iOS App Dev

iOS App Dev

1622516462

What is Big Data in Healthcare and How is it Used?

The pandemic is having an enormous impact on the healthcare sector. Between overwhelming hospitalization rates, intensifying cybersecurity threats, and an aggravating number of mental illnesses due to strict lockdown measures, hospitals are desperately searching for help. Big data in healthcare seems like a viable solution. It can proactively provide meaningful, up-to-date information enabling clinics to address pressing issues and prepare for what’s coming.

Hospitals are increasingly turning to big data development service providers to make sense of their operational data. According to Healthcare Weekly, the global big data market in the healthcare industry is expected to reach $34.3 billion by 2022, growing at a CAGR of 22.1%.

So, what is the role of big data analytics in healthcare? Which challenges to expect? And how to set yourself up for success?

How Big Data Can Help Solve Healthcare Problems

Big data has several accepted definitions. Here are two popular ones:

Douglas Laney’s definition. Laney is a former Chief Data Officer at Gartner. He states that big data is characterized by 3 Vs: volume, velocity, and variety. The volume stands for large amounts of data. Velocity refers to the speed of collecting data and making it accessible, while variety indicates the different types of data, such as text, video, logs, audio, etc.McKinsey’s definition. The renowned consulting firm defines big data as datasets whose size is beyond the ability of typical database software tools to capture, store, manage, and analyze.

According to an IDC report, the volume of big data is expected to reach 175 Zettabytes by 2025. To put it in perspective, it will take 1.8 billion years to download this amount of data with the average internet speed available nowadays.

#big-data #big-data-analytics #healthcare-and-big-data #healthcare-tech #medical-software-development #healthcare-software #big-data-processing #healthcare-software-solution

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What is Big Data in Healthcare and How is it Used?
 iOS App Dev

iOS App Dev

1622516462

What is Big Data in Healthcare and How is it Used?

The pandemic is having an enormous impact on the healthcare sector. Between overwhelming hospitalization rates, intensifying cybersecurity threats, and an aggravating number of mental illnesses due to strict lockdown measures, hospitals are desperately searching for help. Big data in healthcare seems like a viable solution. It can proactively provide meaningful, up-to-date information enabling clinics to address pressing issues and prepare for what’s coming.

Hospitals are increasingly turning to big data development service providers to make sense of their operational data. According to Healthcare Weekly, the global big data market in the healthcare industry is expected to reach $34.3 billion by 2022, growing at a CAGR of 22.1%.

So, what is the role of big data analytics in healthcare? Which challenges to expect? And how to set yourself up for success?

How Big Data Can Help Solve Healthcare Problems

Big data has several accepted definitions. Here are two popular ones:

Douglas Laney’s definition. Laney is a former Chief Data Officer at Gartner. He states that big data is characterized by 3 Vs: volume, velocity, and variety. The volume stands for large amounts of data. Velocity refers to the speed of collecting data and making it accessible, while variety indicates the different types of data, such as text, video, logs, audio, etc.McKinsey’s definition. The renowned consulting firm defines big data as datasets whose size is beyond the ability of typical database software tools to capture, store, manage, and analyze.

According to an IDC report, the volume of big data is expected to reach 175 Zettabytes by 2025. To put it in perspective, it will take 1.8 billion years to download this amount of data with the average internet speed available nowadays.

#big-data #big-data-analytics #healthcare-and-big-data #healthcare-tech #medical-software-development #healthcare-software #big-data-processing #healthcare-software-solution

 iOS App Dev

iOS App Dev

1620466520

Your Data Architecture: Simple Best Practices for Your Data Strategy

If you accumulate data on which you base your decision-making as an organization, you should probably think about your data architecture and possible best practices.

If you accumulate data on which you base your decision-making as an organization, you most probably need to think about your data architecture and consider possible best practices. Gaining a competitive edge, remaining customer-centric to the greatest extent possible, and streamlining processes to get on-the-button outcomes can all be traced back to an organization’s capacity to build a future-ready data architecture.

In what follows, we offer a short overview of the overarching capabilities of data architecture. These include user-centricity, elasticity, robustness, and the capacity to ensure the seamless flow of data at all times. Added to these are automation enablement, plus security and data governance considerations. These points from our checklist for what we perceive to be an anticipatory analytics ecosystem.

