Ruth  Nabimanya

Ruth Nabimanya

1621327800

Graphs and Knowledge Connexions. The Year of the Graph Newsletter, Autumn 2020

As 2020 is coming to an end, let’s see it off in style. Our journey in the world of Graph Analytics, Graph Databases, Knowledge Graphs and Graph AI culminate.

The representation of the relationships among data, information, knowledge and --ultimately-- wisdom, known as the data pyramid, has long been part of the language of information science. Digital transformation has made this relevant beyond the confines of information science. COVID-19 has brought years’ worth of digital transformation in just a few short months.

In this new knowledge-based digital world, encoding and making use of business and operational knowledge is the key to making progress and staying competitive. So how do we go from data to information, and from information to knowledge? This is the key question Knowledge Connexions aims to address.

Graphs in all shapes and forms are a key part of this.


Knowledge Connexions is a visionary event featuring a rich array of technological building blocks to support the transition to a knowledge-based economy: Connecting data, people and ideas, building a global knowledge ecosystem.

The Year of the Graph will be there, in the workshop “From databases to platforms: the evolution of Graph databases”. George Anadiotis, Alan Morrison, Steve Sarsfield, Juan Sequeda and Steven Xi bring many years of expertise in the domain, and will analyze Graph Databases from all possible angles.

This is the first step in the relaunch of the Year of the Graph Database Report. Year of the Graph Newsletter subscribers just got a 25% discount code. To be always in the know, subscribe to the newsletter, and follow the newly launched Year of the Graph account on Twitter! In addition to getting the famous YotG news stream every day, you will also get a 25% discount code.

#database #machine learning #artificial intelligence #data science #graph databases #graph algorithms #graph analytics #emerging technologies #knowledge graphs #semantic technologies

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Graphs and Knowledge Connexions. The Year of the Graph Newsletter, Autumn 2020
Ruth  Nabimanya

Ruth Nabimanya

1621327800

Graphs and Knowledge Connexions. The Year of the Graph Newsletter, Autumn 2020

As 2020 is coming to an end, let’s see it off in style. Our journey in the world of Graph Analytics, Graph Databases, Knowledge Graphs and Graph AI culminate.

The representation of the relationships among data, information, knowledge and --ultimately-- wisdom, known as the data pyramid, has long been part of the language of information science. Digital transformation has made this relevant beyond the confines of information science. COVID-19 has brought years’ worth of digital transformation in just a few short months.

In this new knowledge-based digital world, encoding and making use of business and operational knowledge is the key to making progress and staying competitive. So how do we go from data to information, and from information to knowledge? This is the key question Knowledge Connexions aims to address.

Graphs in all shapes and forms are a key part of this.


Knowledge Connexions is a visionary event featuring a rich array of technological building blocks to support the transition to a knowledge-based economy: Connecting data, people and ideas, building a global knowledge ecosystem.

The Year of the Graph will be there, in the workshop “From databases to platforms: the evolution of Graph databases”. George Anadiotis, Alan Morrison, Steve Sarsfield, Juan Sequeda and Steven Xi bring many years of expertise in the domain, and will analyze Graph Databases from all possible angles.

This is the first step in the relaunch of the Year of the Graph Database Report. Year of the Graph Newsletter subscribers just got a 25% discount code. To be always in the know, subscribe to the newsletter, and follow the newly launched Year of the Graph account on Twitter! In addition to getting the famous YotG news stream every day, you will also get a 25% discount code.

#database #machine learning #artificial intelligence #data science #graph databases #graph algorithms #graph analytics #emerging technologies #knowledge graphs #semantic technologies

Brain  Crist

Brain Crist

1594753020

Citrix Bugs Allow Unauthenticated Code Injection, Data Theft

Multiple vulnerabilities in the Citrix Application Delivery Controller (ADC) and Gateway would allow code injection, information disclosure and denial of service, the networking vendor announced Tuesday. Four of the bugs are exploitable by an unauthenticated, remote attacker.

The Citrix products (formerly known as NetScaler ADC and Gateway) are used for application-aware traffic management and secure remote access, respectively, and are installed in at least 80,000 companies in 158 countries, according to a December assessment from Positive Technologies.

