PostHTML: A tool To Transform HTML/XML with JS Plugins

PostHTML

PostHTML is a tool for transforming HTML/XML with JS plugins. PostHTML itself is very small. It includes only a HTML parser, a HTML node tree API and a node tree stringifier.

All HTML transformations are made by plugins. And these plugins are just small plain JS functions, which receive a HTML node tree, transform it, and return a modified tree.

Create to your project

npm init posthtml

Install

npm i -D posthtml

Usage

API

Sync

import posthtml from 'posthtml'

const html = `
  <component>
    <title>Super Title</title>
    <text>Awesome Text</text>
  </component>
`

const result = posthtml()
  .use(require('posthtml-custom-elements')())
  .process(html, { sync: true })
  .html

console.log(result)
<div class="component">
  <div class="title">Super Title</div>
  <div class="text">Awesome Text</div>
</div>

⚠️ Async Plugins can't be used in sync mode and will throw an Error. It's recommended to use PostHTML asynchronously whenever possible.

Async

import posthtml from 'posthtml'

const html = `
  <html>
    <body>
      <p class="wow">OMG</p>
    </body>
  </html>
`

posthtml(
  [
    require('posthtml-to-svg-tags')(),
    require('posthtml-extend-attrs')({
      attrsTree: {
        '.wow' : {
          id: 'wow_id',
          fill: '#4A83B4',
          'fill-rule': 'evenodd',
          'font-family': 'Verdana'
        }
      }
    })
  ])
  .process(html/*, options */)
  .then((result) =>  console.log(result.html))
<svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg">
  <text
    class="wow"
    id="wow_id"
    fill="#4A83B4"
    fill-rule="evenodd" font-family="Verdana">
      OMG
  </text>
</svg>

Directives

import posthtml from 'posthtml'

const php = `
  <component>
    <title><?php echo $title; ?></title>
    <text><?php echo $article; ?></text>
  </component>
`

const result = posthtml()
  .use(require('posthtml-custom-elements')())
  .process(html, {
    directives: [
      { name: '?php', start: '<', end: '>' }
    ]
  })
  .html

console.log(result)
<div class="component">
  <div class="title"><?php echo $title; ?></div>
  <div class="text"><?php echo $article; ?></div>
</div>

CLI

npm i posthtml-cli
"scripts": {
  "posthtml": "posthtml -o output.html -i input.html -c config.json"
}
npm run posthtml

Gulp

npm i -D gulp-posthtml
import tap from 'gulp-tap'
import posthtml from 'gulp-posthtml'
import { task, src, dest } from 'gulp'

task('html', () => {
  let path

  const plugins = [ require('posthtml-include')({ root: `${path}` }) ]
  const options = {}

  src('src/**/*.html')
    .pipe(tap((file) => path = file.path))
    .pipe(posthtml(plugins, options))
    .pipe(dest('build/'))
})

Check project-stub for an example with Gulp

Grunt

npm i -D grunt-posthtml
posthtml: {
  options: {
    use: [
      require('posthtml-doctype')({ doctype: 'HTML 5' }),
      require('posthtml-include')({ root: './', encoding: 'utf-8' })
    ]
  },
  build: {
    files: [
      {
        dot: true,
        cwd: 'html/',
        src: ['*.html'],
        dest: 'tmp/',
        expand: true,
      }
    ]
  }
}

Webpack

npm i -D html-loader posthtml-loader

v1.x

webpack.config.js

const config = {
  module: {
    loaders: [
      {
        test: /\.html$/,
        loader: 'html!posthtml'
      }
    ]
  },
  posthtml: (ctx) => ({
    parser: require('posthtml-pug'),
    plugins: [
      require('posthtml-bem')()
    ]
  })
}

export default config

v2.x

webpack.config.js

import { LoaderOptionsPlugin } from 'webpack'

