  }

  // Wait for the page to update
  await page.waitForSelector('#selected-option', { visible: true });

  // Close the browser
  await browser.close();
})();

The input element in this example has a type attribute set to "radio" and a value attribute set to "option1". This is necessary because the click method can only be used with radio buttons that have a specific value.

Once the radio button is found, the radioButton.getAttribute method is used to get the current value of the "checked" attribute. This attribute is set to "true" if the radio button is selected, or "false" if it is unselected.

The if statement then checks the value of the "checked" attribute, and only selects the radio button if

Inspecting element state

Element is visible

Here is an example of how you could use Playwright to check if an element is visible on a web page:

const playwright = require('playwright');

(async () => {
  // Start a new browser instance
  const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch();

  // Create a new page
  const page = await browser.newPage();

  // Navigate to a web page
  await page.goto('https://example.com');

  // Find the element on the page
  const element = await page.$('#some-element');

  // Check if the element is visible
  const isVisible = await element.isIntersectingViewport();

  // Print the result to the console
  console.log(isVisible);

  // Close the browser
  await browser.close();
})();

The element.isIntersectingViewport method is used to check if the element is visible. This method returns true if the element is visible, or false if it is not visible (e.g. because it is hidden, or because it is outside the viewport).

The result of the isIntersectingViewport method is then printed to the console using the console.log method, so that you can see if the element is visible or not.

There is another method using the "display" CSS property for the element.

// Find the element on the page
const element = await page.$('#some-element');

// Check if the element is displayed
const isDisplayed = await element.getStyleProperty('display') !== 'none';

// Print the result to the console
console.log(isDisplayed);

The element.getStyleProperty method is used to get the value of the "display" CSS property for the element. This property determines whether or not the element is displayed on the page.

If the "display" property is set to "none", it means that the element is not displayed on the page, and the isDisplayed variable is set to false. Otherwise, the isDisplayed variable is set to true, indicating that the element is displayed on the page.

Element is enabled

Here is an example of how you could use Playwright to check if an element is enabled on a web page:

const playwright = require('playwright');

(async () => {
  // Start a new browser instance
  const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch();

  // Create a new page
  const page = await browser.newPage();

  // Navigate to a web page
  await page.goto('https://example.com');

  // Find the element on the page
  const element = await page.$('#some-element');

  // Check if the element is enabled
  const isEnabled = await element.getAttribute('disabled') !== 'true';

  // Print the result to the console
  console.log(isEnabled);

  // Close the browser
  await browser.close();
})();

The element.getAttribute method is used to get the value of the "disabled" attribute for the element. This attribute determines whether or not the element is enabled on the page.

If the "disabled" attribute is set to "true", it means that the element is not enabled on the page, and the isEnabled variable is set to false. Otherwise, the isEnabled variable is set to true, indicating that the element is enabled on the page.

Taking Screenshot of an element

To take a screenshot of a specific element on a web page using Playwright, you can use the element.screenshot method, as shown in the following example:

const playwright = require('playwright');

(async () => {
  // Start a new browser instance
  const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch();

  // Create a new page
  const page = await browser.newPage();

  // Navigate to a web page
  await page.goto('https://example.com');

  // Find the element on the page
  const element = await page.$('#some-element');

  // Take a screenshot of the element and save it to a file
  await element.screenshot({ path: 'element-screenshot.png' });

  // Close the browser
  await browser.close();
})();

Once the element is found, the element.screenshot method is used to take a screenshot of the element and save it to a file. This method takes an options object as an argument, which can be used to specify the path where the screenshot should be saved. The screenshot is then saved to the specified file using the path option,

Getting Size and Location of an element

To get the size and location of an element on a web page using Playwright, you can use the element.boundingBox method, as shown in the following example:

const playwright = require('playwright');

(async () => {
  // Start a new browser instance
  const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch();

  // Create a new page
  const page = await browser.newPage();

  // Navigate to a web page
  await page.goto('https://example.com');

  // Find the element on the page
  const element = await page.$('#some-element');

  // Get the size and location of the element
  const { x, y, width, height } = await element.boundingBox();

  // Print the size and location of the element to the console
  console.log(`Element is located at x=${x}, y=${y}, and has a width of ${width} and a height of ${height}.`);

  // Close the browser
  await browser.close();
})();

The element.boundingBox method is used to get the size and location of the element. This method returns an object with the properties x, y, width, and height, which represent the coordinates of the top-left corner of the element, as well as the element's width and height, respectively.

