Ron  Cartwright

Ron Cartwright

1597456800

SSH Is Dead. Long Live SSH: One Million SSH Logins With Okta. Zero SSH Keys.

As the great Mark Twain once wrote in response to reading his own obituary in May of 1897 , “reports of my death have been greatly exaggerated.” Fast forward nearly a hundred years to 1995, and a Finnish computer scientist named Tatu Ylönen created a secure transport protocol known simply as Secure Shell (SSH). What do these things have to do with each other? Nothing, aside from perception.

In its most practical terms, SSH enables users to establish a secure, remote connection with a Linux-based machine via a Command Line Interface (CLI). SSH is the de facto standard for secure server access, and has survived the test of time, despite a significant shift in how infrastructure is operated in the cloud.

At Okta, we embrace the shift towards the cloud operating model, where resources are dynamic and ephemeral, by adapting the underlying security properties of SSH to fit. Our customers use Okta Advanced Server Access  (Okta ASA) to securely automate identity and access controls for their teams to use SSH safely. And we’ve just reached a significant adoption milestone by registering over 1 million SSH logins per month… and growing!

In this post, I’d like to talk through some of the trends surrounding the cloud operating model, the continued role SSH plays in securing remote access, and how Okta has helped our customers elegantly solve a nagging pain point.

With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility

As the de facto standard for remote access to Linux servers, SSH is naturally a common target for attackers attempting to infiltrate a company’s network. The transport protocol is inherently secure; however, the backing credential mechanism is prone to human error-with potentially catastrophic results. SSH Keys, which are cryptographic key pairs designed to be an attestation of trust, require great care to ensure they don’t fall into the wrong hands. There is no way to guarantee a link between an SSH Key and an identity, so in many ways, possession is 10-tenths of the law.

As such, companies have traditionally been forced to do one of the following:

  • Implement a security policy for users to regularly manage and rotate their personal SSH Keys (easiest, least secure).
  • Operate a secure vault service that can store SSH Keys, checked out on demand (harder, more secure).
  • Purchase and deploy a privileged access management product to act as a gateway for remote access (hardest, most secure).

I imagine you can see the pattern here: as with so many things, you get out what you put into it. But look, security is changing, and fast. First of all, the hardest solution isn’t always the most secure, but more importantly, who has time for all that extra hard work??!! We’re all forced to do more with less, but security teams also have the added challenge of protecting the company without getting in the way of the business. Not an easy thing to be on the hook for by any means.

We understand this continued balancing act, and design our products to be the most secure and easiest to use solution on the market. Before we get to the details of how we enable our customers to achieve a better outcome with Okta ASA, I’d like to address the perception that SSH is dead in the modern cloud era.

The Kubernetes Challenge

With the shift towards the cloud operating model, Kubernetes has emerged as everyone’s favorite _configuration management plane/orchestration layer/CLI/runtime/service mesh/dev environment _ platform. Here’s a phrase I sometimes hear, “We’re all in on Kubernetes, we won’t need SSH access anymore.”

That sure sounds like a dream: a unified abstraction layer that removes all human interaction from managing elastic, multi-cloud infrastructure. Kubernetes is certainly poised to become the proverbial operating system of the cloud, but it does introduce a whole new set of complexities and considerations. Here’s a small sampling of scenarios where human interaction is still required:

  • Logging into underlying hosts to run diagnostics scripts, inspect logs, debug network issues, etc.
  • Writing and debugging YAML code to describe and configure target environments, services, runtimes, etc.
  • Monitoring performance of networks, infrastructure, services, etc.

Standing strong and tall amidst all this innovation and change is SSH, because you just can’t replace that sturdy, direct connection between a user and a host operating system. Even the most automated of environments needs human access in case of emergency, but there’s more to it than that-automation needs security controls too. SSH still fits the bill for both human and service-level access.

