Paula  Hall

Paula Hall

1640422458

How to Query Pandas DataFrame with SQL

In this article we will examine how to perform data manipulation of Pandas Dataframe using SQL with pandasqllibrary. Learn:

  1. What is Pandasql?
  2. How Does Pandasql Work?
  3. Examples
  4. Limitations of Pandasql

#pandas #python #sql #dataframe 

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How to Query Pandas DataFrame with SQL
Cayla  Erdman

Cayla Erdman

1594369800

Introduction to Structured Query Language SQL pdf

SQL stands for Structured Query Language. SQL is a scripting language expected to store, control, and inquiry information put away in social databases. The main manifestation of SQL showed up in 1974, when a gathering in IBM built up the principal model of a social database. The primary business social database was discharged by Relational Software later turning out to be Oracle.

Models for SQL exist. In any case, the SQL that can be utilized on every last one of the major RDBMS today is in various flavors. This is because of two reasons:

1. The SQL order standard is genuinely intricate, and it isn’t handy to actualize the whole standard.

2. Every database seller needs an approach to separate its item from others.

Right now, contrasts are noted where fitting.

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Kasey  Turcotte

Kasey Turcotte

1623927960

Pandas DataFrame vs. Spark DataFrame: When Parallel Computing Matters

With Performance Comparison Analysis and Guided Example of Animated 3D Wireframe Plot

Python is famous for its vast selection of libraries and resources from the open-source community. As a Data Analyst/Engineer/Scientist, one might be familiar with popular packages such as NumpyPandasScikit-learnKeras, and TensorFlow. Together these modules help us extract value out of data and propels the field of analytics. As data continue to become larger and more complex, one other element to consider is a framework dedicated to processing Big Data, such as Apache Spark. In this article, I will demonstrate the capabilities of distributed/cluster computing and present a comparison between the Pandas DataFrame and Spark DataFrame. My hope is to provide more conviction on choosing the right implementation.

Pandas DataFrame

Pandas has become very popular for its ease of use. It utilizes DataFrames to present data in tabular format like a spreadsheet with rows and columns. Importantly, it has very intuitive methods to perform common analytical tasks and a relatively flat learning curve. It loads all of the data into memory on a single machine (one node) for rapid execution. While the Pandas DataFrame has proven to be tremendously powerful in manipulating data, it does have its limits. With data growing at an exponentially rate, complex data processing becomes expensive to handle and causes performance degradation. These operations require parallelization and distributed computing, which the Pandas DataFrame does not support.

Introducing Cluster/Distribution Computing and Spark DataFrame

Apache Spark is an open-source cluster computing framework. With cluster computing, data processing is distributed and performed in parallel by multiple nodes. This is recognized as the MapReduce framework because the division of labor can usually be characterized by sets of the mapshuffle, and reduce operations found in functional programming. Spark’s implementation of cluster computing is unique because processes 1) are executed in-memory and 2) build up a query plan which does not execute until necessary (known as lazy execution). Although Spark’s cluster computing framework has a broad range of utility, we only look at the Spark DataFrame for the purpose of this article. Similar to those found in Pandas, the Spark DataFrame has intuitive APIs, making it easy to implement.

#pandas dataframe vs. spark dataframe: when parallel computing matters #pandas #pandas dataframe #pandas dataframe vs. spark dataframe #spark #when parallel computing matters

Introduction to Recursive CTE

This article will introduce the concept of SQL recursive. Recursive CTE is a really cool. We will see that it can often simplify our code, and avoid a cascade of SQL queries!

Why use a recursive CTE ?

The recursive queries are used to query hierarchical data. It avoids a cascade of SQL queries, you can only do one query to retrieve the hierarchical data.

What is recursive CTE ?

First, what is a CTE? A CTE (Common Table Expression) is a temporary named result set that you can reference within a SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE statement. For example, you can use CTE when, in a query, you will use the same subquery more than once.

A recursive CTE is one having a subquery that refers to its own name!

Recursive CTE is defined in the SQL standard.

How to make a recursive CTE?

A recursive CTE has this structure:

  • The WITH clause must begin with “WITH RECURSIVE”
  • The recursive CTE subquery has two parts, separated by “UNION [ALL]” or “UNION DISTINCT”:
  • The first part produces the initial row(s) for the CTE. This SELECT does not refer to the CTE name.
  • The second part recurses by referring to the CTE name in its FROM clause.

Practice / Example

In this example, we use hierarchical data. Each row can have zero or one parent. And it parent can also have a parent etc.

Create table test (id integer, parent_id integer);

insert into test (id, parent_id) values (1, null);

insert into test (id, parent_id) values (11, 1);
insert into test (id, parent_id) values (111, 11);

insert into test (id, parent_id) values (112, 11);

insert into test (id, parent_id) values (12, 1);

insert into test (id, parent_id) values (121, 12);

For example, the row with id 111 has as ancestors: 11 and 1.

Before knowing the recursive CTE, I was doing several queries to get all the ancestors of a row.

For example, to retrieve all the ancestors of the row with id 111.