Working with the Canvas element

To interact with a canvas element on a web page using Playwright, you can use the page.$eval method, which allows you to evaluate JavaScript code in the context of the page and interact with the canvas element.

Here is an example that shows how to use the page.$eval method to interact with a canvas element on a web page:

const playwright = require('playwright');

(async () => {
  // Start a new browser instance
  const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch();

  // Create a new page
  const page = await browser.newPage();

  // Navigate to a web page with a canvas element
  await page.goto('https://example.com/canvas');

  // Find the canvas element on the page
  const canvas = await page.$('#my-canvas');

  // Use the $eval method to interact with the canvas element
  await canvas.$eval('#my-canvas', (canvas) => {
    // Get the canvas context
    const ctx = canvas.getContext('2d');

    // Draw a circle on the canvas
    ctx.beginPath();
    ctx.arc(100, 100, 50, 0, 2 * Math.PI);
    ctx.fill();
  });

  // Close the browser
  await browser.close();
})();

In this example, the playwright.chromium.launch method is used to start a new browser instance, and the browser.newPage method is used to create a new page. The page.goto method is then used to navigate to a web page with a canvas element, and the page.$ method is used to find the canvas element on the page.

Once the canvas element is found, the canvas.$eval method is used to evaluate JavaScript code in the context of the page and interact with the canvas element. In this case, the code uses the canvas.getContext method to get the canvas context, and then uses the context to draw a circle on the canvas.

Overall, this code shows how you can use Playwright to interact with a canvas element on a web page and perform actions such as drawing or animating on the canvas. You can use similar approaches to interact with other elements or components on the page, such as images, videos, or interactive forms.

Working with the SVG element

To work with SVG elements in Playwright, you can use the page.$eval or page.evaluate method to query the SVG elements using CSS selectors, and then use the methods provided by Playwright to interact with the elements.

Here is an example of how to use Playwright to click on an SVG element:

const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch()
const context = await browser.newContext()
const page = await context.newPage()

await page.goto('https://www.example.com/')

// Query the SVG element using a CSS selector
const svgElement = await page.$eval('#my-svg-element', el => el)

// Use the click method provided by Playwright to click on the element
await svgElement.click()

In this example, we use the page.$eval method to query the SVG element using a CSS selector, and then use the click method provided by Playwright to click on the element. This allows us to easily interact with SVG elements using Playwright.

Note that some methods, such as click, are not available for all types of elements. In such cases, you can use the page.evaluate method to execute JavaScript code that interacts with the SVG elements directly. For example:

const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch()
const context = await browser.newContext()
const page = await context.newPage()

await page.goto('https://www.example.com/')

// Query the SVG element using a CSS selector
const svgElement = await page.$eval('#my-svg-element', el => el)

// Use the page.evaluate method to execute JavaScript code that clicks on the element
await page.evaluate(svgElement => svgElement.click(), svgElement)

In this example, we use the page.evaluate method to execute JavaScript code that clicks on the SVG element. This allows us to interact with the SVG element even if the Playwright API does not provide a method for the desired action.

Performing keyboard events

The page.keyboard object in Playwright is used to simulate keyboard events on a web page, such as typing text or pressing keys. It provides a number of methods and properties that you can use to interact with the keyboard in your tests or other code.

For example, the page.keyboard.press method can be used to press a specific key on the keyboard, such as the Enter or Tab key. The page.keyboard.type method can be used to simulate typing text, including special characters and modifier keys like Ctrl or Alt. The page.keyboard.down and page.keyboard.up methods can be used to simulate pressing and releasing a specific key.