The mental picture we all likely have in our heads here is a systems administrator sitting at their desk, connecting to a single Linux server from their terminal by typing, "ssh ". While the direct user-to-server login is a common use case, the use of SSH is also prevalent in:

  • Developers writing and running scripts that connect to many servers at once to run a series of diagnostic tests
  • Configuration Management software (Terraform, Chef, Puppet, Ansible, etc.) that connect to target hosts to make local changes
  • CI/CD automation tools that connect to production servers to configure runtimes and push software builds

Let’s revisit the problem with SSH Keys. The traditional PKI (Public Key Infrastructure) that backs SSH was built for a different time, where a key exchange meant enough to grant trust. The core problem lies with the false assumption that ownership of a private key equates to an identity profile. While we may say “Alice’s private key”, there’s no associated authentication process that could verify it was Alice, who generated the key pair to begin with, or that Alice is the only person who currently possesses the private key.

As these keys get issued and distributed across fleets of dynamic infrastructure and cloud services, the challenge only compounds. Each public key accrues more privileges over time; the longer it’s been alive, the more likely it’s been shared with a resource, making it extremely difficult to track and subsequently revoke. With this model, time is a bug that can’t be fixed.

In a Zero Trust world, a meaningful trust attestation is correctly adhering to a policy that states a person (or service) from a known device can access a specific resource at a given time. It’s not necessarily about the credential itself, it’s about the context surrounding the request. Even so, we still need a way to represent the identity and permissions associated with the attestation that was made.

#cloud #security #kubernetes #ssh #okta asa

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Buddha Community

SSH Is Dead. Long Live SSH: One Million SSH Logins With Okta. Zero SSH Keys.
Ron  Cartwright

Ron Cartwright

1597456800

SSH Is Dead. Long Live SSH: One Million SSH Logins With Okta. Zero SSH Keys.

As the great Mark Twain once wrote in response to reading his own obituary in May of 1897 , “reports of my death have been greatly exaggerated.” Fast forward nearly a hundred years to 1995, and a Finnish computer scientist named Tatu Ylönen created a secure transport protocol known simply as Secure Shell (SSH). What do these things have to do with each other? Nothing, aside from perception.

In its most practical terms, SSH enables users to establish a secure, remote connection with a Linux-based machine via a Command Line Interface (CLI). SSH is the de facto standard for secure server access, and has survived the test of time, despite a significant shift in how infrastructure is operated in the cloud.

At Okta, we embrace the shift towards the cloud operating model, where resources are dynamic and ephemeral, by adapting the underlying security properties of SSH to fit. Our customers use Okta Advanced Server Access  (Okta ASA) to securely automate identity and access controls for their teams to use SSH safely. And we’ve just reached a significant adoption milestone by registering over 1 million SSH logins per month… and growing!

In this post, I’d like to talk through some of the trends surrounding the cloud operating model, the continued role SSH plays in securing remote access, and how Okta has helped our customers elegantly solve a nagging pain point.

With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility

As the de facto standard for remote access to Linux servers, SSH is naturally a common target for attackers attempting to infiltrate a company’s network. The transport protocol is inherently secure; however, the backing credential mechanism is prone to human error-with potentially catastrophic results. SSH Keys, which are cryptographic key pairs designed to be an attestation of trust, require great care to ensure they don’t fall into the wrong hands. There is no way to guarantee a link between an SSH Key and an identity, so in many ways, possession is 10-tenths of the law.

As such, companies have traditionally been forced to do one of the following:

  • Implement a security policy for users to regularly manage and rotate their personal SSH Keys (easiest, least secure).
  • Operate a secure vault service that can store SSH Keys, checked out on demand (harder, more secure).
  • Purchase and deploy a privileged access management product to act as a gateway for remote access (hardest, most secure).

I imagine you can see the pattern here: as with so many things, you get out what you put into it. But look, security is changing, and fast. First of all, the hardest solution isn’t always the most secure, but more importantly, who has time for all that extra hard work??!! We’re all forced to do more with less, but security teams also have the added challenge of protecting the company without getting in the way of the business. Not an easy thing to be on the hook for by any means.

We understand this continued balancing act, and design our products to be the most secure and easiest to use solution on the market. Before we get to the details of how we enable our customers to achieve a better outcome with Okta ASA, I’d like to address the perception that SSH is dead in the modern cloud era.

