4 Timeless Lessons I Learned About Leadership From Joan of Arc

Think of someone who is a leader. It could be someone well known like Albert Einstein or Sojourner Truth. Or maybe it is a friend, a coworker, or a family member. What makes them a leader? What have they done to influence or inspire you? Are they the type of leader you wouldn’t mind becoming?

To guide your contemplation of this, allow me to share two of my favorites.

During a time marked by a system of racial segregation in South Africa called apartheidNelson Mandela rose to acclaim as a politically-driven anti-apartheid activist, spent twenty-seven years in prison for his work, and aided in apartheid’s abolishment in the early 1990s. Later, he became South Africa’s first Black and democratically elected president.

In the early 1400s,Joan of Arc, a young peasant girl, believing that God had called her to defeat the English in the Hundred Years’ War, entreated an army from the heir to the throne, Charles VII. She proceeded to lead attacks against the English (the most well known of which were at Orleans) and helped crown Charles VII as king while gaining support from her people.

What change do you desire to see in the future? What kind of ideas do you have to contribute to the greater good?

We say we want to progress or change, but who will rise to the occasion to make that happen? Who will be a voice for those who cannot find theirs or don’t have one? Who will become a leader?

Here’s what I have learned about leadership from Joan of Arc and Nelson Mandela.

A leader leaves an impact.

Through his efforts, Nelson Mandela left his mark by aiding in the liberation of his people from the constraints of apartheid.

It was no quick feat. He began his work in politics in 1942 and joined the African National Congress (ANC) in 1944. But apartheid wasn’t abolished until the early 1990s, around 50 years after his start.

#history #leadership-development #leadership #self-improvement

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4 Timeless Lessons I Learned About Leadership From Joan of Arc

5 Leadership Lessons From Changing a Light Bulb at 2 a.m.

What a 3rd shift team of union “misfits” taught me about leadership

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During my summers between college, I interned at an auto parts manufacturing company. My major was Industrial Management, so getting experience “on the manufacturing floor” was vital to advancing my knowledge. If I was ever to get a job after college, I needed some real-world experience. Nothing I learned at school prepared me for what I experienced in a major union manufacturing plant.

As a student, I read “In Search of Excellence,” and other leading quality-oriented books. I knew of Dr. Deming and the success of his programs. I had a positive ideological outlook on the US manufacturing business. Working in a tier-one parts provider was going to expose me to all that was right with the “Made in the USA” label. I was in for a big surprise.

During the summer, I learned five critical leadership lessons. They are:

  1. Serve First
  2. Build Trust
  3. The Team, The Team, The Team
  4. Focus On The Outcome
  5. Discipline Is A Failure Of Leadership

These lessons found me I didn’t seek them out, nor did I do any heroic act to earn them. I was failing as a leader. Before we can get into the learning, we need to first visit with my failure. So first, the bad news. As a leader, I was awful!

“For the times, they are a changin” Bob Dylan

Almost everyone knows the United States automobile manufacturing business suffered in the ’80s and ’90s. Competition from foreign brands intensified, and “Made in the USA” quality seemed to be fading. The plant where I worked was no different. Everyone involved in management felt the heat. Production efficiency (a quality and quantity measurement) was vital and measured every shift.

Every morning began with a management meeting to review production quality and discuss issues and topics around the plant. It was during one of those meetings I was assigned to the 3rd Shift as Production Supervisor. The regular manager was on sick leave for a heart condition. For most of the summer, I would lead the 3rd Shift team. Along with my move to leadership, we were instituting a new quality and efficiency program for all shifts.

The quality and production initiative was vital to the viability of the Press Room. My new department. Product quality needed to improve to stay competitive. If we didn’t improve, management would close the department and outsource the parts. Obviously, jobs would be lost. I remember the General Supervisor saying, while looking directly at me, “You are gonna carry a big stick and pound these guys until we get good parts.” It seemed the plan for improving quality hinged on better discipline. I admit doubt crept in. How was that going to work? The new plan? Write up everyone who runs bad parts. It seemed we were going to war against the production line workers.

Production efficiency was measured on a scale from 0 to 100%. One hundred percent meant the production quality and production was excellent. At the time I was installed, the production efficiency for the 3rd shift hovered around 49%. The company lost money every night; the third shift worked.

The line workers were unionized, and tensions with management were always present for some of the employees. But not all workers fit the negative stereotype. During my time in the plant, I found that most production workers wanted to do a good job.

#management #leadership-skills #lessons-learned #leadership #learning #deep learning

4 Timeless Lessons I Learned About Leadership From Joan of Arc

Think of someone who is a leader. It could be someone well known like Albert Einstein or Sojourner Truth. Or maybe it is a friend, a coworker, or a family member. What makes them a leader? What have they done to influence or inspire you? Are they the type of leader you wouldn’t mind becoming?

To guide your contemplation of this, allow me to share two of my favorites.

During a time marked by a system of racial segregation in South Africa called apartheidNelson Mandela rose to acclaim as a politically-driven anti-apartheid activist, spent twenty-seven years in prison for his work, and aided in apartheid’s abolishment in the early 1990s. Later, he became South Africa’s first Black and democratically elected president.

In the early 1400s,Joan of Arc, a young peasant girl, believing that God had called her to defeat the English in the Hundred Years’ War, entreated an army from the heir to the throne, Charles VII. She proceeded to lead attacks against the English (the most well known of which were at Orleans) and helped crown Charles VII as king while gaining support from her people.

What change do you desire to see in the future? What kind of ideas do you have to contribute to the greater good?

We say we want to progress or change, but who will rise to the occasion to make that happen? Who will be a voice for those who cannot find theirs or don’t have one? Who will become a leader?