In addition, the page.keyboard object provides properties that you can use to configure the behavior of keyboard events, such as the page.keyboard.delay property, which specifies the delay between key presses when typing text, or the page.keyboard.autoRepeatDelay property, which specifies the delay before auto-repeating a held key.

Overall, the page.keyboard object in Playwright provides a powerful set of tools for simulating keyboard events on a web page, and can be used to automate a wide range of interactions and tests.

To press keys, such as the Enter or Tab key, on a web page using Playwright, you can use the page.keyboard.press method, as shown in the following example:

const playwright = require('playwright');

(async () => {
  // Start a new browser instance
  const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch();

  // Create a new page
  const page = await browser.newPage();

  // Navigate to a web page
  await page.goto('https://example.com');

  // Find the input field on the page
  const input = await page.$('#some-input');

  // Type "Hello, world!" into the input field
  await input.type('Hello, world!');

  // Press the Tab key to move focus to the next element
  await page.keyboard.press('Tab');

  // Press the Enter key to submit the form
  await page.keyboard.press('Enter');

  // Close the browser
  await browser.close();
})();

In this example, the playwright.chromium.launch method is used to start a new browser instance, and the browser.newPage method is used to create a new page. The page.goto method is then used to navigate to a web page, and the page.$ method is used to find the input field on the page.

Once the input field is found, the input.type method is used to type "Hello, world!" into the field. Then, the page.keyboard.press method is used to press the Tab key to move focus to the next element on the page. Finally, the page.keyboard.press method is used again, this time to press the Enter key to submit the form.

Finally, the browser.close method is used to close the browser instance and clean up any resources.

To simulate copy and paste keyboard events, such as Ctrl + C and Ctrl + V, on a web page using Playwright, you can use the page.keyboard.type method, as shown in the following example:

const playwright = require('playwright');

(async () => {
  // Start a new browser instance
  const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch();

  // Create a new page
  const page = await browser.newPage();

  // Navigate to a web page
  await page.goto('https://example.com');

  // Find the input field on the page
  const input = await page.$('#some-input');

  // Type "Hello, world!" into the input field
  await input.type('Hello, world!');

  // Select the text in the input field
  await input.selectText();

  // Simulate pressing Ctrl + C to copy the text
  await page.keyboard.type('^C');

  // Find the textarea on the page
  const textarea = await page.$('#some-textarea');

  // Focus the textarea
  await textarea.focus();

  // Simulate pressing Ctrl + V to paste the copied text
  await page.keyboard.type('^V');

  // Close the browser
  await browser.close();
})();

In this example, the playwright.chromium.launch method is used to start a new browser instance, and the browser.newPage method is used to create a new page. The page.goto method is then used to navigate to a web page, and the page.$ method is used to find the input field and textarea on the page.

Once the input field and textarea are found, the input.type method is used to type "Hello, world!" into the input field. Then, the input.selectText method is used to select the text in the input field, and the page.keyboard.type method is used to simulate pressing Ctrl + C to copy the text.

Next, the textarea.focus method is used to focus the textarea, and the page.keyboard.type method is used again, this time to simulate pressing Ctrl + V to paste the copied

Performing Mouse Events

In Playwright, you can use the page.mouse object to simulate mouse events, such as clicking, double-clicking, or hovering over an element on a web page. This can be useful if you want to test the behavior of a web application in response to these events.

Here is a simple example of how you might use the page.mouse object in Playwright to perform mouse events:

const { playwright } = require('playwright');

(async () => {
  const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch();
  const context = await browser.newContext();
  const page = await context.newPage();
  await page.goto('http://localhost:3000');

  // Click an element on the page
  await page.mouse.click(100, 100);

  // Double-click an element on the page
  await page.mouse.doubleClick(200, 200);

  // Hover over an element on the page
  await page.mouse.move(300, 300);

  await browser.close();
})();

In this example, the page.mouse object is used to simulate a click, double-click, and hover over an element on the page. The click and doubleClick methods take the x and y coordinates of the element as arguments, and the move method takes the coordinates of the element to hover over.