The Kubernetes Challenge

With the shift towards the cloud operating model, Kubernetes has emerged as everyone’s favorite _configuration management plane/orchestration layer/CLI/runtime/service mesh/dev environment _ platform. Here’s a phrase I sometimes hear, “We’re all in on Kubernetes, we won’t need SSH access anymore.”

That sure sounds like a dream: a unified abstraction layer that removes all human interaction from managing elastic, multi-cloud infrastructure. Kubernetes is certainly poised to become the proverbial operating system of the cloud, but it does introduce a whole new set of complexities and considerations. Here’s a small sampling of scenarios where human interaction is still required:

  • Logging into underlying hosts to run diagnostics scripts, inspect logs, debug network issues, etc.
  • Writing and debugging YAML code to describe and configure target environments, services, runtimes, etc.
  • Monitoring performance of networks, infrastructure, services, etc.

Standing strong and tall amidst all this innovation and change is SSH, because you just can’t replace that sturdy, direct connection between a user and a host operating system. Even the most automated of environments needs human access in case of emergency, but there’s more to it than that-automation needs security controls too. SSH still fits the bill for both human and service-level access.

The mental picture we all likely have in our heads here is a systems administrator sitting at their desk, connecting to a single Linux server from their terminal by typing, "ssh ". While the direct user-to-server login is a common use case, the use of SSH is also prevalent in:

  • Developers writing and running scripts that connect to many servers at once to run a series of diagnostic tests
  • Configuration Management software (Terraform, Chef, Puppet, Ansible, etc.) that connect to target hosts to make local changes
  • CI/CD automation tools that connect to production servers to configure runtimes and push software builds

Let’s revisit the problem with SSH Keys. The traditional PKI (Public Key Infrastructure) that backs SSH was built for a different time, where a key exchange meant enough to grant trust. The core problem lies with the false assumption that ownership of a private key equates to an identity profile. While we may say “Alice’s private key”, there’s no associated authentication process that could verify it was Alice, who generated the key pair to begin with, or that Alice is the only person who currently possesses the private key.

As these keys get issued and distributed across fleets of dynamic infrastructure and cloud services, the challenge only compounds. Each public key accrues more privileges over time; the longer it’s been alive, the more likely it’s been shared with a resource, making it extremely difficult to track and subsequently revoke. With this model, time is a bug that can’t be fixed.

In a Zero Trust world, a meaningful trust attestation is correctly adhering to a policy that states a person (or service) from a known device can access a specific resource at a given time. It’s not necessarily about the credential itself, it’s about the context surrounding the request. Even so, we still need a way to represent the identity and permissions associated with the attestation that was made.

#cloud #security #kubernetes #ssh #okta asa

Long Live SSH: One Million SSH Logins With Okta.

As the great Mark Twain once wrote in response to reading his own obituary in May of 1897 , “reports of my death have been greatly exaggerated.” Fast forward nearly a hundred years to 1995, and a Finnish computer scientist named Tatu Ylönen created a secure transport protocol known simply as Secure Shell (SSH). What do these things have to do with each other? Nothing, aside from perception.

In its most practical terms, SSH enables users to establish a secure, remote connection with a Linux-based machine via a Command Line Interface (CLI). SSH is the de facto standard for secure server access, and has survived the test of time, despite a significant shift in how infrastructure is operated in the cloud.

At Okta, we embrace the shift towards the cloud operating model, where resources are dynamic and ephemeral, by adapting the underlying security properties of SSH to fit. Our customers use Okta Advanced Server Access  (Okta ASA) to securely automate identity and access controls for their teams to use SSH safely. And we’ve just reached a significant adoption milestone by registering over 1 million SSH logins per month… and growing!

In this post, I’d like to talk through some of the trends surrounding the cloud operating model, the continued role SSH plays in securing remote access, and how Okta has helped our customers elegantly solve a nagging pain point.