Here’s what I have learned about leadership from Joan of Arc and Nelson Mandela.

A leader leaves an impact.

Through his efforts, Nelson Mandela left his mark by aiding in the liberation of his people from the constraints of apartheid.

It was no quick feat. He began his work in politics in 1942 and joined the African National Congress (ANC) in 1944. But apartheid wasn’t abolished until the early 1990s, around 50 years after his start.

#history #leadership-development #leadership #self-improvement

Matteo  Renner

Matteo Renner

1617792300

The Most Important Programming Lesson I Ever Learned

In the fall of 2012, I walked into my graduate advisor’s office and asked her which computer science class she recommended for me to enroll in. I explained that I was a complete novice in programming. She suggested Introduction to C Programming.

After attending a few lectures, I discover that the majority of the students I spoke to in this introductorycourse had some prior experience in programming.

Six weeks and 80 hours of work later, I dropped the course.

Enter spring semester of 2013. I enrolled in an easier computer science course, Introduction to Computer Programming via the Web. I breezed through the first quarter of the course, executing HTML and CSS with ease. Then, we started Javascript (JS). That feeling of constant anxiety and stress from my previous computer science course returned in full fashion. It was too late in the semester to drop the course, so I asked a friend for help.

#debugging #learning-to-code #learning-to-program #computer-science-basics #how-to-start-learning-to-code #python-programming #learn-javascript #learn-python #web-monetization

Simpliv LLC

Simpliv LLC

1582887065

Leadership Courses | Learn How to Speak Like a Leader | Simpliv

Description
Imagine that every time you speak, people perceive you as a confident and authoritative leader. Wouldn’t it be nice to know that you can speak in a confident manner and in a way that is instantly understandable and memorable to your audience?

In this How to Speak Like a Leader course you will learn the following:

How to avid the most common speaking blunders that undermine authority
How to increase eye contact with your audience
How to structure your presentation so that you don’t seem like a mid-level bureaucrat
How to prepare in the least amount of time possible
This course is delivered primarily through spoken lecture. Because the skill you are learning is speaking related, it only makes sense that you learn through speaking.

The skill you will learn in this class is not primarily theoretical or academic. It is a skill that requires physical habits. That is why you will be asked to take part in numerous exercises where you record yourself speaking on video, and then watching yourself. Learning presentation skills is like learning how to ride a bicycle. You simply have to do it numerous times and work past the wobbling and falling off parts until you get it right.

This course contain numerous video lectures plus several bonus books for your training library.

TJ Walker has been coaching and training people on their presentation skills for 30 years. Now, through the power of Simpliv’s online platform, he is able to give you the same high quality training that he gives in person to CEOs, Fortune 500 executives, and Presidents of countries. Only you can now receive the training at a tiny fraction of the normal fee for in-person training.

How long this course takes is up to you. The longest part of the course involves you speaking on video, critiquing yourself, and doing it over until you like it. But if you get to the point where you love how you look and sound when you present it will be well worth the time spent. And having this skill will save you time for all future presentations in your life.

You can begin improving your leadership presentation skills right now. You may have an opportunity to speak out as soon as tomorrow, so why waste another day worried that your presentation skills are not up to high standards. Enroll in this course today.

There is a 100% Money-Back Guarantee for this course. And the instructor also provides an enhanced guarantee.

What others say:

“TJ Walker’s single-minded devotion to presentation has made him the #1 expert for executives seeking guidance on speaking to the public and media." Bob Bowdon, Anchor/Reporter, Bloomberg Television

“TJ Walker is the leading media trainer in the world." Stu Miller, Viacom News Producer

(TJ Walker’s Media Training Worldwide) “The world’s leading presentation and media training firm."Gregg Jarrett, Fox News Channel Anchor

Who is the target audience?

Anyone how is a leader or who aspires to be a leader
Leaders who wish to speak more effectively
Basic knowledge
Students will need to record themselves speaking using a cellphone camera or webcam
What will you learn
Speak with the confidence and authority of a leader
Project competence
Present ideas in an understandable manner
Make your key ideas memorable to your audience

ENROLL

#Leadership and Management Online Courses #Learn Leadership with Online Leadership Courses #Leadership Courses #Online Leadership Course

Five Timeless Product Management Lessons

For those of you who don’t know him, Michael Scott was an effervescent fictional character played by Steve Carell on a mockumentary sitcom called “The Office.”

With 42 Emmy nominations, it consistently ranked high on the viewership board of Netflix and is a Top 5 contender in almost every “Best Sitcom” list published. 15 years since its inception, viewers keep coming back to it. According to Nielsen research, The Office ranked as the most-watched show on Netflix in 2018, with 52 million minutes streamed — more than 20 million more than Friends.

An example of User Retention if nothing else.

But we don’t talk about the show in terms of actual business lessons. But if we look closer at Michael Scott-ness, we can draw Product Management pearls of wisdom from it. Here, five PM lessons from the world’s best boss.

1. Be a people person

Number one on our list is People. Throughout the show, Michael Scott cares for people around him in his very own unique way. Whether it is visiting Pam at her Art exhibition or subtle things like opening the door for the cameraman when he drives himself into the lake.

Michael makes an effort to connect with people, so much so he sometimes cares about their well being more than their performance at the job. This empathy extends to his co-workers, friends (not always a mutually exclusive group), and to his clients.

📢 “The most important thing for a company is the people. The people. People” — Michael Scott

This is the cornerstone of Product Management and cannot be stressed enough.PMs can only achieve things with others.

You know how to code an ML algorithm? Linear regression maybe? Great. You understand design heuristics principles by Jakob Nielsen? Brilliant. You’ve cracked the perfect sales pitch for the product? Way to go.

#product-management #office #learning #leadership-development #leadership #deep learning