const config = {
  module: {
    rules: [
      {
        test: /\.html$/,
        use: [
          {
            loader: 'html-loader',
            options: { minimize: true }
          },
          {
            loader: 'posthtml-loader'
          }
        ]
      }
    ]
  },
  plugins: [
    new LoaderOptionsPlugin({
      options: {
        posthtml(ctx) {
          return {
            parser: require('posthtml-pug'),
            plugins: [
              require('posthtml-bem')()
            ]
          }
        }
      }
    })
  ]
}

export default config

Rollup

$ npm i rollup-plugin-posthtml -D
# or
$ npm i rollup-plugin-posthtml-template -D
import { join } from 'path';

import posthtml from 'rollup-plugin-posthtml-template';
// or
// import posthtml from 'rollup-plugin-posthtml';

import sugarml from 'posthtml-sugarml';  // npm i posthtml-sugarml -D
import include from 'posthtml-include';  // npm i posthtml-include -D

export default {
  entry: join(__dirname, 'main.js'),
  dest: join(__dirname, 'bundle.js'),
  format: 'iife',
  plugins: [
    posthtml({
      parser: sugarml(),
      plugins: [include()],
      template: true  // only rollup-plugin-posthtml-template
    })
  ]
};

Parser

import pug from 'posthtml-pug' posthtml().process(html, { parser: pug(options) }).then((result) => result.html)

NameStatusDescription
posthtml-pugnpmPug Parser
sugarmlnpmSugarML Parser

Plugins

In case you want to develop your own plugin, we recommend using posthtml-plugin-starter to get started.

For more detailed information about PostHTML in general take a look at the docs.

Dependencies

NameStatusDescription
posthtml-parsernpmParser HTML/XML to PostHTMLTree
posthtml-rendernpmRender PostHTMLTree to HTML/XML

Download Details:

Author: posthtml
Source Code: https://github.com/posthtml/posthtml 
License: MIT license

#javascript #html #xml #transformer 

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

PostHTML: A tool To Transform HTML/XML with JS Plugins

NBB: Ad-hoc CLJS Scripting on Node.js

Nbb

Not babashka. Node.js babashka!?

Ad-hoc CLJS scripting on Node.js.

Status

Experimental. Please report issues here.

Goals and features

Nbb's main goal is to make it easy to get started with ad hoc CLJS scripting on Node.js.

Additional goals and features are:

  • Fast startup without relying on a custom version of Node.js.
  • Small artifact (current size is around 1.2MB).
  • First class macros.
  • Support building small TUI apps using Reagent.
  • Complement babashka with libraries from the Node.js ecosystem.

Requirements

Nbb requires Node.js v12 or newer.

How does this tool work?

CLJS code is evaluated through SCI, the same interpreter that powers babashka. Because SCI works with advanced compilation, the bundle size, especially when combined with other dependencies, is smaller than what you get with self-hosted CLJS. That makes startup faster. The trade-off is that execution is less performant and that only a subset of CLJS is available (e.g. no deftype, yet).

Usage

Install nbb from NPM:

$ npm install nbb -g

Omit -g for a local install.

Try out an expression:

$ nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'
6

And then install some other NPM libraries to use in the script. E.g.:

$ npm install csv-parse shelljs zx

Create a script which uses the NPM libraries:

(ns script
  (:require ["csv-parse/lib/sync$default" :as csv-parse]
            ["fs" :as fs]
            ["path" :as path]
            ["shelljs$default" :as sh]
            ["term-size$default" :as term-size]
            ["zx$default" :as zx]
            ["zx$fs" :as zxfs]
            [nbb.core :refer [*file*]]))

(prn (path/resolve "."))

(prn (term-size))

(println (count (str (fs/readFileSync *file*))))

(prn (sh/ls "."))