Other flaws announced Tuesday also affect Citrix SD-WAN WANOP appliances, models 4000-WO, 4100-WO, 5000-WO and 5100-WO.

Attacks on the management interface of the products could result in system compromise by an unauthenticated user on the management network; or system compromise through cross-site scripting (XSS). Attackers could also create a download link for the device which, if downloaded and then executed by an unauthenticated user on the management network, could result in the compromise of a local computer.

“Customers who have configured their systems in accordance with Citrix recommendations [i.e., to have this interface separated from the network and protected by a firewall] have significantly reduced their risk from attacks to the management interface,” according to the vendor.

Threat actors could also mount attacks on Virtual IPs (VIPs). VIPs, among other things, are used to provide users with a unique IP address for communicating with network resources for applications that do not allow multiple connections or users from the same IP address.

The VIP attacks include denial of service against either the Gateway or Authentication virtual servers by an unauthenticated user; or remote port scanning of the internal network by an authenticated Citrix Gateway user.

“Attackers can only discern whether a TLS connection is possible with the port and cannot communicate further with the end devices,” according to the critical Citrix advisory. “Customers who have not enabled either the Gateway or Authentication virtual servers are not at risk from attacks that are applicable to those servers. Other virtual servers e.g. load balancing and content switching virtual servers are not affected by these issues.”

A final vulnerability has been found in Citrix Gateway Plug-in for Linux that would allow a local logged-on user of a Linux system with that plug-in installed to elevate their privileges to an administrator account on that computer, the company said.

#vulnerabilities #adc #citrix #code injection #critical advisory #cve-2020-8187 #cve-2020-8190 #cve-2020-8191 #cve-2020-8193 #cve-2020-8194 #cve-2020-8195 #cve-2020-8196 #cve-2020-8197 #cve-2020-8198 #cve-2020-8199 #denial of service #gateway #information disclosure #patches #security advisory #security bugs

Luna  Mosciski

Luna Mosciski

1595924640

Graph Therapy: The Year of the Graph Newsletter, June/May 2020

Parts of the world are still in lockdown, while others are returning to some semblance of normalcy. Either way, while the last few months have given some things pause, they have boosted others. It seems like developments in the world of Graphs are among those that have been boosted.

An abundance of educational material on all things graph has been prepared and delivered online, and is now freely accessible, with more on the way.

Graph databases have been making progress and announcements, repositioning themselves by a combination of releasing new features, securing additional funds, and entering strategic partnerships.

A key graph database technology, RDF*, which enables compatibility between RDF and property graph databases, is gaining momentum and tool support.

And more cutting edge research combining graph AI and knowledge graphs is seeing the light, too. Buckle up and enjoy some graph therapy.


Stanford’s series of online seminars featured some of the world’s leading experts on all things graph. If you missed it, or if you’d like to have an overview of what was said, you can find summaries for each lecture in this series of posts by Bob Kasenchak and Ahren Lehnert. Videos from the lectures are available here.

Stanford Knowledge Graph Course Not-Quite-Live-Blog

Stanford University’s computer science department is offering a free class on Knowledge Graphs available to the public. Stanford is also making recordings of the class available via the class website.


Another opportunity to get up to speed with educational material: The entire program of the course “Information Service Engineering” at KIT - Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, is delivered online and made freely available on YouTube. It includes topics such as ontology design, knowledge graph programming, basic graph theory, and more.

Information Service Engineering at KIT

Knowledge representation as a prerequisite for knowledge graphs. Learn about knowledge representation, ontologies, RDF(S), OWL, SPARQL, etc.


Ontology may sound like a formal term, while knowledge graph is a more approachable one. But the 2 are related, and so is ontology and AI. Without a consistent, thoughtful approach to developing, applying, evolving an ontology, AI systems lack underpinning that would allow them to be smart enough to make an impact.

The ontology is an investment that will continue to pay off, argue Seth Earley and Josh Bernoff in Harvard Business Review, making the case for how businesses may benefit from a knowldge-centric approach

Is Your Data Infrastructure Ready for AI?

Even after multiple generations of investments and billions of dollars of digital transformations, organizations struggle to use data to improve customer service, reduce costs, and speed the core processes that provide competitive advantage. AI was supposed to help with that.


