Getting Started with the Document AI Platform

Document AI uses machine learning on a scalable cloud-based platform to help your organization efficiently scan, analyze, and understand documents. In this video, we speak to the capabilities of Document AI and demo how you can integrate this tool into your application or service. Watch to learn how your enterprise can utilize Document AI!

Timestamps:

  • 0:00 - Intro
  • 1:15 - Demo
  • 2:16 - DocAI Pipeline
  • 3:13 - End Using DocAI in your code & Closing → https://goo.gle/3guvrkS

#ai #artificial-intelligence #developer

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Getting Started with the Document AI Platform
Shubham Ankit

Shubham Ankit

1657081614

How to Automate Excel with Python | Python Excel Tutorial (OpenPyXL)

How to Automate Excel with Python

In this article, We will show how we can use python to automate Excel . A useful Python library is Openpyxl which we will learn to do Excel Automation

What is OPENPYXL

Openpyxl is a Python library that is used to read from an Excel file or write to an Excel file. Data scientists use Openpyxl for data analysis, data copying, data mining, drawing charts, styling sheets, adding formulas, and more.

Workbook: A spreadsheet is represented as a workbook in openpyxl. A workbook consists of one or more sheets.

Sheet: A sheet is a single page composed of cells for organizing data.

Cell: The intersection of a row and a column is called a cell. Usually represented by A1, B5, etc.

Row: A row is a horizontal line represented by a number (1,2, etc.).

Column: A column is a vertical line represented by a capital letter (A, B, etc.).

Openpyxl can be installed using the pip command and it is recommended to install it in a virtual environment.

pip install openpyxl

CREATE A NEW WORKBOOK

We start by creating a new spreadsheet, which is called a workbook in Openpyxl. We import the workbook module from Openpyxl and use the function Workbook() which creates a new workbook.

from openpyxl
import Workbook
#creates a new workbook
wb = Workbook()
#Gets the first active worksheet
ws = wb.active
#creating new worksheets by using the create_sheet method

ws1 = wb.create_sheet("sheet1", 0) #inserts at first position
ws2 = wb.create_sheet("sheet2") #inserts at last position
ws3 = wb.create_sheet("sheet3", -1) #inserts at penultimate position

#Renaming the sheet
ws.title = "Example"

#save the workbook
wb.save(filename = "example.xlsx")

READING DATA FROM WORKBOOK

We load the file using the function load_Workbook() which takes the filename as an argument. The file must be saved in the same working directory.

#loading a workbook
wb = openpyxl.load_workbook("example.xlsx")

 

GETTING SHEETS FROM THE LOADED WORKBOOK

 

#getting sheet names
wb.sheetnames
result = ['sheet1', 'Sheet', 'sheet3', 'sheet2']

#getting a particular sheet
sheet1 = wb["sheet2"]

#getting sheet title
sheet1.title
result = 'sheet2'

#Getting the active sheet
sheetactive = wb.active
result = 'sheet1'

 

ACCESSING CELLS AND CELL VALUES

 

#get a cell from the sheet
sheet1["A1"] <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.A1 >

  #get the cell value
ws["A1"].value 'Segment'

#accessing cell using row and column and assigning a value
d = ws.cell(row = 4, column = 2, value = 10)
d.value
10

 

ITERATING THROUGH ROWS AND COLUMNS

 

#looping through each row and column
for x in range(1, 5):
  for y in range(1, 5):
  print(x, y, ws.cell(row = x, column = y)
    .value)

#getting the highest row number
ws.max_row
701

#getting the highest column number
ws.max_column
19

There are two functions for iterating through rows and columns.

Iter_rows() => returns the rows
Iter_cols() => returns the columns {
  min_row = 4, max_row = 5, min_col = 2, max_col = 5
} => This can be used to set the boundaries
for any iteration.

Example:

#iterating rows
for row in ws.iter_rows(min_row = 2, max_col = 3, max_row = 3):
  for cell in row:
  print(cell) <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.A2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.B2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.C2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.A3 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.B3 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.C3 >

  #iterating columns
for col in ws.iter_cols(min_row = 2, max_col = 3, max_row = 3):
  for cell in col:
  print(cell) <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.A2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.A3 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.B2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.B3 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.C2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.C3 >

To get all the rows of the worksheet we use the method worksheet.rows and to get all the columns of the worksheet we use the method worksheet.columns. Similarly, to iterate only through the values we use the method worksheet.values.