(prn (csv-parse "foo,bar"))

(prn (zxfs/existsSync *file*))

(zx/$ #js ["ls"])

Call the script:

$ nbb script.cljs
"/private/tmp/test-script"
#js {:columns 216, :rows 47}
510
#js ["node_modules" "package-lock.json" "package.json" "script.cljs"]
#js [#js ["foo" "bar"]]
true
$ ls
node_modules
package-lock.json
package.json
script.cljs

Macros

Nbb has first class support for macros: you can define them right inside your .cljs file, like you are used to from JVM Clojure. Consider the plet macro to make working with promises more palatable:

(defmacro plet
  [bindings & body]
  (let [binding-pairs (reverse (partition 2 bindings))
        body (cons 'do body)]
    (reduce (fn [body [sym expr]]
              (let [expr (list '.resolve 'js/Promise expr)]
                (list '.then expr (list 'clojure.core/fn (vector sym)
                                        body))))
            body
            binding-pairs)))

Using this macro we can look async code more like sync code. Consider this puppeteer example:

(-> (.launch puppeteer)
      (.then (fn [browser]
               (-> (.newPage browser)
                   (.then (fn [page]
                            (-> (.goto page "https://clojure.org")
                                (.then #(.screenshot page #js{:path "screenshot.png"}))
                                (.catch #(js/console.log %))
                                (.then #(.close browser)))))))))

Using plet this becomes:

(plet [browser (.launch puppeteer)
       page (.newPage browser)
       _ (.goto page "https://clojure.org")
       _ (-> (.screenshot page #js{:path "screenshot.png"})
             (.catch #(js/console.log %)))]
      (.close browser))

See the puppeteer example for the full code.

Since v0.0.36, nbb includes promesa which is a library to deal with promises. The above plet macro is similar to promesa.core/let.

Startup time

$ time nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'
6
nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'   0.17s  user 0.02s system 109% cpu 0.168 total

The baseline startup time for a script is about 170ms seconds on my laptop. When invoked via npx this adds another 300ms or so, so for faster startup, either use a globally installed nbb or use $(npm bin)/nbb script.cljs to bypass npx.

Dependencies

NPM dependencies

Nbb does not depend on any NPM dependencies. All NPM libraries loaded by a script are resolved relative to that script. When using the Reagent module, React is resolved in the same way as any other NPM library.

Classpath

To load .cljs files from local paths or dependencies, you can use the --classpath argument. The current dir is added to the classpath automatically. So if there is a file foo/bar.cljs relative to your current dir, then you can load it via (:require [foo.bar :as fb]). Note that nbb uses the same naming conventions for namespaces and directories as other Clojure tools: foo-bar in the namespace name becomes foo_bar in the directory name.

To load dependencies from the Clojure ecosystem, you can use the Clojure CLI or babashka to download them and produce a classpath:

$ classpath="$(clojure -A:nbb -Spath -Sdeps '{:aliases {:nbb {:replace-deps {com.github.seancorfield/honeysql {:git/tag "v2.0.0-rc5" :git/sha "01c3a55"}}}}}')"

and then feed it to the --classpath argument:

$ nbb --classpath "$classpath" -e "(require '[honey.sql :as sql]) (sql/format {:select :foo :from :bar :where [:= :baz 2]})"
["SELECT foo FROM bar WHERE baz = ?" 2]

Currently nbb only reads from directories, not jar files, so you are encouraged to use git libs. Support for .jar files will be added later.

Current file

The name of the file that is currently being executed is available via nbb.core/*file* or on the metadata of vars:

(ns foo
  (:require [nbb.core :refer [*file*]]))

(prn *file*) ;; "/private/tmp/foo.cljs"

(defn f [])
(prn (:file (meta #'f))) ;; "/private/tmp/foo.cljs"

Reagent

Nbb includes reagent.core which will be lazily loaded when required. You can use this together with ink to create a TUI application:

$ npm install ink

ink-demo.cljs:

(ns ink-demo
  (:require ["ink" :refer [render Text]]
            [reagent.core :as r]))

(defonce state (r/atom 0))

(doseq [n (range 1 11)]
  (js/setTimeout #(swap! state inc) (* n 500)))

(defn hello []
  [:> Text {:color "green"} "Hello, world! " @state])

(render (r/as-element [hello]))

