Wanda  Huel

Wanda Huel

1603249200

A computational approach to the Prisoner’s Dilemma

You and your friend have committed a murder. A few days later, the cops pick the two of you up and put you in two separate interrogation rooms such that you have no communication with each other. You think your life is over, but the police offer up a deal:

Rat your friend out, and your sentence will be lighter.

The catch is that your friend is offered this deal, too.

More specifically, if you rat your friend out but your friend says nothing, they get a heavy sentence and you get a light one. If you rat each other out, there’s a heavy penalty for both. If both of you stay silent, the sentences are light for you and your friend.

The decisions must be made without communicating with each other, and both you and your friend only have two choices: “defect” and rat them out, or “withhold” information from the cops and stay silent.

Take a look at the following diagram that describes your choices and sentences:

Image for post

A punishment diagram for you and your friend.

The matrix describes the number of years the two of you get depending on what you and your friend independently choose to do. The first number represents your prison time and the second represents your friend’s.

For example, if you withhold information from the cops, but your friend chooses to rat you out, you get five years in a maximum-security prison but your friend only gets one.

What would you do in this situation?

What should you do in this situation?

There’s no easy solution to this problem and there are a lot of interpretations to this. A utilitarian might say withholding is the better option because it minimizes the total number of years either person spends in prison (5 + 1 or 3 + 3 as opposed to 10 + 10). What does probability say?

#crime #game-theory #simulation #data-visualization #data-science

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Buddha Community

A computational approach to the Prisoner’s Dilemma

How to Predict Housing Prices with Linear Regression?

How-to-Predict-Housing-Prices-with-Linear-Regression

The final objective is to estimate the cost of a certain house in a Boston suburb. In 1970, the Boston Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area provided the information. To examine and modify the data, we will use several techniques such as data pre-processing and feature engineering. After that, we'll apply a statistical model like regression model to anticipate and monitor the real estate market.

Project Outline:

  • EDA
  • Feature Engineering
  • Pick and Train a Model
  • Interpret
  • Conclusion

EDA

Before using a statistical model, the EDA is a good step to go through in order to:

  • Recognize the data set
  • Check to see if any information is missing.
  • Find some outliers.
  • To get more out of the data, add, alter, or eliminate some features.

Importing the Libraries

  • Recognize the data set
  • Check to see if any information is missing.
  • Find some outliers.
  • To get more out of the data, add, alter, or eliminate some features.

# Import the libraries #Dataframe/Numerical libraries import pandas as pd import numpy as np #Data visualization import plotly.express as px import matplotlib import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import seaborn as sns #Machine learning model from sklearn.linear_model import LinearRegression

Reading the Dataset with Pandas

#Reading the data path='./housing.csv' housing_df=pd.read_csv(path,header=None,delim_whitespace=True)

 CRIMZNINDUSCHASNOXRMAGEDISRADTAXPTRATIOBLSTATMEDV
00.0063218.02.3100.5386.57565.24.09001296.015.3396.904.9824.0
10.027310.07.0700.4696.42178.94.96712242.017.8396.909.1421.6
20.027290.07.0700.4697.18561.14.96712242.017.8392.834.0334.7
30.032370.02.1800.4586.99845.86.06223222.018.7394.632.9433.4
40.069050.02.1800.4587.14754.26.06223222.018.7396.905.3336.2
.............................................
5010.062630.011.9300.5736.59369.12.47861273.021.0391.999.6722.4
5020.045270.011.9300.5736.12076.72.28751273.021.0396.909.0820.6
5030.060760.011.9300.5736.97691.02.16751273.021.0396.905.6423.9
5040.109590.011.9300.5736.79489.32.38891273.021.0393.456.4822.0
5050.047410.011.9300.5736.03080.82.50501273.021.0396.907.8811.9

Have a Look at the Columns

Crime: It refers to a town's per capita crime rate.

ZN: It is the percentage of residential land allocated for 25,000 square feet.

Indus: The amount of non-retail business lands per town is referred to as the indus.

CHAS: CHAS denotes whether or not the land is surrounded by a river.

NOX: The NOX stands for nitric oxide content (part per 10m)

RM: The average number of rooms per home is referred to as RM.

AGE: The percentage of owner-occupied housing built before 1940 is referred to as AGE.

DIS: Weighted distance to five Boston employment centers are referred to as dis.

RAD: Accessibility to radial highways index

TAX: The TAX columns denote the rate of full-value property taxes per $10,000 dollars.

B: B=1000(Bk — 0.63)2 is the outcome of the equation, where Bk is the proportion of blacks in each town.

PTRATIO: It refers to the student-to-teacher ratio in each community.

LSTAT: It refers to the population's lower socioeconomic status.

MEDV: It refers to the 1000-dollar median value of owner-occupied residences.

Data Preprocessing

# Check if there is any missing values. housing_df.isna().sum() CRIM       0 ZN         0 INDUS      0 CHAS       0 NOX        0 RM         0 AGE        0 DIS        0 RAD        0 TAX        0 PTRATIO    0 B          0 LSTAT      0 MEDV       0 dtype: int64

No missing values are found

We examine our data's mean, standard deviation, and percentiles.

housing_df.describe()

Graph Data

 CRIMZNINDUSCHASNOXRMAGEDISRADTAXPTRATIOBLSTATMEDV
count506.000000506.000000506.000000506.000000506.000000506.000000506.000000506.000000506.000000506.000000506.000000506.000000506.000000506.000000
mean3.61352411.36363611.1367790.0691700.5546956.28463468.5749013.7950439.549407408.23715418.455534356.67403212.65306322.532806
std8.60154523.3224536.8603530.2539940.1158780.70261728.1488612.1057108.707259168.5371162.16494691.2948647.1410629.197104
min0.0063200.0000000.4600000.0000000.3850003.5610002.9000001.1296001.000000187.00000012.6000000.3200001.7300005.000000
25%0.0820450.0000005.1900000.0000000.4490005.88550045.0250002.1001754.000000279.00000017.400000375.3775006.95000017.025000
50%0.2565100.0000009.6900000.0000000.5380006.20850077.5000003.2074505.000000330.00000019.050000391.44000011.36000021.200000
75%3.67708312.50000018.1000000.0000000.6240006.62350094.0750005.18842524.000000666.00000020.200000396.22500016.95500025.000000
max88.976200100.00000027.7400001.0000000.8710008.780000100.00000012.12650024.000000711.00000022.000000396.90000037.97000050.000000

The crime, area, sector, nitric oxides, 'B' appear to have multiple outliers at first look because the minimum and maximum values are so far apart. In the Age columns, the mean and the Q2(50 percentile) do not match.