Example:

for row in ws.values:
  for value in row:
  print(value)

 

WRITING DATA TO AN EXCEL FILE

Writing to a workbook can be done in many ways such as adding a formula, adding charts, images, updating cell values, inserting rows and columns, etc… We will discuss each of these with an example.

 

CREATING AND SAVING A NEW WORKBOOK

 

#creates a new workbook
wb = openpyxl.Workbook()

#saving the workbook
wb.save("new.xlsx")

 

ADDING AND REMOVING SHEETS

 

#creating a new sheet
ws1 = wb.create_sheet(title = "sheet 2")

#creating a new sheet at index 0
ws2 = wb.create_sheet(index = 0, title = "sheet 0")

#checking the sheet names
wb.sheetnames['sheet 0', 'Sheet', 'sheet 2']

#deleting a sheet
del wb['sheet 0']

#checking sheetnames
wb.sheetnames['Sheet', 'sheet 2']

 

ADDING CELL VALUES

 

#checking the sheet value
ws['B2'].value
null

#adding value to cell
ws['B2'] = 367

#checking value
ws['B2'].value
367

 

ADDING FORMULAS

 

We often require formulas to be included in our Excel datasheet. We can easily add formulas using the Openpyxl module just like you add values to a cell.
 

For example:

import openpyxl
from openpyxl
import Workbook

wb = openpyxl.load_workbook("new1.xlsx")
ws = wb['Sheet']

ws['A9'] = '=SUM(A2:A8)'

wb.save("new2.xlsx")

The above program will add the formula (=SUM(A2:A8)) in cell A9. The result will be as below.

image

 

MERGE/UNMERGE CELLS

Two or more cells can be merged to a rectangular area using the method merge_cells(), and similarly, they can be unmerged using the method unmerge_cells().

For example:
Merge cells

#merge cells B2 to C9
ws.merge_cells('B2:C9')
ws['B2'] = "Merged cells"

Adding the above code to the previous example will merge cells as below.

image

UNMERGE CELLS

 

#unmerge cells B2 to C9
ws.unmerge_cells('B2:C9')

The above code will unmerge cells from B2 to C9.

INSERTING AN IMAGE

To insert an image we import the image function from the module openpyxl.drawing.image. We then load our image and add it to the cell as shown in the below example.

Example:

import openpyxl
from openpyxl
import Workbook
from openpyxl.drawing.image
import Image

wb = openpyxl.load_workbook("new1.xlsx")
ws = wb['Sheet']
#loading the image(should be in same folder)
img = Image('logo.png')
ws['A1'] = "Adding image"
#adjusting size
img.height = 130
img.width = 200
#adding img to cell A3

ws.add_image(img, 'A3')

wb.save("new2.xlsx")

Result:

image

CREATING CHARTS

Charts are essential to show a visualization of data. We can create charts from Excel data using the Openpyxl module chart. Different forms of charts such as line charts, bar charts, 3D line charts, etc., can be created. We need to create a reference that contains the data to be used for the chart, which is nothing but a selection of cells (rows and columns). I am using sample data to create a 3D bar chart in the below example:

Example

import openpyxl
from openpyxl
import Workbook
from openpyxl.chart
import BarChart3D, Reference, series

wb = openpyxl.load_workbook("example.xlsx")
ws = wb.active

values = Reference(ws, min_col = 3, min_row = 2, max_col = 3, max_row = 40)
chart = BarChart3D()
chart.add_data(values)
ws.add_chart(chart, "E3")
wb.save("MyChart.xlsx")

Result
image


How to Automate Excel with Python with Video Tutorial

Welcome to another video! In this video, We will cover how we can use python to automate Excel. I'll be going over everything from creating workbooks to accessing individual cells and stylizing cells. There is a ton of things that you can do with Excel but I'll just be covering the core/base things in OpenPyXl.