Promesa

Working with callbacks and promises can become tedious. Since nbb v0.0.36 the promesa.core namespace is included with the let and do! macros. An example:

(ns prom
  (:require [promesa.core :as p]))

(defn sleep [ms]
  (js/Promise.
   (fn [resolve _]
     (js/setTimeout resolve ms))))

(defn do-stuff
  []
  (p/do!
   (println "Doing stuff which takes a while")
   (sleep 1000)
   1))

(p/let [a (do-stuff)
        b (inc a)
        c (do-stuff)
        d (+ b c)]
  (prn d))
$ nbb prom.cljs
Doing stuff which takes a while
Doing stuff which takes a while
3

Also see API docs.

Js-interop

Since nbb v0.0.75 applied-science/js-interop is available:

(ns example
  (:require [applied-science.js-interop :as j]))

(def o (j/lit {:a 1 :b 2 :c {:d 1}}))

(prn (j/select-keys o [:a :b])) ;; #js {:a 1, :b 2}
(prn (j/get-in o [:c :d])) ;; 1

Most of this library is supported in nbb, except the following:

  • destructuring using :syms
  • property access using .-x notation. In nbb, you must use keywords.

See the example of what is currently supported.

Examples

See the examples directory for small examples.

Also check out these projects built with nbb:

API

See API documentation.

Migrating to shadow-cljs

See this gist on how to convert an nbb script or project to shadow-cljs.

Build

Prequisites:

  • babashka >= 0.4.0
  • Clojure CLI >= 1.10.3.933
  • Node.js 16.5.0 (lower version may work, but this is the one I used to build)

To build:

  • Clone and cd into this repo
  • bb release

Run bb tasks for more project-related tasks.

Download Details:
Author: borkdude
Download Link: Download The Source Code
Official Website: https://github.com/borkdude/nbb 
License: EPL-1.0

#node #javascript

PostHTML: A tool To Transform HTML/XML with JS Plugins

PostHTML

PostHTML is a tool for transforming HTML/XML with JS plugins. PostHTML itself is very small. It includes only a HTML parser, a HTML node tree API and a node tree stringifier.

All HTML transformations are made by plugins. And these plugins are just small plain JS functions, which receive a HTML node tree, transform it, and return a modified tree.

Create to your project

npm init posthtml

Install

npm i -D posthtml

Usage

API

Sync

import posthtml from 'posthtml'

const html = `
  <component>
    <title>Super Title</title>
    <text>Awesome Text</text>
  </component>
`

const result = posthtml()
  .use(require('posthtml-custom-elements')())
  .process(html, { sync: true })
  .html

console.log(result)
<div class="component">
  <div class="title">Super Title</div>
  <div class="text">Awesome Text</div>
</div>

⚠️ Async Plugins can't be used in sync mode and will throw an Error. It's recommended to use PostHTML asynchronously whenever possible.

Async

import posthtml from 'posthtml'

const html = `
  <html>
    <body>
      <p class="wow">OMG</p>
    </body>
  </html>
`

posthtml(
  [
    require('posthtml-to-svg-tags')(),
    require('posthtml-extend-attrs')({
      attrsTree: {
        '.wow' : {
          id: 'wow_id',
          fill: '#4A83B4',
          'fill-rule': 'evenodd',
          'font-family': 'Verdana'
        }
      }
    })
  ])
  .process(html/*, options */)
  .then((result) =>  console.log(result.html))
<svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg">
  <text
    class="wow"
    id="wow_id"
    fill="#4A83B4"
    fill-rule="evenodd" font-family="Verdana">
      OMG
  </text>
</svg>

Directives

import posthtml from 'posthtml'

const php = `
  <component>
    <title><?php echo $title; ?></title>
    <text><?php echo $article; ?></text>
  </component>
`

const result = posthtml()
  .use(require('posthtml-custom-elements')())
  .process(html, {
    directives: [
      { name: '?php', start: '<', end: '>' }
    ]
  })
  .html

console.log(result)
<div class="component">
  <div class="title"><?php echo $title; ?></div>
  <div class="text"><?php echo $article; ?></div>
</div>

