Armando  Bruen

Armando Bruen

1596127020

Quick Wins with Code: Promises in JavaScript

Programmers often wait for their code to return something. Perhaps it’s JSON from a REST endpoint you hit from the client. Perhaps it’s a record from a database you queried from the server.

Perhaps it’s the human, coming home with treats.

Thankfully, we can do other stuff while we wait! A program can continue executing other code while requests for external resources continue to sit patiently in the background, stepping out of the way so that other code can continue to run. When the code that was waiting on something finally receives that thing, it can then follow up by doing something that it was holding off on doing until it first got what it needed.

To keep up the dog analogy a little longer — this behavior equates to the idea of a dog waiting for its owner to get home before it is let out to do its “business”. However, while the dog is waiting, it chews up a pillow, runs around the house eight times, and barks for twenty minutes. Those actions weren’t dependent on the human returning, so they just happen. Thankfully, the dog at least knows to hold it in the meantime.

This idea of non-blocking code execution is called asynchronous programming.

In JavaScript, we can handle asynchronous code with something called callback functions (see MDN’s doc on callbacks). Callback functions are great, but they’re not always the tool I want to reach for. There’s another tool. For the types of calls where we are waiting on a resource from an external source, I prefer to use the Promise object**.**

What is a promise?

MDN’s page on the Promise object nails the definition, so I will defer to them:

The Promise object represents the eventual completion (or failure) of an asynchronous operation, and its resulting value.

Promise is a JavaScript object that helps us handle the timing of asynchronous operations. We can wrap the code we want to run asynchronously in a Promise, which will help us detect when that operation has successfully (or unsuccessfully) completed. We can then trigger follow up code that depended first on a promise fulfillment, or that handles a promise rejection.

Since I started learning JavaScript, I have worked with two prevailing implementations for utilizing promises. They are promise chaining with .then(), and async await.

#web-dev-bootcamps #fetch-api #promises #asyncawait #javascript #programming

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Quick Wins with Code: Promises in JavaScript

A Beginner’s Guide To Promises In JavaScript

Welcome to my post about the JavaScript Promises. I hope it can be helpful since when we start programming it is difficult to enter the context.

Promises are one of the largest tools in the world of JavaScript that helps us to manage future situations in the flow of execution of a program.

The promises originated in the realm of functional programming, generally to handle asynchronous programming. In short, they allow us to define how data that will only be available in the future will be treated, specifying what will be done with that data later.

The promises were introduced in the standard in ES6, the truth is that they have been used for a long time since several libraries had implemented them to solve their needs in a more elegant way.

Image for post

The Promise object represents the eventual completion or failure of an asynchronous operation and its resulting value.

#programming #coding #javascript-promise #promises #javascript

Rahul Jangid

1622207074

What is JavaScript - Stackfindover - Blog

Who invented JavaScript, how it works, as we have given information about Programming language in our previous article ( What is PHP ), but today we will talk about what is JavaScript, why JavaScript is used The Answers to all such questions and much other information about JavaScript, you are going to get here today. Hope this information will work for you.

Who invented JavaScript?

JavaScript language was invented by Brendan Eich in 1995. JavaScript is inspired by Java Programming Language. The first name of JavaScript was Mocha which was named by Marc Andreessen, Marc Andreessen is the founder of Netscape and in the same year Mocha was renamed LiveScript, and later in December 1995, it was renamed JavaScript which is still in trend.

What is JavaScript?

JavaScript is a client-side scripting language used with HTML (Hypertext Markup Language). JavaScript is an Interpreted / Oriented language called JS in programming language JavaScript code can be run on any normal web browser. To run the code of JavaScript, we have to enable JavaScript of Web Browser. But some web browsers already have JavaScript enabled.

Today almost all websites are using it as web technology, mind is that there is maximum scope in JavaScript in the coming time, so if you want to become a programmer, then you can be very beneficial to learn JavaScript.

JavaScript Hello World Program

In JavaScript, ‘document.write‘ is used to represent a string on a browser.

<script type="text/javascript">
	document.write("Hello World!");
</script>

How to comment JavaScript code?

  • For single line comment in JavaScript we have to use // (double slashes)
  • For multiple line comments we have to use / * – – * /
<script type="text/javascript">

//single line comment

/* document.write("Hello"); */

</script>

Advantages and Disadvantages of JavaScript

#javascript #javascript code #javascript hello world #what is javascript #who invented javascript

Julie  Donnelly

Julie Donnelly

1602406920

JavaScript Promise: Methods Comparison

Introduction

Promises in JavaScript are used to handle asynchronous operations by keeping track of whether a certain event has happened. If that certain event has taken place, it determines what happens next. Promises return a value which is either a resolved value or a reason why it’s rejected. They can handle multiple asynchronous operations easily and they provide better error handling than callbacks and events.