The page.mouse object in Playwright provides several methods for simulating mouse events on a web page. These methods include:

  • page.mouse.click(x, y, options): This method simulates a click at the specified coordinates on the page. The options argument can be used to specify modifier keys like Shift or Alt.
  • page.mouse.doubleClick(x, y, options): This method simulates a double-click at the specified coordinates on the page. The options argument can be used to specify modifier keys like Shift or Alt.
  • page.mouse.down(x, y, options): This method simulates pressing the left mouse button at the specified coordinates on the page. The options argument can be used to specify modifier keys like Shift or Alt.
  • page.mouse.move(x, y, options): This method simulates moving the mouse cursor to the specified coordinates on the page. The options argument can be used to specify modifier keys like Shift or Alt.
  • page.mouse.up(x, y, options): This method simulates releasing the left mouse button at the specified coordinates on the page. The options argument can be used to specify modifier keys like Shift or Alt.

These are just a few examples of the methods that the page.mouse object provides in Playwright.

Performing Drag and Drop

In Playwright, you can use the page.drag and page.drop methods to simulate a drag and drop operation on a web page. This can be useful if you want to test the behavior of a web application when an element is dragged and dropped onto another element.

Here is a simple example of how you might use the page.drag and page.drop methods in Playwright to perform a drag and drop operation:

const { playwright } = require('playwright');

(async () => {
  const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch();
  const context = await browser.newContext();
  const page = await context.newPage();
  await page.goto('http://localhost:3000');

  // Get the coordinates of the source element
  const source = await page.$('#source');
  const { x: sourceX, y: sourceY } = await source.boundingBox();

  // Get the coordinates of the target element
  const target = await page.$('#target');
  const { x: targetX, y: targetY } = await target.boundingBox();

  // Drag the source element to the target element
  await page.drag(sourceX, sourceY, targetX, targetY);
  await page.drop();

  await browser.close();
})();

In this example, the page.drag method is used to simulate dragging the source element to the target element on the page. The page.drag method takes the x and y coordinates of the source element and the target element as arguments, and simulates moving the mouse cursor from the source coordinates to the target coordinates.

Once the drag operation has been simulated, the page.drop method is called to simulate releasing the mouse button, completing the drag and drop operation.

Performing chain of Keyboard and Mouse events

In Playwright, you can use the page.keyboard and page.mouse objects to simulate complex mouse and keyboard events on a web page. This can be useful if you want to test the behavior of a web application in response to these events, such as dragging and dropping an element while holding down a modifier key like Shift or Alt.

Here is a simple example of how you might use the page.keyboard and page.mouse objects in Playwright to perform complex mouse and keyboard events:

const { playwright } = require('playwright');

(async () => {
  const browser = await playwright.chromium.launch();
  const context = await browser.newContext();
  const page = await context.newPage();
  await page.goto('http://localhost:3000');

  // Press the Shift key
  await page.keyboard.down('Shift');

  // Get the coordinates of the source element
  const source = await page.$('#source');
  const { x: sourceX, y: sourceY } = await source.boundingBox();

  // Get the coordinates of the target element
  const target = await page.$('#target');
  const { x: targetX, y: targetY } = await target.boundingBox();

  // Drag the source element to the target element
  await page.mouse.move(sourceX, sourceY);
  await page.mouse.down();
  await page.mouse.move(targetX, targetY);
  await page.mouse.up();

  // Release the Shift key
  await page.keyboard.up('Shift');

  await browser.close();
})();

In this example, the page.keyboard.down and page.keyboard.up methods are used to press and release the Shift key, respectively. This simulates holding down the Shift key while performing a drag and drop operation using the page.mouse object.