#big data #data science #big data analytics #data analysis #data architecture #data transformation #data platform #data strategy #cloud data platform #data acquisition

Chloe  Butler

Chloe Butler

1667425440

Pdf2gerb: Perl Script Converts PDF Files to Gerber format

pdf2gerb

Perl script converts PDF files to Gerber format

Pdf2Gerb generates Gerber 274X photoplotting and Excellon drill files from PDFs of a PCB. Up to three PDFs are used: the top copper layer, the bottom copper layer (for 2-sided PCBs), and an optional silk screen layer. The PDFs can be created directly from any PDF drawing software, or a PDF print driver can be used to capture the Print output if the drawing software does not directly support output to PDF.

The general workflow is as follows:

  1. Design the PCB using your favorite CAD or drawing software.
  2. Print the top and bottom copper and top silk screen layers to a PDF file.
  3. Run Pdf2Gerb on the PDFs to create Gerber and Excellon files.
  4. Use a Gerber viewer to double-check the output against the original PCB design.
  5. Make adjustments as needed.
  6. Submit the files to a PCB manufacturer.

Please note that Pdf2Gerb does NOT perform DRC (Design Rule Checks), as these will vary according to individual PCB manufacturer conventions and capabilities. Also note that Pdf2Gerb is not perfect, so the output files must always be checked before submitting them. As of version 1.6, Pdf2Gerb supports most PCB elements, such as round and square pads, round holes, traces, SMD pads, ground planes, no-fill areas, and panelization. However, because it interprets the graphical output of a Print function, there are limitations in what it can recognize (or there may be bugs).

See docs/Pdf2Gerb.pdf for install/setup, config, usage, and other info.


pdf2gerb_cfg.pm

#Pdf2Gerb config settings:
#Put this file in same folder/directory as pdf2gerb.pl itself (global settings),
#or copy to another folder/directory with PDFs if you want PCB-specific settings.
#There is only one user of this file, so we don't need a custom package or namespace.
#NOTE: all constants defined in here will be added to main namespace.
#package pdf2gerb_cfg;

use strict; #trap undef vars (easier debug)
use warnings; #other useful info (easier debug)


##############################################################################################
#configurable settings:
#change values here instead of in main pfg2gerb.pl file

use constant WANT_COLORS => ($^O !~ m/Win/); #ANSI colors no worky on Windows? this must be set < first DebugPrint() call

#just a little warning; set realistic expectations:
#DebugPrint("${\(CYAN)}Pdf2Gerb.pl ${\(VERSION)}, $^O O/S\n${\(YELLOW)}${\(BOLD)}${\(ITALIC)}This is EXPERIMENTAL software.  \nGerber files MAY CONTAIN ERRORS.  Please CHECK them before fabrication!${\(RESET)}", 0); #if WANT_DEBUG

use constant METRIC => FALSE; #set to TRUE for metric units (only affect final numbers in output files, not internal arithmetic)
use constant APERTURE_LIMIT => 0; #34; #max #apertures to use; generate warnings if too many apertures are used (0 to not check)
use constant DRILL_FMT => '2.4'; #'2.3'; #'2.4' is the default for PCB fab; change to '2.3' for CNC

use constant WANT_DEBUG => 0; #10; #level of debug wanted; higher == more, lower == less, 0 == none
use constant GERBER_DEBUG => 0; #level of debug to include in Gerber file; DON'T USE FOR FABRICATION
use constant WANT_STREAMS => FALSE; #TRUE; #save decompressed streams to files (for debug)
use constant WANT_ALLINPUT => FALSE; #TRUE; #save entire input stream (for debug ONLY)

#DebugPrint(sprintf("${\(CYAN)}DEBUG: stdout %d, gerber %d, want streams? %d, all input? %d, O/S: $^O, Perl: $]${\(RESET)}\n", WANT_DEBUG, GERBER_DEBUG, WANT_STREAMS, WANT_ALLINPUT), 1);
#DebugPrint(sprintf("max int = %d, min int = %d\n", MAXINT, MININT), 1); 