We might double-check it by examining the distribution of each column.

Inferences

  1. The rate of crime is rather low. The majority of values are in the range of 0 to 25. With a huge value and a value of zero.
  2. The majority of residential land is zoned for less than 25,000 square feet. Land zones larger than 25,000 square feet represent a small portion of the dataset.
  3. The percentage of non-retial commercial acres is mostly split between two ranges: 0-13 and 13-23.
  4. The majority of the properties are bordered by the river, although a tiny portion of the data is not.
  5. The content of nitrite dioxide has been trending lower from.3 to.7, with a little bump towards.8. It is permissible to leave a value in the range of 0.1–1.
  6. The number of rooms tends to cluster around the average.
  7. With time, the proportion of owner-occupied units rises.
  8. As the number of weights grows, the weight distance between 5 employment centers reduces. It could indicate that individuals choose to live in new high-employment areas.
  9. People choose to live in places with limited access to roadways (0-10). We have a 30th percentile outlier.
  10. The majority of dwelling taxes are in the range of $200-450, with large outliers around $700,000.
  11. The percentage of people with lower status tends to cluster around the median. The majority of persons are of lower social standing.

Because the model is overly generic, removing all outliers will underfit it. Keeping all outliers causes the model to overfit and become excessively accurate. The data's noise will be learned.

The approach is to establish a happy medium that prevents the model from becoming overly precise. When faced with a new set of data, however, they generalise well.

We'll keep numbers below 600 because there's a huge anomaly in the TAX column around 600.

new_df=housing_df[housing_df['TAX']<600]

Looking at the Distribution

Looking-at-the-Distribution

The overall distribution, particularly the TAX, PTRATIO, and RAD, has improved slightly.

Correlation

Correlation

Perfect correlation is denoted by the clear values. The medium correlation between the columns is represented by the reds, while the negative correlation is represented by the black.

With a value of 0.89, we can see that 'MEDV', which is the medium price we wish to anticipate, is substantially connected with the number of rooms 'RM'. The proportion of black people in area 'B' with a value of 0.19 is followed by the residential land 'ZN' with a value of 0.32 and the percentage of black people in area 'ZN' with a value of 0.32.

The metrics that are most connected with price will be plotted.

The-metrics-that-are-most-connected

Feature Engineering

Feature Scaling

Gradient descent is aided by feature scaling, which ensures that all features are on the same scale. It makes locating the local optimum much easier.

Mean standardization is one strategy to employ. It substitutes (target-mean) for the target to ensure that the feature has a mean of nearly zero.

def standard(X):    '''Standard makes the feature 'X' have a zero mean'''    mu=np.mean(X) #mean    std=np.std(X) #standard deviation    sta=(X-mu)/std # mean normalization    return mu,std,sta     mu,std,sta=standard(X) X=sta X

 CRIMZNINDUSCHASNOXRMAGEDISRADTAXPTRATIOBLSTAT
0-0.6091290.092792-1.019125-0.2809760.2586700.2791350.162095-0.167660-2.105767-0.235130-1.1368630.401318-0.933659
1-0.575698-0.598153-0.225291-0.280976-0.4237950.0492520.6482660.250975-1.496334-1.032339-0.0041750.401318-0.219350
2-0.575730-0.598153-0.225291-0.280976-0.4237951.1897080.0165990.250975-1.496334-1.032339-0.0041750.298315-1.096782
3-0.567639-0.598153-1.040806-0.280976-0.5325940.910565-0.5263500.773661-0.886900-1.3276010.4035930.343869-1.283945
4-0.509220-0.598153-1.040806-0.280976-0.5325941.132984-0.2282610.773661-0.886900-1.3276010.4035930.401318-0.873561
..........................................
501-0.519445-0.5981530.585220-0.2809760.6048480.3060040.300494-0.936773-2.105767-0.5746821.4456660.277056-0.128344
502-0.547094-0.5981530.585220-0.2809760.604848-0.4000630.570195-1.027984-2.105767-0.5746821.4456660.401318-0.229652
503-0.522423-0.5981530.585220-0.2809760.6048480.8777251.077657-1.085260-2.105767-0.5746821.4456660.401318-0.820331
504-0.444652-0.5981530.585220-0.2809760.6048480.6060461.017329-0.979587-2.105767-0.5746821.4456660.314006-0.676095
505-0.543685-0.5981530.585220-0.2809760.604848-0.5344100.715691-0.924173-2.105767-0.5746821.4456660.401318-0.435703

Choose and Train the Model

For the sake of the project, we'll apply linear regression.

Typically, we run numerous models and select the best one based on a particular criterion.

Linear regression is a sort of supervised learning model in which the response is continuous, as it relates to machine learning.

Form of Linear Regression

y= θX+θ1 or y= θ1+X1θ2 +X2θ3 + X3θ4

y is the target you will be predicting

0 is the coefficient

x is the input

We will Sklearn to develop and train the model

#Import the libraries to train the model from sklearn.model_selection import train_test_split from sklearn.linear_model import LinearRegression

Allow us to utilise the train/test method to learn a part of the data on one set and predict using another set using the train/test approach.

X_train,X_test,y_train,y_test=train_test_split(X,y,test_size=0.4) #Create and Train the model model=LinearRegression().fit(X_train,y_train) #Generate prediction predictions_test=model.predict(X_test) #Compute loss to evaluate the model coefficient= model.coef_ intercept=model.intercept_ print(coefficient,intercept) [7.22218258] 24.66379606613584

In this example, you will learn the model using below hypothesis:

Price= 24.85 + 7.18* Room

It is interpreted as:

For a decided price of a house:

A 7.18-unit increase in the price is connected with a growth in the number of rooms.

As a side note, this is an association, not a cause!

Interpretation

You will need a metric to determine whether our hypothesis was right. The RMSE approach will be used.

Root Means Square Error (RMSE) is defined as the square root of the mean of square error. The difference between the true and anticipated numbers called the error. It's popular because it can be expressed in y-units, which is the median price of a home in our scenario.

def rmse(predict,actual):    return np.sqrt(np.mean(np.square(predict - actual))) # Split the Data into train and test set X_train,X_test,y_train,y_test=train_test_split(X,y,test_size=0.4) #Create and Train the model model=LinearRegression().fit(X_train,y_train) #Generate prediction predictions_test=model.predict(X_test) #Compute loss to evaluate the model coefficient= model.coef_ intercept=model.intercept_ print(coefficient,intercept) loss=rmse(predictions_test,y_test) print('loss: ',loss) print(model.score(X_test,y_test)) #accuracy [7.43327725] 24.912055881970886 loss: 3.9673165450580714 0.7552661033654667 Loss will be 3.96

This means that y-units refer to the median value of occupied homes with 1000 dollars.