With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility

As the de facto standard for remote access to Linux servers, SSH is naturally a common target for attackers attempting to infiltrate a company’s network. The transport protocol is inherently secure; however, the backing credential mechanism is prone to human error-with potentially catastrophic results. SSH Keys, which are cryptographic key pairs designed to be an attestation of trust, require great care to ensure they don’t fall into the wrong hands. There is no way to guarantee a link between an SSH Key and an identity, so in many ways, possession is 10-tenths of the law.

As such, companies have traditionally been forced to do one of the following:

  • Implement a security policy for users to regularly manage and rotate their personal SSH Keys (easiest, least secure).
  • Operate a secure vault service that can store SSH Keys, checked out on demand (harder, more secure).
  • Purchase and deploy a privileged access management product to act as a gateway for remote access (hardest, most secure).

I imagine you can see the pattern here: as with so many things, you get out what you put into it. But look, security is changing, and fast. First of all, the hardest solution isn’t always the most secure, but more importantly, who has time for all that extra hard work??!! We’re all forced to do more with less, but security teams also have the added challenge of protecting the company without getting in the way of the business. Not an easy thing to be on the hook for by any means.

We understand this continued balancing act, and design our products to be the most secure and easiest to use solution on the market. Before we get to the details of how we enable our customers to achieve a better outcome with Okta ASA, I’d like to address the perception that SSH is dead in the modern cloud era.

The Kubernetes Challenge

With the shift towards the cloud operating model, Kubernetes has emerged as everyone’s favorite _configuration management plane/orchestration layer/CLI/runtime/service mesh/dev environment _ platform. Here’s a phrase I sometimes hear, “We’re all in on Kubernetes, we won’t need SSH access anymore.”

That sure sounds like a dream: a unified abstraction layer that removes all human interaction from managing elastic, multi-cloud infrastructure. Kubernetes is certainly poised to become the proverbial operating system of the cloud, but it does introduce a whole new set of complexities and considerations. Here’s a small sampling of scenarios where human interaction is still required:

  • Logging into underlying hosts to run diagnostics scripts, inspect logs, debug network issues, etc.
  • Writing and debugging YAML code to describe and configure target environments, services, runtimes, etc.
  • Monitoring performance of networks, infrastructure, services, etc.

Standing strong and tall amidst all this innovation and change is SSH, because you just can’t replace that sturdy, direct connection between a user and a host operating system. Even the most automated of environments needs human access in case of emergency, but there’s more to it than that-automation needs security controls too. SSH still fits the bill for both human and service-level access.

The mental picture we all likely have in our heads here is a systems administrator sitting at their desk, connecting to a single Linux server from their terminal by typing, "ssh ". While the direct user-to-server login is a common use case, the use of SSH is also prevalent in:

  • Developers writing and running scripts that connect to many servers at once to run a series of diagnostic tests
  • Configuration Management software (Terraform, Chef, Puppet, Ansible, etc.) that connect to target hosts to make local changes
  • CI/CD automation tools that connect to production servers to configure runtimes and push software builds

Let’s revisit the problem with SSH Keys. The traditional PKI (Public Key Infrastructure) that backs SSH was built for a different time, where a key exchange meant enough to grant trust. The core problem lies with the false assumption that ownership of a private key equates to an identity profile. While we may say “Alice’s private key”, there’s no associated authentication process that could verify it was Alice, who generated the key pair to begin with, or that Alice is the only person who currently possesses the private key.

As these keys get issued and distributed across fleets of dynamic infrastructure and cloud services, the challenge only compounds. Each public key accrues more privileges over time; the longer it’s been alive, the more likely it’s been shared with a resource, making it extremely difficult to track and subsequently revoke. With this model, time is a bug that can’t be fixed.

In a Zero Trust world, a meaningful trust attestation is correctly adhering to a policy that states a person (or service) from a known device can access a specific resource at a given time. It’s not necessarily about the credential itself, it’s about the context surrounding the request. Even so, we still need a way to represent the identity and permissions associated with the attestation that was made.