#define standard trace and pad sizes to reduce scaling or PDF rendering errors:
#This avoids weird aperture settings and replaces them with more standardized values.
#(I'm not sure how photoplotters handle strange sizes).
#Fewer choices here gives more accurate mapping in the final Gerber files.
#units are in inches
use constant TOOL_SIZES => #add more as desired
(
#round or square pads (> 0) and drills (< 0):
    .010, -.001,  #tiny pads for SMD; dummy drill size (too small for practical use, but needed so StandardTool will use this entry)
    .031, -.014,  #used for vias
    .041, -.020,  #smallest non-filled plated hole
    .051, -.025,
    .056, -.029,  #useful for IC pins
    .070, -.033,
    .075, -.040,  #heavier leads
#    .090, -.043,  #NOTE: 600 dpi is not high enough resolution to reliably distinguish between .043" and .046", so choose 1 of the 2 here
    .100, -.046,
    .115, -.052,
    .130, -.061,
    .140, -.067,
    .150, -.079,
    .175, -.088,
    .190, -.093,
    .200, -.100,
    .220, -.110,
    .160, -.125,  #useful for mounting holes
#some additional pad sizes without holes (repeat a previous hole size if you just want the pad size):
    .090, -.040,  #want a .090 pad option, but use dummy hole size
    .065, -.040, #.065 x .065 rect pad
    .035, -.040, #.035 x .065 rect pad
#traces:
    .001,  #too thin for real traces; use only for board outlines
    .006,  #minimum real trace width; mainly used for text
    .008,  #mainly used for mid-sized text, not traces
    .010,  #minimum recommended trace width for low-current signals
    .012,
    .015,  #moderate low-voltage current
    .020,  #heavier trace for power, ground (even if a lighter one is adequate)
    .025,
    .030,  #heavy-current traces; be careful with these ones!
    .040,
    .050,
    .060,
    .080,
    .100,
    .120,
);
#Areas larger than the values below will be filled with parallel lines:
#This cuts down on the number of aperture sizes used.
#Set to 0 to always use an aperture or drill, regardless of size.
use constant { MAX_APERTURE => max((TOOL_SIZES)) + .004, MAX_DRILL => -min((TOOL_SIZES)) + .004 }; #max aperture and drill sizes (plus a little tolerance)
#DebugPrint(sprintf("using %d standard tool sizes: %s, max aper %.3f, max drill %.3f\n", scalar((TOOL_SIZES)), join(", ", (TOOL_SIZES)), MAX_APERTURE, MAX_DRILL), 1);

#NOTE: Compare the PDF to the original CAD file to check the accuracy of the PDF rendering and parsing!
#for example, the CAD software I used generated the following circles for holes:
#CAD hole size:   parsed PDF diameter:      error:
#  .014                .016                +.002
#  .020                .02267              +.00267
#  .025                .026                +.001
#  .029                .03167              +.00267
#  .033                .036                +.003
#  .040                .04267              +.00267
#This was usually ~ .002" - .003" too big compared to the hole as displayed in the CAD software.
#To compensate for PDF rendering errors (either during CAD Print function or PDF parsing logic), adjust the values below as needed.
#units are pixels; for example, a value of 2.4 at 600 dpi = .0004 inch, 2 at 600 dpi = .0033"
use constant
{
    HOLE_ADJUST => -0.004 * 600, #-2.6, #holes seemed to be slightly oversized (by .002" - .004"), so shrink them a little
    RNDPAD_ADJUST => -0.003 * 600, #-2, #-2.4, #round pads seemed to be slightly oversized, so shrink them a little
    SQRPAD_ADJUST => +0.001 * 600, #+.5, #square pads are sometimes too small by .00067, so bump them up a little
    RECTPAD_ADJUST => 0, #(pixels) rectangular pads seem to be okay? (not tested much)
    TRACE_ADJUST => 0, #(pixels) traces seemed to be okay?
    REDUCE_TOLERANCE => .001, #(inches) allow this much variation when reducing circles and rects
};

#Also, my CAD's Print function or the PDF print driver I used was a little off for circles, so define some additional adjustment values here:
#Values are added to X/Y coordinates; units are pixels; for example, a value of 1 at 600 dpi would be ~= .002 inch
use constant
{
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MINX => 0,
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MINY => -0.001 * 600, #-1, #circles were a little too high, so nudge them a little lower
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MAXX => +0.001 * 600, #+1, #circles were a little too far to the left, so nudge them a little to the right
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MAXY => 0,
    SUBST_CIRCLE_CLIPRECT => FALSE, #generate circle and substitute for clip rects (to compensate for the way some CAD software draws circles)
    WANT_CLIPRECT => TRUE, #FALSE, #AI doesn't need clip rect at all? should be on normally?
    RECT_COMPLETION => FALSE, #TRUE, #fill in 4th side of rect when 3 sides found
};