⭐️ Timestamps ⭐️
00:00 | Introduction
02:14 | Installing openpyxl
03:19 | Testing Installation
04:25 | Loading an Existing Workbook
06:46 | Accessing Worksheets
07:37 | Accessing Cell Values
08:58 | Saving Workbooks
09:52 | Creating, Listing and Changing Sheets
11:50 | Creating a New Workbook
12:39 | Adding/Appending Rows
14:26 | Accessing Multiple Cells
20:46 | Merging Cells
22:27 | Inserting and Deleting Rows
23:35 | Inserting and Deleting Columns
24:48 | Copying and Moving Cells
26:06 | Practical Example, Formulas & Cell Styling

📄 Resources 📄
OpenPyXL Docs: https://openpyxl.readthedocs.io/en/stable/ 
Code Written in This Tutorial: https://github.com/techwithtim/ExcelPythonTutorial 
Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/TechWithTim/featured 

#python 

Bongani  Ngema

Bongani Ngema

1670346000

How to Create & Add Content - Images, Text To Modern SharePoint Pages

Description

Requirement is to create Modern pages with content, which includes images and text. 

The Content is in SharePoint List. The pages are created from a Page Template.

To get Text part from Page template, use below PowerShell,

#get page textpart instance id
$parts=Get-PnPPageComponent -Page <pagename.aspx>

Execute the below PowerShell to create pages with HTML content from SharePoint List.

$logFile = "Logs\LogFile.log"
Start - Transcript - Path $logFile - Append
#Variables
$libName = "Site Pages"
$siteURL = "https://tenant.sharepoint.com/"
$contentType = "Group and Division Page"
$listname = "Content"
$sectionCategoy = "Our organisation"
#End
Try {
    #Connect to PnP Online
    $connection = Connect - PnPOnline - Url $siteURL - UseWebLogin - ReturnConnection - WarningAction Ignore
    #Get items from Content list
    $items = Get - PnPListItem - List $listName - PageSize 100
    foreach($item in $items) {
        if ($null - ne $item["Title"] - and $null - ne $item["Content"]) {
            #Get Page webparts instance Id
            #$parts = Get - PnPPageComponent - Page PageTemplate.aspx
            # load the page template
            $template = Get - PnPClientSidePage - Identity "Templates/Division-page-template"
            #Get page name
            $fullFileName = $item["Title"].Replace(" ", "_") + ".aspx"
            #Create fileURL
            $fileURL = $siteURL + $libName + "/" + $fullFileName
            # save a new SharePoint Page based on the Page Template
            $template.Save($fullFileName)
            $page = Get - PnPPage - Identity $fullFileName
            $htmlToInject = $item["Content"]
            $htmlToInject = $htmlToInject.TrimStart('{"Html":"').TrimEnd('"}') - replace([regex]::Escape('\n')), '' - replace([regex]::Escape('<a href=\')),' < a href = ' -replace ([regex]:: Escape('\
                        ">')),'" > ' -replace ([regex]::Escape(' & bull; % 09 ')),'
                        ' -replace '
                        https:
                        /*','https://'
            #Set PnP Page Text

            Set-PnPPageTextPart -Page $page -InstanceId "9fab3ce6-0638-4008-a9b9-cf2b784245b5" -Text $htmlToInject


            #publish page
            Set-PnPPage -Identity $fullFileName -Title $item["Title"] -ContentType $contentType -Publish

            #get site pages library
            $sitepagelist= Get-PnPList -Identity 'Site Pages'
            #get page Id and page Item to update section category
            $pageItem=Get-PnPListItem -List $sitepagelist -Id $page.PageId
            Set-PnPListItem -Values @{"SectionCategory" = $sectionCategoy} -List $sitepagelist -Identity $pageItem

        }
        else
        {
            Write-Host "Title or Content has no value"
        }
    }
}
Catch {
    Write-Host "Error: $($_.Exception.Message)" -Foregroundcolor Red
}
Stop-Transcript

Original article source at: https://www.c-sharpcorner.com/

#sharepoint #image #text 

Archie  Powell

Archie Powell

1625958420

Selecting a Conversational AI Platform

Businesses are quickly acknowledging the importance of Conversational AI (CAI) to increase their customer engagement and revenues. The question is no longer whether to deploy CAI, but rather which platform to use and how to leverage its capabilities.

In this series, Daniel Eriksson, Chief Innovation and Customer Success Officer at Artificial Solutions, gives insight on important aspects of a conversational AI platform that buyers often overlook. For example: what does language support really mean? What is localization? How do different deployment models impact the TCO? And maybe most importantly, how can the CAI platform not only help me during the first development sprints, but across the entire bot lifecycle?