This will be less by 3960 dollars.

While learning the model you will have a high variance when you divide the data. Coefficient and intercept will vary. It's because when we utilized the train/test approach, we choose a set of data at random to place in either the train or test set. As a result, our theory will change each time the dataset is divided.

This problem can be solved using a technique called cross-validation.

Improvisation in the Model

With 'Forward Selection,' we'll iterate through each parameter to assist us choose the numbers characteristics to include in our model.

Forward Selection

  1. Choose the most appropriate variable (in our case based on high correlation)
  2. Add the next best variable to the model
  3. Some predetermined conditions must meet.

We'll use a random state of 1 so that each iteration yields the same outcome.

cols=[] los=[] los_train=[] scor=[] i=0 while i < len(high_corr_var):    cols.append(high_corr_var[i])        # Select inputs variables    X=new_df[cols]        #mean normalization    mu,std,sta=standard(X)    X=sta        # Split the data into training and testing    X_train,X_test,y_train,y_test= train_test_split(X,y,random_state=1)        #fit the model to the training    lnreg=LinearRegression().fit(X_train,y_train)        #make prediction on the training test    prediction_train=lnreg.predict(X_train)        #make prediction on the testing test    prediction=lnreg.predict(X_test)        #compute the loss on train test    loss=rmse(prediction,y_test)    loss_train=rmse(prediction_train,y_train)    los_train.append(loss_train)    los.append(loss)        #compute the score    score=lnreg.score(X_test,y_test)    scor.append(score)        i+=1

We have a big 'loss' with a smaller collection of variables, yet our system will overgeneralize in this scenario. Although we have a reduced 'loss,' we have a large number of variables. However, if the model grows too precise, it may not generalize well to new data.

In order for our model to generalize well with another set of data, we might use 6 or 7 features. The characteristic chosen is descending based on how strong the price correlation is.

high_corr_var ['RM', 'ZN', 'B', 'CHAS', 'RAD', 'DIS', 'CRIM', 'NOX', 'AGE', 'TAX', 'INDUS', 'PTRATIO', 'LSTAT']

With 'RM' having a high price correlation and LSTAT having a negative price correlation.

# Create a list of features names feature_cols=['RM','ZN','B','CHAS','RAD','CRIM','DIS','NOX'] #Select inputs variables X=new_df[feature_cols] # Split the data into training and testing sets X_train,X_test,y_train,y_test= train_test_split(X,y, random_state=1) # feature engineering mu,std,sta=standard(X) X=sta # fit the model to the trainning data lnreg=LinearRegression().fit(X_train,y_train) # make prediction on the testing test prediction=lnreg.predict(X_test) # compute the loss loss=rmse(prediction,y_test) print('loss: ',loss) lnreg.score(X_test,y_test) loss: 3.212659865936143 0.8582338376696363

The test set yielded a loss of 3.21 and an accuracy of 85%.

Other factors, such as alpha, the learning rate at which our model learns, could still be tweaked to improve our model. Alternatively, return to the preprocessing section and working to increase the parameter distribution.

For more details regarding scraping real estate data you can contact Scraping Intelligence today

https://www.websitescraper.com/how-to-predict-housing-prices-with-linear-regression.php

Thurman  Mills

Thurman Mills

1620874140

Cloud Computing Vs Grid Computing

The similarity between cloud computing and grid computing is uncanny. The underlying concepts that make these two inherently different are actually so similar to one and another, which is responsible for creating a lot of confusion. Both cloud and grid computing aims to provide a similar kind of services to a large user base by sharing assets among an enormous pool of clients.

Both of these technologies are obviously network-based and are capable enough to sport multitasking. The availability of multitasking allows the users of either of the two services to use multiple applications at the same time. You are also not limited to the kind of applications that you can use. You are free to choose any number of applications that can accomplish any tasks that you want. Learn more about cloud computing applications.

#cloud computing #cloud computing vs grid computing #grid computing #cloud

Rust  Language

Rust Language

1636360749

Std Library Types in Rust - The Rust Programming Language

Std Library Types - Rust By Example

The std library provides many custom types which expands drastically on the primitives. Some of these include:

  • growable Strings like: "hello world"
  • growable vectors: [1, 2, 3]
  • optional types: Option<i32>
  • error handling types: Result<i32, i32>
  • heap allocated pointers: Box<i32>

Box, stack and heap

All values in Rust are stack allocated by default. Values can be boxed (allocated on the heap) by creating a Box<T>. A box is a smart pointer to a heap allocated value of type T. When a box goes out of scope, its destructor is called, the inner object is destroyed, and the memory on the heap is freed.

Boxed values can be dereferenced using the * operator; this removes one layer of indirection.

use std::mem;

#[allow(dead_code)]
#[derive(Debug, Clone, Copy)]
struct Point {
    x: f64,
    y: f64,
}

// A Rectangle can be specified by where its top left and bottom right 
// corners are in space
#[allow(dead_code)]
struct Rectangle {
    top_left: Point,
    bottom_right: Point,
}

fn origin() -> Point {
    Point { x: 0.0, y: 0.0 }
}

fn boxed_origin() -> Box<Point> {
    // Allocate this point on the heap, and return a pointer to it
    Box::new(Point { x: 0.0, y: 0.0 })
}

fn main() {
    // (all the type annotations are superfluous)
    // Stack allocated variables
    let point: Point = origin();
    let rectangle: Rectangle = Rectangle {
        top_left: origin(),
        bottom_right: Point { x: 3.0, y: -4.0 }
    };

    // Heap allocated rectangle
    let boxed_rectangle: Box<Rectangle> = Box::new(Rectangle {
        top_left: origin(),
        bottom_right: Point { x: 3.0, y: -4.0 },
    });

    // The output of functions can be boxed
    let boxed_point: Box<Point> = Box::new(origin());

    // Double indirection
    let box_in_a_box: Box<Box<Point>> = Box::new(boxed_origin());

    println!("Point occupies {} bytes on the stack",
             mem::size_of_val(&point));
    println!("Rectangle occupies {} bytes on the stack",
             mem::size_of_val(&rectangle));