Callback: A callback is a function that is passed into another function as an argument to be executed later.

Events: Events provide a dynamic interface to a WebPage and are connected to elements in the Document Object Model(DOM), for example: onclick(), onmouseover() etc.

A Promise has four states

Pending: Before the event has happened, the promise is in the pending state.

Settled: Once the event has happened it is then in the settled state.

Fulfilled: Action related to the promise has succeeded.

Rejected: Action related to the promise has failed.

#javascript #javascript-development #javascript-tutorial #promises #javascript-tips

Tyrique  Littel

Tyrique Littel

1604008800

Static Code Analysis: What It Is? How to Use It?

Static code analysis refers to the technique of approximating the runtime behavior of a program. In other words, it is the process of predicting the output of a program without actually executing it.

Lately, however, the term “Static Code Analysis” is more commonly used to refer to one of the applications of this technique rather than the technique itself — program comprehension — understanding the program and detecting issues in it (anything from syntax errors to type mismatches, performance hogs likely bugs, security loopholes, etc.). This is the usage we’d be referring to throughout this post.

“The refinement of techniques for the prompt discovery of error serves as well as any other as a hallmark of what we mean by science.”

  • J. Robert Oppenheimer

Outline

We cover a lot of ground in this post. The aim is to build an understanding of static code analysis and to equip you with the basic theory, and the right tools so that you can write analyzers on your own.

We start our journey with laying down the essential parts of the pipeline which a compiler follows to understand what a piece of code does. We learn where to tap points in this pipeline to plug in our analyzers and extract meaningful information. In the latter half, we get our feet wet, and write four such static analyzers, completely from scratch, in Python.

Note that although the ideas here are discussed in light of Python, static code analyzers across all programming languages are carved out along similar lines. We chose Python because of the availability of an easy to use ast module, and wide adoption of the language itself.

How does it all work?

Before a computer can finally “understand” and execute a piece of code, it goes through a series of complicated transformations:

static analysis workflow

As you can see in the diagram (go ahead, zoom it!), the static analyzers feed on the output of these stages. To be able to better understand the static analysis techniques, let’s look at each of these steps in some more detail:

Scanning

The first thing that a compiler does when trying to understand a piece of code is to break it down into smaller chunks, also known as tokens. Tokens are akin to what words are in a language.

A token might consist of either a single character, like (, or literals (like integers, strings, e.g., 7Bob, etc.), or reserved keywords of that language (e.g, def in Python). Characters which do not contribute towards the semantics of a program, like trailing whitespace, comments, etc. are often discarded by the scanner.

Python provides the tokenize module in its standard library to let you play around with tokens:

Python

1

import io

2

import tokenize

3

4

code = b"color = input('Enter your favourite color: ')"

5

6

for token in tokenize.tokenize(io.BytesIO(code).readline):

7

    print(token)

Python

1

TokenInfo(type=62 (ENCODING),  string='utf-8')

2

TokenInfo(type=1  (NAME),      string='color')

3

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string='=')

4

TokenInfo(type=1  (NAME),      string='input')

5

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string='(')

6

TokenInfo(type=3  (STRING),    string="'Enter your favourite color: '")

7

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string=')')

8

TokenInfo(type=4  (NEWLINE),   string='')

9

TokenInfo(type=0  (ENDMARKER), string='')

(Note that for the sake of readability, I’ve omitted a few columns from the result above — metadata like starting index, ending index, a copy of the line on which a token occurs, etc.)

#code quality #code review #static analysis #static code analysis #code analysis #static analysis tools #code review tips #static code analyzer #static code analysis tool #static analyzer

Giles  Goodwin

Giles Goodwin

1603857900

4 Ways You Can Get Rid of Dirty Side Effects for Cleaner Code in JavaScript

According to an analysis, a developer creates 70 bugs per 1000 lines of code on average. As a result, he spends 75% of his time on debugging. So sad!

Bugs are born in many ways. Creating side effects is one of them.

Some people say side effects are evil, some say they’re not.

I’m in the first group. Side effects should be considered evil. And we should aim for side effects free code.

Here are 4ways you can use to achieve the goal.

1. use strict;

Just add use strict; to the beginning of your files. This special string will turn your code validation on and prevent you from using variables without declaring them first.

#functional-programming #javascript-tips #clean-code #coding #javascript-development #javascript