Making Bot Developers More Productive

During the last six months, I’ve had a lot of conversations with companies (clients) and system integrators (partners) who have been building conversational bots. I’ve spoken with conversational bot developers, data linguistics reps, integration engineers, conversational designers, project managers, senior stakeholders, product owners, and many more.

At the same time, I’ve talked to existing, new, prospective, and former clients. These talks included people who had ambitious plans and succeeded and others who have had plans where they have struggled to generate impact.

Four Perspectives to Consider When Selecting your Conversational AI Platform

Select a Tool Your Development Team Can Grow With

See past the buzz-words like “awareness”, “understanding”, and “self-learning”.

Conversational AI is a fascinating space and still holds a lot of potential that is yet to be explored. Yet most companies who have experience of CAI tooling will tell you it’s all about engineering, and actually has a lot of resemblance to regular software or process flow development instead of being something ground-breaking new.

Sure, there are some terminologies both useful and specific for the space, like “intent recognition”, “entities”, and “context”. These words are related to the Natural Language Understanding (NLU) part of a conversational bot.

Find a Balance Between Pure Coding and Drag-and-Drop

Have you ever heard about low-code or no-code? In short, those concepts describe a user interface where a developer can configure or graphically design a process instead of having to write programming code. It is a great way to visualize how a program is executed and can be a quick way to build some things rapidly. Here comes the tricky part — for an effective Conversational AI solution with some ambition, you will still need to code. Your team will need to write code in some scripting language. If not, you will not be able to do the things you expect a bot to do. Do not shy away from this fact, as scripting and coding are super important to make a bot great. So, when you look at a toolset, evaluate it from the standpoint “how will the coding part work?”

Consider Possible Future Limitations

There is a lot of CAI tooling in the market today available to developers. Your job is to make sure that you don’t select tooling that is quick to build only the first MVP but also is useful for every new generation of your bot. When your ambitions grow, and your insights on how you can deliver a better bot user experience start to develop, you might realize that the tool you chose is holding you back.

#ai #artificial intelligence #natural language processing #conversational ai #ai platform #platform

Monty  Boehm

Monty Boehm

1659453850

Twitter.jl: Julia Package to Access Twitter API

Twitter.jl

A Julia package for interacting with the Twitter API.

Twitter.jl is a Julia package to work with the Twitter API v1.1. Currently, only the REST API methods are supported; streaming API endpoints aren't implemented at this time.

All functions have required arguments for those parameters required by Twitter and an options keyword argument to provide a Dict{String, String} of optional parameters Twitter API documentation. Most function calls will return either a Dict or an Array <: TwitterType. Bad requests will return the response code from the API (403, 404, etc).

DataFrame methods are defined for functions returning composite types: Tweets, Places, Lists, and Users.

Authentication

Before one can make use of this package, you must create an application on the Twitter's Developer Platform.

Once your application is approved, you can access your dashboard/portal to grab your authentication credentials from the "Details" tab of the application.

Note that you will also want to ensure that your App has Read / Write OAuth access in order to post tweets. You can find out more about this on Stack Overflow.

Installation

To install this package, enter ] on the REPL to bring up Julia's package manager. Then add the package:

julia> ]
(v1.7) pkg> add Twitter

Tip: Press Ctrl+C to return to the julia> prompt.

Usage

To run Twitter.jl, enter the following command in your Julia REPL

julia> using Twitter

Then the a global variable has to be declared with the twitterauth function. This function holds the consumer_key(API Key), consumer_secret(API Key Secret), oauth_token(Access Token), and oauth_secret(Access Token Secret) respectively.

twitterauth("6nOtpXmf...", # API Key
            "sES5Zlj096S...", # API Key Secret
            "98689850-Hj...", # Access Token
            "UroqCVpWKIt...") # Access Token Secret
  • Ensure you put your credentials in an env file to avoid pushing your secrets to the public 🙀.

Note: This package does not currently support OAuth authentication.