Besides AI, knowledge graphs have a part to play in the Cloud, too. State is good, and lack of support for Stateful Cloud-native applications is a roadblock for many enterprise use-cases, writes Dave Duggal.

Graph knowledge bases are an old idea now being revisited to model complex, distributed domains. Combining high-level abstraction with Cloud-native design principles offers efficient “Context-as-a-Service” for hydrating stateless services. Graph knowledge-based systems can enable composition of Cloud-native services into event-driven dataflow processes.

Kubernetes also touches upon Organizational Knowledge, and that may be modeled as a Knowledge Graph.

Graph Knowledge Base for Stateful Cloud-Native Applications

Extending graph knowledge bases to model distributed systems creates a new kind of information system, one intentionally designed for today’s IT challenges.


The Enterprise Knowledge Graph Foundation was recently established to define best practices and mature the marketplace for EKG adoption, with a launch webinar on June the 23rd.

The Foundation defines its mission as including adopting semantic standards, developing best practices for accelerated EKG deployment, curating a repository of reusable models and resources, building a mechanism for engagement and shared knowledge, and advancing the business cases for EKG adoption.

Enterprise Knowledge Graph Maturity Model

The Enterprise Knowledge Graph Maturity Model (EKG/MM) is the industry-standard definition of the capabilities required for an enterprise knowledge graph. It establishes standard criteria for measuring progress and sets out the practical questions that all involved stakeholders ask to ensure trust, confidence and usage flexibility of data. Each capability area provides a business summary denoting its importance, a definition of the added value from semantic standards and scoring criteria based on five levels of defined maturity.


Enterprise Knowledge Graphs is what the Semantic Web Company (SWC) and Ontotext have been about for a long time, too. Two of the vendors in this space that have been around for the longer time just announced a strategic partnership: Ontotext, a graph database and platform provider, meets SWC, a management and added value layer that sits on top.

SWC and Ontotext CEOs emphasize how their portfolios are complementary, while the press release states that the companies have implemented a seamless integration of the PoolParty Semantic Suite™ v.8 with the GraphDB™ and Ontotext Platform, which offers benefits for many use cases.

#database #artificial intelligence #graph databases #rdf #graph analytics #knowledge graph #graph technology

Luna  Mosciski

Luna Mosciski

1595932020

Graph Therapy: The Year of the Graph Newsletter, June/May 2020

Parts of the world are still in lockdown, while others are returning to some semblance of normalcy. Either way, while the last few months have given some things pause, they have boosted others. It seems like developments in the world of Graphs are among those that have been boosted.

An abundance of educational material on all things graph has been prepared and delivered online, and is now freely accessible, with more on the way.

Graph databases have been making progress and announcements, repositioning themselves by a combination of releasing new features, securing additional funds, and entering strategic partnerships.

A key graph database technology, RDF*, which enables compatibility between RDF and property graph databases, is gaining momentum and tool support.

And more cutting edge research combining graph AI and knowledge graphs is seeing the light, too. Buckle up and enjoy some graph therapy.


Stanford’s series of online seminars featured some of the world’s leading experts on all things graph. If you missed it, or if you’d like to have an overview of what was said, you can find summaries for each lecture in this series of posts by Bob Kasenchak and Ahren Lehnert. Videos from the lectures are available here.

Stanford Knowledge Graph Course Not-Quite-Live-Blog

Stanford University’s computer science department is offering a free class on Knowledge Graphs available to the public. Stanford is also making recordings of the class available via the class website.


Another opportunity to get up to speed with educational material: The entire program of the course “Information Service Engineering” at KIT - Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, is delivered online and made freely available on YouTube. It includes topics such as ontology design, knowledge graph programming, basic graph theory, and more.

Information Service Engineering at KIT

Knowledge representation as a prerequisite for knowledge graphs. Learn about knowledge representation, ontologies, RDF(S), OWL, SPARQL, etc.


Ontology may sound like a formal term, while knowledge graph is a more approachable one. But the 2 are related, and so is ontology and AI. Without a consistent, thoughtful approach to developing, applying, evolving an ontology, AI systems lack underpinning that would allow them to be smart enough to make an impact.