#allow .012 clearance around pads for solder mask:
#This value effectively adjusts pad sizes in the TOOL_SIZES list above (only for solder mask layers).
use constant SOLDER_MARGIN => +.012; #units are inches

#line join/cap styles:
use constant
{
    CAP_NONE => 0, #butt (none); line is exact length
    CAP_ROUND => 1, #round cap/join; line overhangs by a semi-circle at either end
    CAP_SQUARE => 2, #square cap/join; line overhangs by a half square on either end
    CAP_OVERRIDE => FALSE, #cap style overrides drawing logic
};
    
#number of elements in each shape type:
use constant
{
    RECT_SHAPELEN => 6, #x0, y0, x1, y1, count, "rect" (start, end corners)
    LINE_SHAPELEN => 6, #x0, y0, x1, y1, count, "line" (line seg)
    CURVE_SHAPELEN => 10, #xstart, ystart, x0, y0, x1, y1, xend, yend, count, "curve" (bezier 2 points)
    CIRCLE_SHAPELEN => 5, #x, y, 5, count, "circle" (center + radius)
};
#const my %SHAPELEN =
#Readonly my %SHAPELEN =>
our %SHAPELEN =
(
    rect => RECT_SHAPELEN,
    line => LINE_SHAPELEN,
    curve => CURVE_SHAPELEN,
    circle => CIRCLE_SHAPELEN,
);

#panelization:
#This will repeat the entire body the number of times indicated along the X or Y axes (files grow accordingly).
#Display elements that overhang PCB boundary can be squashed or left as-is (typically text or other silk screen markings).
#Set "overhangs" TRUE to allow overhangs, FALSE to truncate them.
#xpad and ypad allow margins to be added around outer edge of panelized PCB.
use constant PANELIZE => {'x' => 1, 'y' => 1, 'xpad' => 0, 'ypad' => 0, 'overhangs' => TRUE}; #number of times to repeat in X and Y directions

# Set this to 1 if you need TurboCAD support.
#$turboCAD = FALSE; #is this still needed as an option?

#CIRCAD pad generation uses an appropriate aperture, then moves it (stroke) "a little" - we use this to find pads and distinguish them from PCB holes. 
use constant PAD_STROKE => 0.3; #0.0005 * 600; #units are pixels
#convert very short traces to pads or holes:
use constant TRACE_MINLEN => .001; #units are inches
#use constant ALWAYS_XY => TRUE; #FALSE; #force XY even if X or Y doesn't change; NOTE: needs to be TRUE for all pads to show in FlatCAM and ViewPlot
use constant REMOVE_POLARITY => FALSE; #TRUE; #set to remove subtractive (negative) polarity; NOTE: must be FALSE for ground planes

#PDF uses "points", each point = 1/72 inch
#combined with a PDF scale factor of .12, this gives 600 dpi resolution (1/72 * .12 = 600 dpi)
use constant INCHES_PER_POINT => 1/72; #0.0138888889; #multiply point-size by this to get inches

# The precision used when computing a bezier curve. Higher numbers are more precise but slower (and generate larger files).
#$bezierPrecision = 100;
use constant BEZIER_PRECISION => 36; #100; #use const; reduced for faster rendering (mainly used for silk screen and thermal pads)

# Ground planes and silk screen or larger copper rectangles or circles are filled line-by-line using this resolution.
use constant FILL_WIDTH => .01; #fill at most 0.01 inch at a time

# The max number of characters to read into memory
use constant MAX_BYTES => 10 * M; #bumped up to 10 MB, use const

use constant DUP_DRILL1 => TRUE; #FALSE; #kludge: ViewPlot doesn't load drill files that are too small so duplicate first tool

my $runtime = time(); #Time::HiRes::gettimeofday(); #measure my execution time

print STDERR "Loaded config settings from '${\(__FILE__)}'.\n";
1; #last value must be truthful to indicate successful load


#############################################################################################
#junk/experiment:

#use Package::Constants;
#use Exporter qw(import); #https://perldoc.perl.org/Exporter.html

#my $caller = "pdf2gerb::";