CLI

npm i posthtml-cli
"scripts": {
  "posthtml": "posthtml -o output.html -i input.html -c config.json"
}
npm run posthtml

Gulp

npm i -D gulp-posthtml
import tap from 'gulp-tap'
import posthtml from 'gulp-posthtml'
import { task, src, dest } from 'gulp'

task('html', () => {
  let path

  const plugins = [ require('posthtml-include')({ root: `${path}` }) ]
  const options = {}

  src('src/**/*.html')
    .pipe(tap((file) => path = file.path))
    .pipe(posthtml(plugins, options))
    .pipe(dest('build/'))
})

Check project-stub for an example with Gulp

Grunt

npm i -D grunt-posthtml
posthtml: {
  options: {
    use: [
      require('posthtml-doctype')({ doctype: 'HTML 5' }),
      require('posthtml-include')({ root: './', encoding: 'utf-8' })
    ]
  },
  build: {
    files: [
      {
        dot: true,
        cwd: 'html/',
        src: ['*.html'],
        dest: 'tmp/',
        expand: true,
      }
    ]
  }
}

Webpack

npm i -D html-loader posthtml-loader

v1.x

webpack.config.js

const config = {
  module: {
    loaders: [
      {
        test: /\.html$/,
        loader: 'html!posthtml'
      }
    ]
  },
  posthtml: (ctx) => ({
    parser: require('posthtml-pug'),
    plugins: [
      require('posthtml-bem')()
    ]
  })
}

export default config

v2.x

webpack.config.js

import { LoaderOptionsPlugin } from 'webpack'

const config = {
  module: {
    rules: [
      {
        test: /\.html$/,
        use: [
          {
            loader: 'html-loader',
            options: { minimize: true }
          },
          {
            loader: 'posthtml-loader'
          }
        ]
      }
    ]
  },
  plugins: [
    new LoaderOptionsPlugin({
      options: {
        posthtml(ctx) {
          return {
            parser: require('posthtml-pug'),
            plugins: [
              require('posthtml-bem')()
            ]
          }
        }
      }
    })
  ]
}

export default config

Rollup

$ npm i rollup-plugin-posthtml -D
# or
$ npm i rollup-plugin-posthtml-template -D
import { join } from 'path';

import posthtml from 'rollup-plugin-posthtml-template';
// or
// import posthtml from 'rollup-plugin-posthtml';

import sugarml from 'posthtml-sugarml';  // npm i posthtml-sugarml -D
import include from 'posthtml-include';  // npm i posthtml-include -D

export default {
  entry: join(__dirname, 'main.js'),
  dest: join(__dirname, 'bundle.js'),
  format: 'iife',
  plugins: [
    posthtml({
      parser: sugarml(),
      plugins: [include()],
      template: true  // only rollup-plugin-posthtml-template
    })
  ]
};

Parser

import pug from 'posthtml-pug' posthtml().process(html, { parser: pug(options) }).then((result) => result.html)

NameStatusDescription
posthtml-pugnpmPug Parser
sugarmlnpmSugarML Parser

Plugins

In case you want to develop your own plugin, we recommend using posthtml-plugin-starter to get started.

For more detailed information about PostHTML in general take a look at the docs.

Dependencies

NameStatusDescription
posthtml-parsernpmParser HTML/XML to PostHTMLTree
posthtml-rendernpmRender PostHTMLTree to HTML/XML

Download Details:

Author: posthtml
Source Code: https://github.com/posthtml/posthtml 
License: MIT license

#javascript #html #xml #transformer 

Ava Watson

Ava Watson

1595318322

Know Everything About HTML With HTML Experts

HTML stands for a hypertext markup language. For the designs to be displayed in web browser HTML is the markup language. Technologies like Cascading style sheets (CSS) and scripting languages such as JavaScript assist HTML. With the help of HTML websites and the web, designs are created. Html has a wide range of academic applications. HTML has a series of elements. HTML helps to display web content. Its elements tell the web how to display the contents.