    // box size == pointer size
    println!("Boxed point occupies {} bytes on the stack",
             mem::size_of_val(&boxed_point));
    println!("Boxed rectangle occupies {} bytes on the stack",
             mem::size_of_val(&boxed_rectangle));
    println!("Boxed box occupies {} bytes on the stack",
             mem::size_of_val(&box_in_a_box));

    // Copy the data contained in `boxed_point` into `unboxed_point`
    let unboxed_point: Point = *boxed_point;
    println!("Unboxed point occupies {} bytes on the stack",
             mem::size_of_val(&unboxed_point));
}

Vectors

Vectors are re-sizable arrays. Like slices, their size is not known at compile time, but they can grow or shrink at any time. A vector is represented using 3 parameters:

  • pointer to the data
  • length
  • capacity

The capacity indicates how much memory is reserved for the vector. The vector can grow as long as the length is smaller than the capacity. When this threshold needs to be surpassed, the vector is reallocated with a larger capacity.

fn main() {
    // Iterators can be collected into vectors
    let collected_iterator: Vec<i32> = (0..10).collect();
    println!("Collected (0..10) into: {:?}", collected_iterator);

    // The `vec!` macro can be used to initialize a vector
    let mut xs = vec![1i32, 2, 3];
    println!("Initial vector: {:?}", xs);

    // Insert new element at the end of the vector
    println!("Push 4 into the vector");
    xs.push(4);
    println!("Vector: {:?}", xs);

    // Error! Immutable vectors can't grow
    collected_iterator.push(0);
    // FIXME ^ Comment out this line

    // The `len` method yields the number of elements currently stored in a vector
    println!("Vector length: {}", xs.len());

    // Indexing is done using the square brackets (indexing starts at 0)
    println!("Second element: {}", xs[1]);

    // `pop` removes the last element from the vector and returns it
    println!("Pop last element: {:?}", xs.pop());

    // Out of bounds indexing yields a panic
    println!("Fourth element: {}", xs[3]);
    // FIXME ^ Comment out this line

    // `Vector`s can be easily iterated over
    println!("Contents of xs:");
    for x in xs.iter() {
        println!("> {}", x);
    }

    // A `Vector` can also be iterated over while the iteration
    // count is enumerated in a separate variable (`i`)
    for (i, x) in xs.iter().enumerate() {
        println!("In position {} we have value {}", i, x);
    }

    // Thanks to `iter_mut`, mutable `Vector`s can also be iterated
    // over in a way that allows modifying each value
    for x in xs.iter_mut() {
        *x *= 3;
    }
    println!("Updated vector: {:?}", xs);
}

More Vec methods can be found under the std::vec module


Strings

There are two types of strings in Rust: String and &str.

A String is stored as a vector of bytes (Vec<u8>), but guaranteed to always be a valid UTF-8 sequence. String is heap allocated, growable and not null terminated.

&str is a slice (&[u8]) that always points to a valid UTF-8 sequence, and can be used to view into a String, just like &[T] is a view into Vec<T>.

fn main() {
    // (all the type annotations are superfluous)
    // A reference to a string allocated in read only memory
    let pangram: &'static str = "the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog";
    println!("Pangram: {}", pangram);

    // Iterate over words in reverse, no new string is allocated
    println!("Words in reverse");
    for word in pangram.split_whitespace().rev() {
        println!("> {}", word);
    }

    // Copy chars into a vector, sort and remove duplicates
    let mut chars: Vec<char> = pangram.chars().collect();
    chars.sort();
    chars.dedup();

    // Create an empty and growable `String`
    let mut string = String::new();
    for c in chars {
        // Insert a char at the end of string
        string.push(c);
        // Insert a string at the end of string
        string.push_str(", ");
    }

    // The trimmed string is a slice to the original string, hence no new
    // allocation is performed
    let chars_to_trim: &[char] = &[' ', ','];
    let trimmed_str: &str = string.trim_matches(chars_to_trim);
    println!("Used characters: {}", trimmed_str);

    // Heap allocate a string
    let alice = String::from("I like dogs");
    // Allocate new memory and store the modified string there
    let bob: String = alice.replace("dog", "cat");

    println!("Alice says: {}", alice);
    println!("Bob says: {}", bob);
}

More str/String methods can be found under the std::str and std::string modules

Literals and escapes

There are multiple ways to write string literals with special characters in them. All result in a similar &str so it's best to use the form that is the most convenient to write. Similarly there are multiple ways to write byte string literals, which all result in &[u8; N].

Generally special characters are escaped with a backslash character: \. This way you can add any character to your string, even unprintable ones and ones that you don't know how to type. If you want a literal backslash, escape it with another one: \\

String or character literal delimiters occuring within a literal must be escaped: "\"", '\''.

fn main() {
    // You can use escapes to write bytes by their hexadecimal values...
    let byte_escape = "I'm writing \x52\x75\x73\x74!";
    println!("What are you doing\x3F (\\x3F means ?) {}", byte_escape);

    // ...or Unicode code points.
    let unicode_codepoint = "\u{211D}";
    let character_name = "\"DOUBLE-STRUCK CAPITAL R\"";

    println!("Unicode character {} (U+211D) is called {}",
                unicode_codepoint, character_name );


    let long_string = "String literals
                        can span multiple lines.
                        The linebreak and indentation here ->\
                        <- can be escaped too!";
    println!("{}", long_string);
}

Sometimes there are just too many characters that need to be escaped or it's just much more convenient to write a string out as-is. This is where raw string literals come into play.

fn main() {
    let raw_str = r"Escapes don't work here: \x3F \u{211D}";
    println!("{}", raw_str);

    // If you need quotes in a raw string, add a pair of #s
    let quotes = r#"And then I said: "There is no escape!""#;
    println!("{}", quotes);

    // If you need "# in your string, just use more #s in the delimiter.
    // There is no limit for the number of #s you can use.
    let longer_delimiter = r###"A string with "# in it. And even "##!"###;
    println!("{}", longer_delimiter);
}

Want a string that's not UTF-8? (Remember, str and String must be valid UTF-8). Or maybe you want an array of bytes that's mostly text? Byte strings to the rescue!

use std::str;

fn main() {
    // Note that this is not actually a `&str`
    let bytestring: &[u8; 21] = b"this is a byte string";

    // Byte arrays don't have the `Display` trait, so printing them is a bit limited
    println!("A byte string: {:?}", bytestring);