#cloud #security #kubernetes #ssh #okta asa #cloud

Ethen Ellen

1619280312

Fix Windows Live Mail Login Problems | Call +1-888-857-5157

This is image title

When you are trying to login into Windows Live Mail Account and you forget your login credentials, then you are unable to access your account. If you want immediate help to fix Windows Live Mail Login Problems, so you can dial our toll-free number and talk to our email expert customer support team. Our team of professionals provides an exact solution related to your own issues. We are always ready to guide you in any possible manner.

How To Fix Windows Live Mail Login Password Issue

  • Make sure you’re typing the right email id and password combination. once we have different online accounts, it’s common to exchange passwords. If you discover it difficult to recollect the password, use a password manager app. With such apps you would like to recollect just one password, that’s the password of the app itself.
  • If you’re 100% sure that your password is correct, check the Caps Lock. Passwords are case-sensitive so use the Caps Lock accordingly.
  • Clear your browser’s cache and shut it. Open it again and check out to check-in.
  • Try signing in from a special browser.
  • Try these tips to ascertain which one works for you. If you can’t access your account through the following pointers, Microsoft offers a password reset option for the Windows Live Mail account.

Windows Live Mail Password Reset

Follow the steps to reset your password:

  • Go to the official login page (You must be there already.)

  • Enter your email id. Click ‘Next.’

  • On the screen that follows, find the ‘Forgot my password’ link below the ‘Sign in’ button. Click it.

  • You will be redirected to the ‘Change Windows Live Mail Password’ page.

  • forgot my password windows live mail

  • Select from the explanations why you can’t check-in. Click ‘Next.’

  • Enter the e-mail address you used for check-in. this might be an email with Microsoft domain (hotmail.com or outlook.com) or the other like gmail.com or yahoo.com.

  • Enter the characters you see within the CAPTCHA. This identifies that you simply aren’t a robot and it’s not an effort to hack your account. Click ‘Next.’

  • If you’ve got entered the safety (recovery) details at the time of check-in, you’ll receive a security code on your telephone number or alternate email id.

  • Enter the safety within the field provided and click on ‘Next.’

  • You can now set a replacement password for your account and regain access.
    OR

  • If you haven’t provided any security option or can’t access it, click on the ‘I can’t access this verification option’ link.

  • You will be redirected to a page where you’ll enter the other alternate email address which you’ll access. Enter it and click on ‘Next.’

  • Enter the safety code you received and click on ‘Next.’

  • You can now reset your password and check in to your account with this new password.

If you’ve got any issues with the reset process, contact Windows Live Mail Support and the repair team for help.

#windows live email login problems #windows live email login issues #windows live mail login issues #windows live mail login problems

Alex  Sam

Alex Sam

1593782362

Top Chat Software for Live Streaming & Broadcasting Web & Mobile Apps

Do you Increase your Website Engagment?

I analysed, ranked and reviewed best live video streaming chat APIs and SDKs for your web & mobile app based on client reviews and ratings. portfolio, usecases, cost, secure streaming, live chat features, cost, support, etc.

Turn your viewers into participatients with Live Streaming Chat Solutions. There are lot of Real-time chat apis & SDks Providers have in online market now. You can easily integrte and customize real time chat solutions into your new or existing live video streaming web and iOS & android applications. Below have mentioned best real time chat api & SDk Proivders.

Live video streaming chat api
Live video streaming chat apis

Here are The Most Popular Live Video Streaming Chat APIs & SDKs to be Considered for your Mobile App

1. CONTUS Fly - Real-time Messaging Platform for Live Streaming Apps & Webs

CONTUS Fly is one of the leading real time messaging software providers in the market for a decade. Their messaging platforms are completely customizable since they provide Chat APIs and SDKs to integrate real time chat feasibility on your live streaming applications irrespective of audience base. Engage your audience like a live concert, stadium like experience through digitally. Create channels for every live streaming event, sports or anything that would create buzz. Enable audience to interact with each other over voice, video chats and real-time text chats with engaging emojis. CONTUS Fly enables users to add emojis and stickers to captivate each audience and create fun.