#sub cfg
#{
#    my $proto = shift;
#    my $class = ref($proto) || $proto;
#    my $settings =
#    {
#        $WANT_DEBUG => 990, #10; #level of debug wanted; higher == more, lower == less, 0 == none
#    };
#    bless($settings, $class);
#    return $settings;
#}

#use constant HELLO => "hi there2"; #"main::HELLO" => "hi there";
#use constant GOODBYE => 14; #"main::GOODBYE" => 12;

#print STDERR "read cfg file\n";

#our @EXPORT_OK = Package::Constants->list(__PACKAGE__); #https://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=1072691; NOTE: "_OK" skips short/common names

#print STDERR scalar(@EXPORT_OK) . " consts exported:\n";
#foreach(@EXPORT_OK) { print STDERR "$_\n"; }
#my $val = main::thing("xyz");
#print STDERR "caller gave me $val\n";
#foreach my $arg (@ARGV) { print STDERR "arg $arg\n"; }

Download Details:

Author: swannman
Source Code: https://github.com/swannman/pdf2gerb

License: GPL-3.0 license

#perl 

Terry  Tremblay

Terry Tremblay

1598440740

Role of Big Data in Healthcare - DZone Big Data

Much like the ‘complexity’ involved in a surgery, the volatility involved in healthcare data is so uniquely complex, that a holistic approach is needed to handle the structured and unstructured data from disparate sources within an ever-changing regulatory environment.

With the future beckoning more sources of healthcare data from patient-generated tracking from electronic devices like monitors and sensors, healthcare delivery organizations (HDOs) are under tremendous pressure to reduce the ‘cost’ of operations and storage; ‘control’ escalating costs to improve revenue & profitability; improve governance & risk management through ‘compliance,’ resulting in improved ‘cash’ flows.

Given the plethora of healthcare systems, data aggregation is essential. Organizations have been analyzing patient cost and quality data for years. Still, as healthcare moves from volume-based to value-based payment, HDOs are on the threshold of exploiting the population health hype provided they can build critical data and analytic capabilities.

Organizations work with data aggregators to pull in data from internal systems and external partners (e.g., providers pulling insurance claim data) so they can have a complete view of a patient’s or population’s data on which they can risk, stratify, and analyze quantitative and qualitative data.

Payers and providers, with an increasing need to understand complex data sets, are rapidly installing data aggregators. The industry is moving from simply looking at structured data to incorporating unstructured data, which has driven organizations to evaluate current solutions and, in many cases, rip and replace current installations with new technologies.

Organizations see value in data aggregation, but the amount of work it takes to move the data into actionable insights is substantial. The desire to infuse unstructured data and the growth of new technologies in big data in general, coupled with an industrywide need to better understand patient data, will drive significant growth. Health clouds provide a cost-effective and secure way for healthcare organizations to scale.

Information life cycle management (ILM) is finally starting to be put in practice within the HDO in targeted, practical ways. ILM used to be about controlling precipitous storage costs through better storage resource management — now it is more about recognizing that the value of information changes over time, and about how systems of record will enforce information life cycle policies.

Payers and providers rely on a variety of analytic solutions to help them understand business performance, patient populations, and provider performance. These tools allow for qualitative and quantitative analysis retrospectively, and increasingly, predictively. This area is seeing significant growth from both payers and providers, particularly as organizations seek to analyze unstructured data and do more with predictive modeling. When well implemented, analytic capabilities allow organizations to identify gaps in care and performance readily and to quantify dollars at risk.

Analytics, more than EHRs, will drive insights to action for payers and providers and help move the industry forward.

Patients or customers can get a 360-degree view of their healthcare data, thanks to digitalization. It is a win-win situation both for hospitals and the patients as they taste success using smartphones with healthcare apps and wearables. Devices that are not expensive are now part of patients’ day-to-day life. It is time HDOs expand their horizons and focus on integration and analytics rather than focusing on internal systems.

Bid data will help HDOs create a plethora of opportunities to enhance customer value and revenue as they face the ‘customer explosion’ in healthcare. As the numbers rise, big data will be the key cost differentiator either in providing care, managing population, or detecting fraud.

#big data #big data analtics #big data analysis #big data in healthcare #data science

Big Data Consulting Services | Big Data Development Experts USA

Big Data Consulting Services

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#big data consulting services #big data development experts usa #big data analytics services #big data services #best big data analytics solution provider #big data services and consulting