    // Byte strings can have byte escapes...
    let escaped = b"\x52\x75\x73\x74 as bytes";
    // ...but no unicode escapes
    // let escaped = b"\u{211D} is not allowed";
    println!("Some escaped bytes: {:?}", escaped);


    // Raw byte strings work just like raw strings
    let raw_bytestring = br"\u{211D} is not escaped here";
    println!("{:?}", raw_bytestring);

    // Converting a byte array to `str` can fail
    if let Ok(my_str) = str::from_utf8(raw_bytestring) {
        println!("And the same as text: '{}'", my_str);
    }

    let _quotes = br#"You can also use "fancier" formatting, \
                    like with normal raw strings"#;

    // Byte strings don't have to be UTF-8
    let shift_jis = b"\x82\xe6\x82\xa8\x82\xb1\x82\xbb"; // "ようこそ" in SHIFT-JIS

    // But then they can't always be converted to `str`
    match str::from_utf8(shift_jis) {
        Ok(my_str) => println!("Conversion successful: '{}'", my_str),
        Err(e) => println!("Conversion failed: {:?}", e),
    };
}

For conversions between character encodings check out the encoding crate.

A more detailed listing of the ways to write string literals and escape characters is given in the 'Tokens' chapter of the Rust Reference.


Option

Sometimes it's desirable to catch the failure of some parts of a program instead of calling panic!; this can be accomplished using the Option enum.

The Option<T> enum has two variants:

  • None, to indicate failure or lack of value, and
  • Some(value), a tuple struct that wraps a value with type T.
// An integer division that doesn't `panic!`
fn checked_division(dividend: i32, divisor: i32) -> Option<i32> {
    if divisor == 0 {
        // Failure is represented as the `None` variant
        None
    } else {
        // Result is wrapped in a `Some` variant
        Some(dividend / divisor)
    }
}

// This function handles a division that may not succeed
fn try_division(dividend: i32, divisor: i32) {
    // `Option` values can be pattern matched, just like other enums
    match checked_division(dividend, divisor) {
        None => println!("{} / {} failed!", dividend, divisor),
        Some(quotient) => {
            println!("{} / {} = {}", dividend, divisor, quotient)
        },
    }
}

fn main() {
    try_division(4, 2);
    try_division(1, 0);

    // Binding `None` to a variable needs to be type annotated
    let none: Option<i32> = None;
    let _equivalent_none = None::<i32>;

    let optional_float = Some(0f32);

    // Unwrapping a `Some` variant will extract the value wrapped.
    println!("{:?} unwraps to {:?}", optional_float, optional_float.unwrap());

    // Unwrapping a `None` variant will `panic!`
    println!("{:?} unwraps to {:?}", none, none.unwrap());
}

Result

We've seen that the Option enum can be used as a return value from functions that may fail, where None can be returned to indicate failure. However, sometimes it is important to express why an operation failed. To do this we have the Result enum.

The Result<T, E> enum has two variants:

  • Ok(value) which indicates that the operation succeeded, and wraps the value returned by the operation. (value has type T)
  • Err(why), which indicates that the operation failed, and wraps why, which (hopefully) explains the cause of the failure. (why has type E)
mod checked {
    // Mathematical "errors" we want to catch
    #[derive(Debug)]
    pub enum MathError {
        DivisionByZero,
        NonPositiveLogarithm,
        NegativeSquareRoot,
    }

    pub type MathResult = Result<f64, MathError>;

    pub fn div(x: f64, y: f64) -> MathResult {
        if y == 0.0 {
            // This operation would `fail`, instead let's return the reason of
            // the failure wrapped in `Err`
            Err(MathError::DivisionByZero)
        } else {
            // This operation is valid, return the result wrapped in `Ok`
            Ok(x / y)
        }
    }

    pub fn sqrt(x: f64) -> MathResult {
        if x < 0.0 {
            Err(MathError::NegativeSquareRoot)
        } else {
            Ok(x.sqrt())
        }
    }

    pub fn ln(x: f64) -> MathResult {
        if x <= 0.0 {
            Err(MathError::NonPositiveLogarithm)
        } else {
            Ok(x.ln())
        }
    }
}

// `op(x, y)` === `sqrt(ln(x / y))`
fn op(x: f64, y: f64) -> f64 {
    // This is a three level match pyramid!
    match checked::div(x, y) {
        Err(why) => panic!("{:?}", why),
        Ok(ratio) => match checked::ln(ratio) {
            Err(why) => panic!("{:?}", why),
            Ok(ln) => match checked::sqrt(ln) {
                Err(why) => panic!("{:?}", why),
                Ok(sqrt) => sqrt,
            },
        },
    }
}

fn main() {
    // Will this fail?
    println!("{}", op(1.0, 10.0));
}

?

Chaining results using match can get pretty untidy; luckily, the ? operator can be used to make things pretty again. ? is used at the end of an expression returning a Result, and is equivalent to a match expression, where the Err(err) branch expands to an early Err(From::from(err)), and the Ok(ok) branch expands to an ok expression.

mod checked {
    #[derive(Debug)]
    enum MathError {
        DivisionByZero,
        NonPositiveLogarithm,
        NegativeSquareRoot,
    }

    type MathResult = Result<f64, MathError>;

    fn div(x: f64, y: f64) -> MathResult {
        if y == 0.0 {
            Err(MathError::DivisionByZero)
        } else {
            Ok(x / y)
        }
    }

    fn sqrt(x: f64) -> MathResult {
        if x < 0.0 {
            Err(MathError::NegativeSquareRoot)
        } else {
            Ok(x.sqrt())
        }
    }

    fn ln(x: f64) -> MathResult {
        if x <= 0.0 {
            Err(MathError::NonPositiveLogarithm)
        } else {
            Ok(x.ln())
        }
    }

    // Intermediate function
    fn op_(x: f64, y: f64) -> MathResult {
        // if `div` "fails", then `DivisionByZero` will be `return`ed
        let ratio = div(x, y)?;

        // if `ln` "fails", then `NonPositiveLogarithm` will be `return`ed
        let ln = ln(ratio)?;

        sqrt(ln)
    }

    pub fn op(x: f64, y: f64) {
        match op_(x, y) {
            Err(why) => panic!("{}", match why {
                MathError::NonPositiveLogarithm
                    => "logarithm of non-positive number",
                MathError::DivisionByZero
                    => "division by zero",
                MathError::NegativeSquareRoot
                    => "square root of negative number",
            }),
            Ok(value) => println!("{}", value),
        }
    }
}

fn main() {
    checked::op(1.0, 10.0);
}

Be sure to check the documentation, as there are many methods to map/compose Result.


panic!