Code examples

See runtests.jl for example function calls.

using Twitter, Test
using JSON, OAuth

# set debugging
ENV["JULIA_DEBUG"]=Twitter

twitterauth(ENV["CONSUMER_KEY"], ENV["CONSUMER_SECRET"], ENV["ACCESS_TOKEN"], ENV["ACCESS_TOKEN_SECRET"])

#get_mentions_timeline
mentions_timeline_default = get_mentions_timeline()
tw = mentions_timeline_default[1]
tw_df = DataFrame(mentions_timeline_default)
@test 0 <= length(mentions_timeline_default) <= 20
@test typeof(mentions_timeline_default) == Vector{Tweets}
@test typeof(tw) == Tweets
@test size(tw_df)[2] == 30

#get_user_timeline
user_timeline_default = get_user_timeline(screen_name = "randyzwitch")
@test typeof(user_timeline_default) == Vector{Tweets}

#get_home_timeline
home_timeline_default = get_home_timeline()
@test typeof(home_timeline_default) == Vector{Tweets}

#get_single_tweet_id
get_tweet_by_id = get_single_tweet_id(id = "434685122671939584")
@test typeof(get_tweet_by_id) == Tweets

#get_search_tweets
duke_tweets = get_search_tweets(q = "#Duke", count = 200)
@test typeof(duke_tweets) <: Dict

#test sending/deleting direct messages
#commenting out because Twitter API changed. Come back to fix
# send_dm = post_direct_messages_send(text = "Testing from Julia, this might disappear later $(time())", screen_name = "randyzwitch")
# get_single_dm = get_direct_messages_show(id = send_dm.id)
# destroy = post_direct_messages_destroy(id = send_dm.id)
# @test typeof(send_dm) == Tweets
# @test typeof(get_single_dm) == Tweets
# @test typeof(destroy) == Tweets

#creating/destroying friendships
add_friend = post_friendships_create(screen_name = "kyrieirving")

unfollow = post_friendships_destroy(screen_name = "kyrieirving")
unfollow_df = DataFrame(unfollow)
@test typeof(add_friend) == Users
@test typeof(unfollow) == Users
@test size(unfollow_df)[2] == 40

# create a cursor for follower ids
follow_cursor_test = get_followers_ids(screen_name = "twitter", count = 10_000)
@test length(follow_cursor_test["ids"]) == 10_000

# create a cursor for friend ids - use barackobama because he follows a lot of accounts!
friend_cursor_test = get_friends_ids(screen_name = "BarackObama", count = 10_000)
@test length(friend_cursor_test["ids"]) == 10_000

# create a test for home timelines
home_t = get_home_timeline(count = 2)
@test length(home_t) > 1

# TEST of cursoring functionality on user timelines
user_t = get_user_timeline(screen_name = "stefanjwojcik", count = 400)
@test length(user_t) == 400
# get the minimum ID of the tweets returned (the earliest)
minid = minimum(x.id for x in user_t);

# now iterate until you hit that tweet: should return 399
# WARNING: current versions of julia cannot use keywords in macros? read here: https://github.com/JuliaLang/julia/pull/29261
# eventually replace since_id = minid
tweets_since = get_user_timeline(screen_name = "stefanjwojcik", count = 400, since_id = 1001808621053898752, include_rts=1)

@test length(tweets_since)>=399

# testing get_mentions_timeline
mentions = get_mentions_timeline(screen_name = "stefanjwojcik", count = 300) 
@test length(mentions) >= 50 #sometimes API doesn't return number requested (twitter API specifies count is the max returned, may be much lower)
@test Tweets<:typeof(mentions[1])

# testing retweets_of_me
my_rts = get_retweets_of_me(count = 300)
@test Tweets<:typeof(my_rts[1])

Want to contribute?

Contributions are welcome! Kindly refer to the contribution guidelines.

Linux: Build Status 

CodeCov: codecov

Author: Randyzwitch
Source Code: https://github.com/randyzwitch/Twitter.jl 
License: View license

#julia #api #twitter 

Otho  Hagenes

Otho Hagenes

1619511840

Making Sales More Efficient: Lead Qualification Using AI

If you were to ask any organization today, you would learn that they are all becoming reliant on Artificial Intelligence Solutions and using AI to digitally transform in order to bring their organizations into the new age. AI is no longer a new concept, instead, with the technological advancements that are being made in the realm of AI, it has become a much-needed business facet.

AI has become easier to use and implement than ever before, and every business is applying AI solutions to their processes. Organizations have begun to base their digital transformation strategies around AI and the way in which they conduct their business. One of these business processes that AI has helped transform is lead qualifications.

#ai-solutions-development #artificial-intelligence #future-of-artificial-intellige #ai #ai-applications #ai-trends #future-of-ai #ai-revolution