Highlight Features of CONTUS Fly Live Video Streaming Platform Includes:

  1. Chat for Live Video Streaming
  2. Video & Audio Recording
  3. Video Calling
  4. Drawing whitebord
  5. Screen Sharing
  6. End to End Encryption

2. Apphitect -Instant chat for Live Streaming Platforms

To make every live streaming and broadcasting videos more engaging and entertaining, Apphitect’s instant messaging comes with exciting Instant messaging chat APIs to add chat into streaming applications. Apphitect is built with multiple real time communication features like video chat, voice chat and real-time chat to your streaming apps. Their solution surprisingly has a wide range of features to communicate, engage and increase subscription benefits.

Highlight Features of Apphitect Live Insterative Broadcasting Software Includes:

  1. Live Video Streaming Chat
  2. Cross Platform Support
  3. Audio & Video Recording
  4. Live Video Calling
  5. Emoji & Stickers

3. MirrorFly - Enterprise Real Time Chat for Streaming Websites

One of the enterprise-grade real-time chat solutions built to create virtual chat experience for live streaming events and websites for big brands and startups. Irrespective of audience base, category, MirrorFly provides customizable real time chat APIs to add virtual communication mediums on live streaming and broadcasting applications. Their solution comes with absolute moderation tools and open channels to talk and listen with your audience. MirrorFly’s server infrastructure has the potential to handle concurrent messages and users and to achieve maximum sales conversion.

Highlight Features of MirrorFly Live Streaming Chat API Includes:

  1. Face to Face Video Calling
  2. Live Interactive Broadcasting
  3. Call Recording
  4. Digital Whiteboard
  5. Group Video Calling

4. Applozic - Real-time Chat Plugin for Live Broadcasting & Video Streaming apps

When it comes to building a live streaming chat app software that covers the entire platforms and demand All-in-One package (features, Customization to any extent) with a one-time payment for lifetime performance, then undoubtedly Contus Fly makes the right choice to partner with. The company offers live broadcasting SDK for Android/iOS and chat APIs for customization.

Highlight Features of Applozic Chat Live Streaming Platform Includes:

  1. Real time Communication
  2. Cross Platform Support
  3. Live Audio Broadcasting
  4. Push Notifications
  5. Secure Image Sharing

5. Sendbird - Top Real time Chat for Live Video Streams

Being a leading real time chat platform provider in the market, Sendbird has its own hallmark of communication features to the world’s most prominent live streaming applications. Their real time chat solution enables broadcasting and streaming platform’ owners to create a physical equivalent digital chat experience for the audience during any live event streaming to interact, collaborate and cheer together within the same streaming screen. By creating open channels and groups, you can enable the audience to interact with each other during any streaming, engage them with polls, stickers, multiple communication channels and more.

Highlight Features of Sendbird Live Streaming Chat API Includes:

  1. Chat for Streaming website
  2. Messaging Data
  3. Multi Platforms
  4. Push Notifications
  5. End to End Encryption

6. Agora - Interactive Live Chat for Live Video Streaming

Agora, a deep integratable API available in the market to deliver live interactive streaming experience for workplace, enterprises, gaming, retail, telehealth and social live streaming websites. With easy-to-embed SDKs, Agora empowers businesses to add HD and low latency video and voice chat features into any streaming platforms and channels. Their easy-to-embed real time chat features encourage higher levels of user engagement and opportunity to drive more audience.

7. Enablex - A Redefined Communication APIs for In-app Chat

Their smart and secure chat APIs deliver real-time chat feasibility for live and on-demand video streaming websites. The real time chat features provides users to communicate and engage within the same streaming platform irrespective of interaction medium and audience count. Enablex offers platform-as-a-service communication solutions for real time messaging integration with APIs hosting possibility on public, private and cloud deployment. Their APIs are enriched with multiple communication features and engagement tools like live-polls, stickers and more.

8. Pubnub - In-app Chat Platforms for Live Event Streaming Websites

In order to increase user engagement with live and remote audiences, Pubnub offers real time messaging chat functionality with interactive features to drive event-based engagement with mass chat. Their in-app chat feature enhances live programs, event streaming and blogging content with live polling, multiple chats and more. It also enables live streaming websites to build community, channels and super groups during live streaming to bring the entire audience base to one place.