The document component of HTML is known as an HTML element. HTML element helps in displaying the web pages. An HTML document is a mixture of text nodes and HTML elements.

Basics of HTML are-

The simple fundamental components oh HTML is

  1. Head- the setup information for the program and web pages is carried in the head
  2. Body- the actual substance that is to be shown on the web page is carried in the body
  3. HTML- information starts and ends with and labels.
  4. Comments- come up in between

Html versions timeline

  1. HTML was created in 1990. Html is a program that is updated regularly. the timeline for the HTML versions is
  2. HTML 2- November, 1995
  3. HTML 3- January, 1997
  4. HTML 4- December, 1997; April, 1998; December, 1999; May, 2000
  5. HTML 5- October, 2014; November, 2016; December, 2017

HTML draft version timelines are

  1. October 1991
  2. June 1992
  3. November 1992
  4. June 1993
  5. November 1993
  6. November 1994
  7. April 1995
  8. January 2008
  9. HTML 5-
    2011, last call
    2012 candidate recommendation
    2014 proposed recommendation and recommendation

HTML helps in creating web pages. In web pages, there are texts, pictures, colouring schemes, tables, and a variety of other things. HTML allows all these on a web page.
There are a lot of attributes in HTML. It may get difficult to memorize these attributes. HTML is a tricky concept. Sometimes it gets difficult to find a single mistake that doesn’t let the web page function properly.

Many minor things are to be kept in mind in HTML. To complete an HTML assignment, it is always advisable to seek help from online experts. These experts are well trained and acknowledged with the subject. They provide quality content within the prescribed deadline. With several positive reviews, the online expert help for HTML assignment is highly recommended.

#html assignment help #html assignment writing help #online html assignment writing help #html assignment help service online #what is html #about html

Ssekidde  Nat

Ssekidde Nat

1620203018

HTML Vs XML: Difference Between HTML and XML [2021]

HTML’s full form is Hypertext Markup Language, while XML is an Extensible Markup Language. The purpose of HTML is to display data and focus on how the data looks. Therefore, HTML describes a web page’s structure and displays information, whereas XML structures, stores, and transfers information and describes what the data is.

In this article, HTML and XML shall be discussed in detail to understand the differences between them.

What is HTML?

Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) is a programming language that displays data and describes a web page’s structure. Hypertext facilitates browsing the web by referring to the hyperlinks an HTML page contains. The hyperlink enables one to go to any place on the internet by clicking it. There is no set order to do so.

What is XML?

Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a programming language created by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). XML facilitates encoding documents, defined by a set of rules, in a format that can be read by both humans and machines. By using tags, XML defines the document structure, how it should be stored and transported. It enables the creation of web applications and web pages and is a dynamic language that transports data. It’s often used as the basis for many other document formats, some of which are as follows.

#html #html vs xml #xml

Wasswa  Meagan

Wasswa Meagan

1619678404

HTML Vs XML: Difference Between HTML and XML [2021]

HTML’s full form is Hypertext Markup Language, while XML is an Extensible Markup Language. The purpose of HTML is to display data and focus on how the data looks. Therefore, HTML describes a web page’s structure and displays information, whereas XML structures, stores, and transfers information and describes what the data is.

In this article, HTML and XML shall be discussed in detail to understand the differences between them.

What is HTML?

Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) is a programming language that displays data and describes a web page’s structure. Hypertext facilitates browsing the web by referring to the hyperlinks an HTML page contains. The hyperlink enables one to go to any place on the internet by clicking it. There is no set order to do so.

Markup language points out to the way tags are used in defining the page layout and the elements within the page. It consists of various HTML elements comprising tags and their content. HTML language enables the creation of links of documents, is static, and can ignore small errors. In HTML, closing tags are not necessary. It can be defined as a markup language that makes the text more dynamic and interactive.

#software development #html #html vs xml #xml