The panic! macro can be used to generate a panic and start unwinding its stack. While unwinding, the runtime will take care of freeing all the resources owned by the thread by calling the destructor of all its objects.

Since we are dealing with programs with only one thread, panic! will cause the program to report the panic message and exit.

// Re-implementation of integer division (/)
fn division(dividend: i32, divisor: i32) -> i32 {
    if divisor == 0 {
        // Division by zero triggers a panic
        panic!("division by zero");
    } else {
        dividend / divisor
    }
}

// The `main` task
fn main() {
    // Heap allocated integer
    let _x = Box::new(0i32);

    // This operation will trigger a task failure
    division(3, 0);

    println!("This point won't be reached!");

    // `_x` should get destroyed at this point
}

Let's check that panic! doesn't leak memory.

$ rustc panic.rs && valgrind ./panic
==4401== Memcheck, a memory error detector
==4401== Copyright (C) 2002-2013, and GNU GPL'd, by Julian Seward et al.
==4401== Using Valgrind-3.10.0.SVN and LibVEX; rerun with -h for copyright info
==4401== Command: ./panic
==4401== 
thread '<main>' panicked at 'division by zero', panic.rs:5
==4401== 
==4401== HEAP SUMMARY:
==4401==     in use at exit: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==4401==   total heap usage: 18 allocs, 18 frees, 1,648 bytes allocated
==4401== 
==4401== All heap blocks were freed -- no leaks are possible
==4401== 
==4401== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==4401== ERROR SUMMARY: 0 errors from 0 contexts (suppressed: 0 from 0)

HashMap

Where vectors store values by an integer index, HashMaps store values by key. HashMap keys can be booleans, integers, strings, or any other type that implements the Eq and Hash traits. More on this in the next section.

Like vectors, HashMaps are growable, but HashMaps can also shrink themselves when they have excess space. You can create a HashMap with a certain starting capacity using HashMap::with_capacity(uint), or use HashMap::new() to get a HashMap with a default initial capacity (recommended).

use std::collections::HashMap;

fn call(number: &str) -> &str {
    match number {
        "798-1364" => "We're sorry, the call cannot be completed as dialed. 
            Please hang up and try again.",
        "645-7689" => "Hello, this is Mr. Awesome's Pizza. My name is Fred.
            What can I get for you today?",
        _ => "Hi! Who is this again?"
    }
}

fn main() { 
    let mut contacts = HashMap::new();

    contacts.insert("Daniel", "798-1364");
    contacts.insert("Ashley", "645-7689");
    contacts.insert("Katie", "435-8291");
    contacts.insert("Robert", "956-1745");

    // Takes a reference and returns Option<&V>
    match contacts.get(&"Daniel") {
        Some(&number) => println!("Calling Daniel: {}", call(number)),
        _ => println!("Don't have Daniel's number."),
    }

    // `HashMap::insert()` returns `None`
    // if the inserted value is new, `Some(value)` otherwise
    contacts.insert("Daniel", "164-6743");

    match contacts.get(&"Ashley") {
        Some(&number) => println!("Calling Ashley: {}", call(number)),
        _ => println!("Don't have Ashley's number."),
    }

    contacts.remove(&"Ashley"); 

    // `HashMap::iter()` returns an iterator that yields 
    // (&'a key, &'a value) pairs in arbitrary order.
    for (contact, &number) in contacts.iter() {
        println!("Calling {}: {}", contact, call(number)); 
    }
}

For more information on how hashing and hash maps (sometimes called hash tables) work, have a look at Hash Table Wikipedia

Alternate/custom key types

Any type that implements the Eq and Hash traits can be a key in HashMap. This includes:

  • bool (though not very useful since there is only two possible keys)
  • int, uint, and all variations thereof
  • String and &str (protip: you can have a HashMap keyed by String and call .get() with an &str)

Note that f32 and f64 do not implement Hash, likely because floating-point precision errors would make using them as hashmap keys horribly error-prone.

All collection classes implement Eq and Hash if their contained type also respectively implements Eq and Hash. For example, Vec<T> will implement Hash if T implements Hash.

You can easily implement Eq and Hash for a custom type with just one line: #[derive(PartialEq, Eq, Hash)]

The compiler will do the rest. If you want more control over the details, you can implement Eq and/or Hash yourself. This guide will not cover the specifics of implementing Hash.

To play around with using a struct in HashMap, let's try making a very simple user logon system:

use std::collections::HashMap;

// Eq requires that you derive PartialEq on the type.
#[derive(PartialEq, Eq, Hash)]
struct Account<'a>{
    username: &'a str,
    password: &'a str,
}

struct AccountInfo<'a>{
    name: &'a str,
    email: &'a str,
}

type Accounts<'a> = HashMap<Account<'a>, AccountInfo<'a>>;

fn try_logon<'a>(accounts: &Accounts<'a>,
        username: &'a str, password: &'a str){
    println!("Username: {}", username);
    println!("Password: {}", password);
    println!("Attempting logon...");

    let logon = Account {
        username,
        password,
    };

    match accounts.get(&logon) {
        Some(account_info) => {
            println!("Successful logon!");
            println!("Name: {}", account_info.name);
            println!("Email: {}", account_info.email);
        },
        _ => println!("Login failed!"),
    }
}

fn main(){
    let mut accounts: Accounts = HashMap::new();

    let account = Account {
        username: "j.everyman",
        password: "password123",
    };

    let account_info = AccountInfo {
        name: "John Everyman",
        email: "j.everyman@email.com",
    };

    accounts.insert(account, account_info);

    try_logon(&accounts, "j.everyman", "psasword123");

    try_logon(&accounts, "j.everyman", "password123");
}

HashSet

Consider a HashSet as a HashMap where we just care about the keys ( HashSet<T> is, in actuality, just a wrapper around HashMap<T, ()>).

"What's the point of that?" you ask. "I could just store the keys in a Vec."

A HashSet's unique feature is that it is guaranteed to not have duplicate elements. That's the contract that any set collection fulfills. HashSet is just one implementation. (see also: BTreeSet)

If you insert a value that is already present in the HashSet, (i.e. the new value is equal to the existing and they both have the same hash), then the new value will replace the old.

This is great for when you never want more than one of something, or when you want to know if you've already got something.

But sets can do more than that.

Sets have 4 primary operations (all of the following calls return an iterator):

union: get all the unique elements in both sets.

difference: get all the elements that are in the first set but not the second.

intersection: get all the elements that are only in both sets.

symmetric_difference: get all the elements that are in one set or the other, but not both.