The page.mouse object is used to simulate moving the mouse cursor to the source element, pressing the left mouse button, moving the mouse cursor to the target element, and releasing the mouse button. This simulates dragging the source element to the target element on the page.

Index

Credits

The information provided here is as is generated by OpenAI ChatGPT. There are minor edits done to add more context. The cover image is generated by OpenAI DALL·E 2


Download details:

Author: upgundecha
Source code: https://github.com/upgundecha/playwright-chatgpt

License: CC0-1.0 license

#chatgpt #chatgpt 

Elpy: Emacs Python Development Environment

Elpy, the Emacs Python IDE

Elpy is an Emacs package to bring powerful Python editing to Emacs. It combines and configures a number of other packages, both written in Emacs Lisp as well as Python. Elpy is fully documented at Readthedocs.

IMPORTANT NOTE: Looking for a maintainer

I find myself (@galaunay, current maintainer), unable to maintain Elpy at the moment, and probably for a while. If you are interested in getting involved in Elpy, please contact me by mail, the project definitely needs you !

In the meantime, I will keep an eye on the PRs to integrate any fix and/or new features proposed, but I will definitely not be able to treat the issues in a satisfying manner. If you are stuck with an issue, please have a look at the documentation, there is a lot of answers there. @gfederix also made some bug fixing in his fork, so you can try using this version of Elpy.

Features

Installation

Elpy is available on Melpa, the most straightforward way to install it is to use use-package:

(use-package elpy
  :ensure t
  :init
  (elpy-enable))

For other installation alternatives, see the documentation section Installation.

Quickstart

Once installed, Elpy will automatically provide code completion, syntax error highlighting and code hinting (in the modeline) for python files. Elpy offers a lot of features, but the following keybindings should be enough to get started:

  • C-c C-c evaluates the current python script (or region if something is selected) in an interactive python shell. The python shell is automatically displayed aside of your script.
  • C-RET evaluates the current statement (current line plus the following nested lines).
  • C-c C-z switches between your script and the interactive shell.
  • C-c C-d displays documentation for the thing under cursor. The documentation will pop in a different buffer, that can be closed with q.

Please have a look at the documentation at Readthedocs if you want to know more about what Elpy can do.

External resources

Contact

For questions regarding Elpy, do not hesitate to open an issue on github or visit us on IRC, channel #emacs-elpy on irc.freenode.net.

Author: jorgenschaefer
Source Code: https://github.com/jorgenschaefer/elpy
License: GPL-3.0 License

#python #emacs 

Micheal  Block

Micheal Block

1603080000

Top 50 Emacs Commands and Emacs Shortcuts

This article will be solely about serving you with the best Emacs commands and Emacs shortcuts.

Certainly, Emacs is one of the most common text editors we have around these days. Its amazing features, for example, extensibility, customizability, plugins, and self-documentation make it an excellent tool among developers. In addition, Emacs is also called a real-time display text editor.

Moreover, it is a free/libre editor that is compatible with more than one platform. In other words, Emacs supports the Windows, macOS, BSDs, and GNU/Linux operating systems.

It’s interesting to know that almost all keystrokes in emacs yield out into a command. That is to say; a command is always called upon any time users press a key or more keys together.

So, therefore, there are about 3000 emacs commands and the most popularly used commands got a key shortcut. For example, searching the text, opening and closing a file, moving the cursor, etc.

1. Kill-line

This is used for getting rid of every character from the cursor to the end of the line.

Ctrl + k

BashCopy

Features:

  • In addition, all you need do is to press “Ctrl+k.”

2. Backward-kill-word

Its duty is to delete the previous word.

Alt + backspace

BashCopy

Features:

Most importantly, users only need to enter “Alt+backspace“.

3. Kill-word

This does the deleting of words to the right.

Alt + d

BashCopy

Features:

Furthermore, press “Alt+d” to activate this.

4. Scroll-down-command

To sum up, press “Alt+v” to page up.

Alt + v

#dev tips #emacs commands #emacs shortcuts