While (has parent)

	Select id, parent_id from test where id = X

With recursive CTE, we can retrieve all ancestors of a row with only one SQL query :)

WITH RECURSIVE cte_test AS (
	SELECT id, parent_id FROM test WHERE id = 111
	UNION 
	SELECT test.id, test.parent_id FROM test JOIN cte_test ON cte_test.id = test.parent_id

) SELECT * FROM cte_test

Explanations:

  • “WITH RECURSIVE”:

It indicates we will make recursive

  • “SELECT id, parent_id FROM test WHERE id = 111”:

It is the initial query.

  • “UNION … JOIN cte_test” :

It is the recursive expression! We make a jointure with the current CTE!

Replay this example here

#sql #database #sql-server #sql-injection #writing-sql-queries #sql-beginner-tips #better-sql-querying-tips #sql-top-story

Practice Problems: How To Join DataFrames in Pandas

Hey - Nick here! This page is a free excerpt from my $199 course Python for Finance, which is 50% off for the next 50 students.

If you want the full course, click here to sign up.

It’s now time for some practice problems! See below for details on how to proceed.

Course Repository & Practice Problems

All of the code for this course’s practice problems can be found in this GitHub repository.

There are two options that you can use to complete the practice problems:

  • Open them in your browser with a platform called Binder using this link (recommended)
  • Download the repository to your local computer and open them in a Jupyter Notebook using Anaconda (a bit more tedious)

Note that binder can take up to a minute to load the repository, so please be patient.

Within that repository, there is a folder called starter-files and a folder called finished-files. You should open the appropriate practice problems within the starter-files folder and only consult the corresponding file in the finished-files folder if you get stuck.

The repository is public, which means that you can suggest changes using a pull request later in this course if you’d like.

#dataframes #pandas #practice problems: how to join dataframes in pandas #how to join dataframes in pandas #practice #/pandas/issues.

Cayla  Erdman

Cayla Erdman

1596441660

Welcome Back the T-SQL Debugger with SQL Complete – SQL Debugger

When you develop large chunks of T-SQL code with the help of the SQL Server Management Studio tool, it is essential to test the “Live” behavior of your code by making sure that each small piece of code works fine and being able to allocate any error message that may cause a failure within that code.

The easiest way to perform that would be to use the T-SQL debugger feature, which used to be built-in over the SQL Server Management Studio tool. But since the T-SQL debugger feature was removed completely from SQL Server Management Studio 18 and later editions, we need a replacement for that feature. This is because we cannot keep using the old versions of SSMS just to support the T-SQL Debugger feature without “enjoying” the new features and bug fixes that are released in the new SSMS versions.

If you plan to wait for SSMS to bring back the T-SQL Debugger feature, vote in the Put Debugger back into SSMS 18 to ask Microsoft to reintroduce it.

As for me, I searched for an alternative tool for a T-SQL Debugger SSMS built-in feature and found that Devart company rolled out a new T-SQL Debugger feature to version 6.4 of SQL – Complete tool. SQL Complete is an add-in for Visual Studio and SSMS that offers scripts autocompletion capabilities, which help develop and debug your SQL database project.

The SQL Debugger feature of SQL Complete allows you to check the execution of your scripts, procedures, functions, and triggers step by step by adding breakpoints to the lines where you plan to start, suspend, evaluate, step through, and then to continue the execution of your script.

You can download SQL Complete from the dbForge Download page and install it on your machine using a straight-forward installation wizard. The wizard will ask you to specify the installation path for the SQL Complete tool and the versions of SSMS and Visual Studio that you plan to install the SQL Complete on, as an add-in, from the versions that are installed on your machine, as shown below:

Once SQL Complete is fully installed on your machine, the dbForge SQL Complete installation wizard will notify you of whether the installation was completed successfully or the wizard faced any specific issue that you can troubleshoot and fix easily. If there are no issues, the wizard will provide you with an option to open the SSMS tool and start using the SQL Complete tool, as displayed below:

When you open SSMS, you will see a new “Debug” tools menu, under which you can navigate the SQL Debugger feature options. Besides, you will see a list of icons that will be used to control the debug mode of the T-SQL query at the leftmost side of the SSMS tool. If you cannot see the list, you can go to View -> Toolbars -> Debugger to make these icons visible.

During the debugging session, the SQL Debugger icons will be as follows:

The functionality of these icons within the SQL Debugger can be summarized as:

  • Adding Breakpoints to control the execution pause of the T-SQL script at a specific statement allows you to check the debugging information of the T-SQL statements such as the values for the parameters and the variables.
  • Step Into is “navigate” through the script statements one by one, allowing you to check how each statement behaves.
  • Step Over is “execute” a specific stored procedure if you are sure that it contains no error.
  • Step Out is “return” from the stored procedure, function, or trigger to the main debugging window.
  • Continue executing the script until reaching the next breakpoint.
  • Stop Debugging is “terminate” the debugging session.
  • Restart “stop and start” the current debugging session.

#sql server #sql #sql debugger #sql server #sql server stored procedure #ssms #t-sql queries