Try all of these in the following example:

use std::collections::HashSet;

fn main() {
    let mut a: HashSet<i32> = vec![1i32, 2, 3].into_iter().collect();
    let mut b: HashSet<i32> = vec![2i32, 3, 4].into_iter().collect();

    assert!(a.insert(4));
    assert!(a.contains(&4));

    // `HashSet::insert()` returns false if
    // there was a value already present.
    assert!(b.insert(4), "Value 4 is already in set B!");
    // FIXME ^ Comment out this line

    b.insert(5);

    // If a collection's element type implements `Debug`,
    // then the collection implements `Debug`.
    // It usually prints its elements in the format `[elem1, elem2, ...]`
    println!("A: {:?}", a);
    println!("B: {:?}", b);

    // Print [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] in arbitrary order
    println!("Union: {:?}", a.union(&b).collect::<Vec<&i32>>());

    // This should print [1]
    println!("Difference: {:?}", a.difference(&b).collect::<Vec<&i32>>());

    // Print [2, 3, 4] in arbitrary order.
    println!("Intersection: {:?}", a.intersection(&b).collect::<Vec<&i32>>());

    // Print [1, 5]
    println!("Symmetric Difference: {:?}",
             a.symmetric_difference(&b).collect::<Vec<&i32>>());
}

(Examples are adapted from the documentation.)


Rc

When multiple ownership is needed, Rc(Reference Counting) can be used. Rc keeps track of the number of the references which means the number of owners of the value wrapped inside an Rc.

Reference count of an Rc increases by 1 whenever an Rc is cloned, and decreases by 1 whenever one cloned Rc is dropped out of the scope. When an Rc's reference count becomes zero, which means there are no owners remained, both the Rc and the value are all dropped.

Cloning an Rc never performs a deep copy. Cloning creates just another pointer to the wrapped value, and increments the count.

use std::rc::Rc;

fn main() {
    let rc_examples = "Rc examples".to_string();
    {
        println!("--- rc_a is created ---");
        
        let rc_a: Rc<String> = Rc::new(rc_examples);
        println!("Reference Count of rc_a: {}", Rc::strong_count(&rc_a));
        
        {
            println!("--- rc_a is cloned to rc_b ---");
            
            let rc_b: Rc<String> = Rc::clone(&rc_a);
            println!("Reference Count of rc_b: {}", Rc::strong_count(&rc_b));
            println!("Reference Count of rc_a: {}", Rc::strong_count(&rc_a));
            
            // Two `Rc`s are equal if their inner values are equal
            println!("rc_a and rc_b are equal: {}", rc_a.eq(&rc_b));
            
            // We can use methods of a value directly
            println!("Length of the value inside rc_a: {}", rc_a.len());
            println!("Value of rc_b: {}", rc_b);
            
            println!("--- rc_b is dropped out of scope ---");
        }
        
        println!("Reference Count of rc_a: {}", Rc::strong_count(&rc_a));
        
        println!("--- rc_a is dropped out of scope ---");
    }
    
    // Error! `rc_examples` already moved into `rc_a`
    // And when `rc_a` is dropped, `rc_examples` is dropped together
    // println!("rc_examples: {}", rc_examples);
    // TODO ^ Try uncommenting this line
}

Arc

When shared ownership between threads is needed, Arc(Atomic Reference Counted) can be used. This struct, via the Clone implementation can create a reference pointer for the location of a value in the memory heap while increasing the reference counter. As it shares ownership between threads, when the last reference pointer to a value is out of scope, the variable is dropped.


fn main() {
use std::sync::Arc;
use std::thread;

// This variable declaration is where its value is specified.
let apple = Arc::new("the same apple");

for _ in 0..10 {
    // Here there is no value specification as it is a pointer to a reference
    // in the memory heap.
    let apple = Arc::clone(&apple);

    thread::spawn(move || {
        // As Arc was used, threads can be spawned using the value allocated
        // in the Arc variable pointer's location.
        println!("{:?}", apple);
    });
}
}

Original article source at https://doc.rust-lang.org

#rust #programming #developer 

Rust  Language

Rust Language

1640144506

Strings - The Rust Programming Language

Rust For Beginners Tutorial - Strings

In this video we're taking a look at the String, &String and &str types in Rust!

Exercise solutions: https://github.com/PascalPrecht/rustlings/commits/solutions 

---
0:00 Intro
0:09 Exercise 1
4:47 Exercise 2
10:38 Outro


Strings

There are two types of strings in Rust: String and &str.

A String is stored as a vector of bytes (Vec<u8>), but guaranteed to always be a valid UTF-8 sequence. String is heap allocated, growable and not null terminated.

&str is a slice (&[u8]) that always points to a valid UTF-8 sequence, and can be used to view into a String, just like &[T] is a view into Vec<T>.

fn main() {
    // (all the type annotations are superfluous)
    // A reference to a string allocated in read only memory
    let pangram: &'static str = "the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog";
    println!("Pangram: {}", pangram);

    // Iterate over words in reverse, no new string is allocated
    println!("Words in reverse");
    for word in pangram.split_whitespace().rev() {
        println!("> {}", word);
    }

    // Copy chars into a vector, sort and remove duplicates
    let mut chars: Vec<char> = pangram.chars().collect();
    chars.sort();
    chars.dedup();

    // Create an empty and growable `String`
    let mut string = String::new();
    for c in chars {
        // Insert a char at the end of string
        string.push(c);
        // Insert a string at the end of string
        string.push_str(", ");
    }

    // The trimmed string is a slice to the original string, hence no new
    // allocation is performed
    let chars_to_trim: &[char] = &[' ', ','];
    let trimmed_str: &str = string.trim_matches(chars_to_trim);
    println!("Used characters: {}", trimmed_str);

    // Heap allocate a string
    let alice = String::from("I like dogs");
    // Allocate new memory and store the modified string there
    let bob: String = alice.replace("dog", "cat");

    println!("Alice says: {}", alice);
    println!("Bob says: {}", bob);
}

More str/String methods can be found under the std::str and std::string modules

Literals and escapes

There are multiple ways to write string literals with special characters in them. All result in a similar &str so it's best to use the form that is the most convenient to write. Similarly there are multiple ways to write byte string literals, which all result in &[u8; N].