The ontology is an investment that will continue to pay off, argue Seth Earley and Josh Bernoff in Harvard Business Review, making the case for how businesses may benefit from a knowldge-centric approach

Is Your Data Infrastructure Ready for AI?

Even after multiple generations of investments and billions of dollars of digital transformations, organizations struggle to use data to improve customer service, reduce costs, and speed the core processes that provide competitive advantage. AI was supposed to help with that.


Besides AI, knowledge graphs have a part to play in the Cloud, too. State is good, and lack of support for Stateful Cloud-native applications is a roadblock for many enterprise use-cases, writes Dave Duggal.

Graph knowledge bases are an old idea now being revisited to model complex, distributed domains. Combining high-level abstraction with Cloud-native design principles offers efficient “Context-as-a-Service” for hydrating stateless services. Graph knowledge-based systems can enable composition of Cloud-native services into event-driven dataflow processes.

Kubernetes also touches upon Organizational Knowledge, and that may be modeled as a Knowledge Graph.

Graph Knowledge Base for Stateful Cloud-Native Applications

Extending graph knowledge bases to model distributed systems creates a new kind of information system, one intentionally designed for today’s IT challenges.


The Enterprise Knowledge Graph Foundation was recently established to define best practices and mature the marketplace for EKG adoption, with a launch webinar on June the 23rd.

The Foundation defines its mission as including adopting semantic standards, developing best practices for accelerated EKG deployment, curating a repository of reusable models and resources, building a mechanism for engagement and shared knowledge, and advancing the business cases for EKG adoption.

Enterprise Knowledge Graph Maturity Model

The Enterprise Knowledge Graph Maturity Model (EKG/MM) is the industry-standard definition of the capabilities required for an enterprise knowledge graph. It establishes standard criteria for measuring progress and sets out the practical questions that all involved stakeholders ask to ensure trust, confidence and usage flexibility of data. Each capability area provides a business summary denoting its importance, a definition of the added value from semantic standards and scoring criteria based on five levels of defined maturity.


Enterprise Knowledge Graphs is what the Semantic Web Company (SWC) and Ontotext have been about for a long time, too. Two of the vendors in this space that have been around for the longer time just announced a strategic partnership: Ontotext, a graph database and platform provider, meets SWC, a management and added value layer that sits on top.

SWC and Ontotext CEOs emphasize how their portfolios are complementary, while the press release states that the companies have implemented a seamless integration of the PoolParty Semantic Suite™ v.8 with the GraphDB™ and Ontotext Platform, which offers benefits for many use cases.

#database #artificial intelligence #graph databases #rdf #graph analytics #knowledge graph #graph technology

Arno  Bradtke

Arno Bradtke

1600262040

Towards a Knowledge Graph Economy. The Year of the Graph Newsletter, Summer 2020

Knowledge graphs have become an iconic technology trend for a reason. Knowledge graphs exemplify the emphasis on knowledge, and connections.

These past few months have not been kind to any of us. The ripples caused by the COVID-19 pandemic are felt far and wide, and the world’s economies have taken a staggering blow.

Is there hope? And what’s that got to do with graphs, you might ask. Knowledge graphs have become an iconic technology trend for a reason. Knowledge graphs exemplify the emphasis on knowledge, and connections.

In the current state of the economy, knowledge-based and remotely delivered activities have an advantage over service-based ones requiring real-world interaction. Whether this is necessarily a good thing is another issue entirely.

In any case, we have to note the fact that knowledge graphs seem a natural fit for the unofficial title of the foundation on which a next-day economy can be built.


That’s the thinking behind Connected Data London’s Meetup on September the 23rd. Steering towards a knowledge-based economy - how knowledge graphs can catalyze digital transformation and AI in the enterprise and beyond.

A UBS Information Architect will talk about a data revolution - the emergence of the decentralized Enterprise Knowledge Graph to vastly increase data connectivity.

The CEO of Franz Inc will outline the future of AI in the Enterprise is tied to Entity-Event Knowledge Graphs for Data-Centric organizations.

A Knowledge Engineer from Engine B will show how Knowledge Graphs can be used for Data integrity, innovation and digitalization in professional services.

#machine learning #artificial intelligence #analytics #graph databases #graph algorithms #knowledge graphs