9. Vonage - Communication APIs for In-app Messagings

Vonage is a prime provider of communication APIs for major industrial sectors and enterprise workplaces. With its API, businesses such as live streaming applications can integrate in-app messaging features into any streaming platforms on Android, iOS and Web to empower user engagement. Their APIs are powered with scalable infrastructure and provide multiple communication mediums such as in-app voice, video and chat proactively engaging the audience.

10. Firekast - Live Chat Widget for Video Streaming Player

Firekast provides a customizable live chat widget with HTML code for streaming players to enable chat within any streaming or on-demand videos. The chat widget gives the ability for brands and content owners to make the audience to interact with each other for better engagement and proactivity during streaming. The Firekast Live chat comes with moderator tools that will allow administrators to delete or ban abusive content and users from the channel or groups. Firekast’s live chat comes with a private chat widget to create public or private chat rooms to make effective collaboration and discussions.
 

Conclusion
And this is all the real time chat providers in the market to implement chat functionality in any live streaming or broadcasting platforms. More than delivering entertaining live content, creating a massive engagement and buzz for every live event is the smarter way to turn every audience into a protiable subscriber. Picking up the right software provider is more important than just handling the integration process.

#live #live-streaming-solutions #live-streaming-chat-api #live-streaming-chat-sdk #chat-api-for-live-broadcasting

Annalise  Hyatt

Annalise Hyatt

1593850920

2 Simple Steps to Set up Passwordless SSH Login on Ubuntu

This tutorial explains how to set up passwordless SSH login on an Ubuntu desktop. There’re basically two ways of authenticating user login with OpenSSH server: password authentication and public key-based authentication. The latter is also known as passwordless SSH login because you don’t have to enter your password.

2 Simple Steps to Set Up Passwordless SSH Login

Step 1: Generate a Public/Private Keypair on Your Ubuntu Desktop

On your Ubuntu desktop (not your server), enter the following command in a terminal window.

ssh-keygen -t rsa

-t stands for type. The above command generates a RSA type keypair. RSA is the default type, so you can also type ssh-keygen in terminal. By default the key is 2048 bits long, if you prefer stronger security then you can specify a 4096 bits key like below.

ssh-keygen -t rsa -b 4096

When asked which file to save the key, you can simply press Enter to select the default file. Next, enter a good passphrase that is at least 20 characters long. The passphrase is used to encrypt the private key. The private key (your identification) will be save in** .ssh/id_rsa** under your home directory. The public key will be save in the .ssh/id_rsa.pub file.

passwordless ssh login

From the randomart image we can see the length of the key (RSA 4096). And if you take a look at the ~/.ssh/id_rsa file with

head ~/.ssh/id_rsa

You can see that the private key is encrypted, as indicated by the first two lines of the private key file.

-----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----
Proc-Type: 4,ENCRYPTED

Step 2: Upload Your Public Key to Remote Linux Server

This can be easily done with ssh-copy-id command, which is shipped by the openssh-client package.

ssh-copy-id remote-user@server-ip

Enter the remote user’s password. Sample output:

/usr/bin/ssh-copy-id: INFO: attempting to log in with the new key(s), to filter out any that are already installed
/usr/bin/ssh-copy-id: INFO: 1 key(s) remain to be installed -- if you are prompted now it is to install the new keys
remote-user@server-ip's password:
Number of key(s) added: 1
Now try logging into the machine, with: "ssh 'remote-user@server-ip'"
and check to make sure that only the key(s) you wanted were added.

The public key is stored in .ssh/authorized_keys file under the remote user’s home directory. Now ssh into the remote server

ssh remote-user@server-ip

This time you need to enter your RSA** key** passphrase to unlock the private key. You can also select automatic unlocking the key when logging in so you don’t have to enter passphrase anymore.

#linux server #openssh #public key authentication #security #ssh key #ssh passwordless login #ubuntu