Generally special characters are escaped with a backslash character: \. This way you can add any character to your string, even unprintable ones and ones that you don't know how to type. If you want a literal backslash, escape it with another one: \\

String or character literal delimiters occuring within a literal must be escaped: "\"", '\''.

fn main() {
    // You can use escapes to write bytes by their hexadecimal values...
    let byte_escape = "I'm writing \x52\x75\x73\x74!";
    println!("What are you doing\x3F (\\x3F means ?) {}", byte_escape);

    // ...or Unicode code points.
    let unicode_codepoint = "\u{211D}";
    let character_name = "\"DOUBLE-STRUCK CAPITAL R\"";

    println!("Unicode character {} (U+211D) is called {}",
                unicode_codepoint, character_name );


    let long_string = "String literals
                        can span multiple lines.
                        The linebreak and indentation here ->\
                        <- can be escaped too!";
    println!("{}", long_string);
}

Sometimes there are just too many characters that need to be escaped or it's just much more convenient to write a string out as-is. This is where raw string literals come into play.

fn main() {
    let raw_str = r"Escapes don't work here: \x3F \u{211D}";
    println!("{}", raw_str);

    // If you need quotes in a raw string, add a pair of #s
    let quotes = r#"And then I said: "There is no escape!""#;
    println!("{}", quotes);

    // If you need "# in your string, just use more #s in the delimiter.
    // There is no limit for the number of #s you can use.
    let longer_delimiter = r###"A string with "# in it. And even "##!"###;
    println!("{}", longer_delimiter);
}

Want a string that's not UTF-8? (Remember, str and String must be valid UTF-8). Or maybe you want an array of bytes that's mostly text? Byte strings to the rescue!

use std::str;

fn main() {
    // Note that this is not actually a `&str`
    let bytestring: &[u8; 21] = b"this is a byte string";

    // Byte arrays don't have the `Display` trait, so printing them is a bit limited
    println!("A byte string: {:?}", bytestring);

    // Byte strings can have byte escapes...
    let escaped = b"\x52\x75\x73\x74 as bytes";
    // ...but no unicode escapes
    // let escaped = b"\u{211D} is not allowed";
    println!("Some escaped bytes: {:?}", escaped);


    // Raw byte strings work just like raw strings
    let raw_bytestring = br"\u{211D} is not escaped here";
    println!("{:?}", raw_bytestring);

    // Converting a byte array to `str` can fail
    if let Ok(my_str) = str::from_utf8(raw_bytestring) {
        println!("And the same as text: '{}'", my_str);
    }

    let _quotes = br#"You can also use "fancier" formatting, \
                    like with normal raw strings"#;

    // Byte strings don't have to be UTF-8
    let shift_jis = b"\x82\xe6\x82\xa8\x82\xb1\x82\xbb"; // "ようこそ" in SHIFT-JIS

    // But then they can't always be converted to `str`
    match str::from_utf8(shift_jis) {
        Ok(my_str) => println!("Conversion successful: '{}'", my_str),
        Err(e) => println!("Conversion failed: {:?}", e),
    };
}

For conversions between character encodings check out the encoding crate.

A more detailed listing of the ways to write string literals and escape characters is given in the 'Tokens' chapter of the Rust Reference.

#rust #programming #developer 

Julie  Donnelly

Julie Donnelly

1598770012

History of Computing PtI

We learn and know (hopefully) a basic history of the world, particularly major events like the French revolution, the American Civil War, World War I, World War II (wow lots of wars), the Spaceage etc. It is important to understand the concepts of these and many other historical events. Being able to recall the start year or the exact details of how such events unfolded is one thing, but on a human level, it is more important to understand the rationale, lessons and philosophy of major events. Ultimately history teaches us what makes us innately human. Furthermore, understanding history helps us realise the how and why we operate in todayHistory provides the context for today. It makes today seem ‘obvious,’ ‘justifable’ and ‘logical’ given the previous events that unfolded.

So, following this thread of logic, understanding the history of computers should help us understand how we have got to today. A today when computers moderate much of our communication with one another. A today where computers and screens are stared at for many (and often a majority) of our waking hours (especially during Covid). A today where the thought of working, socialising or learning without a computer would be an affront and a disadvantage. Just as major events like World War II and the Cold War have greatly contributed to today’s political and social climate. I would argue computers influence just as much (if not more) of our daily lives.

Therefore it is important for us to understand the evolution of computers to understand where we may be heading in our relationship with computers.

I would like to preface that the following articles outlining the history of computers by saying this is in no way an exhaustive history of the origin of computers. Some major events have been glossed over while other meaningful contributions omitted entirely.

Whilst the thought of history for some may make the eyes automatically glisten over, I will try and make the following series as painless and exciting as possible. While I paint a story of linear progress of computation, this is hindsight bias in action. We like to create a story of history attributing certain importance to some events and not others when in reality as these events were unfolding (and continue to unfold) it was not always obvious what was a gigantic discovery. It is only now with some distance that we can appreciate past event. This means perhaps in ten years this recount will emphasis other features and neglect some of the stories today we find so foundational to computer’s creation.

With all this in mind let’s begin !!


The first computers

Since their inception computers have taken over human work by performing tedious, complex and repetitive tasks. Interestingly, t_he__ word computer initially described humans_!! Initially computers were humans (often women) who were able to perform complex mathematical computations — usually with pen and paper. Often teams would work on the same calculation independently to confirm the end results. It is interesting to note that initally when electronic computers were developed they were referred to as such — electronic computers. With time as electronic computers became more and more pervasive and powerful, it became the human computer that was deemed obsolete and inefficient. The electronic was dropped and now when we discuss computers we think of nothing else besides our gracefull and versalite electronic tools. It is important to keep computer’s mathematical origin in mind as we will see it only further emphasises the never imagined pervasiveness and uses of computers today.

Our story begins with the humble abacus, generally considered the first computer. When researching I was puzzled how an abacus could be considered a computer. Luckily my curiosity was settled by a quick Google search (thank you Google). Google was even able to suggest my search before I completed typing ‘Why is the abacus considered the first computer’! I ended up on trusty Quora where one users: Chrissie Nysen put things simply-“Because it is used to compute things.” Though estimates vary, the abacus is thought to originate in Babylon approximately 5000 years ago. The role of the abacus was to ease in simple mathematical calculations- addition, subtraction, division and multiplication. In this sense, we can consider the abacus as a simple calculator. As farming, produce and populations increased in size, the abacus allowed the educated to more easily manage logistics. After the abacus the first computer, computer’s evolution remained dormant for some time……

#history #computer-science #history-of-technology #computers #computer-history #data science