Premier League’s Return: A Hat Trick of Cyberthreats?

The beautiful game is back on the pitch in the U.K. — and cyberattackers will be looking to take advantage of fans streaming the games.

England’s Premier League is returning this week, with millions of soccer fans around the world looking to stream matches using their online video accounts. Unfortunately, the U.K.’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) is warning on phishing, fraud and brute-forcing attempts by attackers looking to break into those accounts.

The organization said in a Wednesday announcement that it expects a rash of phishing, scam and account-takeover efforts centered around the return of the country’s most popular sport — a kind of hat trick of attack types. The assessment, it said, is based on precedent: The NCSC has also observed escalating cyberattacks on television streaming subscriptions as more and more people quarantine at home during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“As well as illegally watching the game the victim has paid for, the hackers could make unauthorized purchases on the platform or look to find personal information that could be used for further scams – including targeting them with scam emails or phone calls,” the organization warned.

#cloud security #web security #premier league #soccer #security

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Premier League’s Return: A Hat Trick of Cyberthreats?
Edward Jackson

Edward Jackson

1653377002

PySpark Cheat Sheet: Spark in Python

This PySpark cheat sheet with code samples covers the basics like initializing Spark in Python, loading data, sorting, and repartitioning.

Apache Spark is generally known as a fast, general and open-source engine for big data processing, with built-in modules for streaming, SQL, machine learning and graph processing. It allows you to speed analytic applications up to 100 times faster compared to technologies on the market today. You can interface Spark with Python through "PySpark". This is the Spark Python API exposes the Spark programming model to Python. 

Even though working with Spark will remind you in many ways of working with Pandas DataFrames, you'll also see that it can be tough getting familiar with all the functions that you can use to query, transform, inspect, ... your data. What's more, if you've never worked with any other programming language or if you're new to the field, it might be hard to distinguish between RDD operations.

Let's face it, map() and flatMap() are different enough, but it might still come as a challenge to decide which one you really need when you're faced with them in your analysis. Or what about other functions, like reduce() and reduceByKey()

PySpark cheat sheet

Even though the documentation is very elaborate, it never hurts to have a cheat sheet by your side, especially when you're just getting into it.

This PySpark cheat sheet covers the basics, from initializing Spark and loading your data, to retrieving RDD information, sorting, filtering and sampling your data. But that's not all. You'll also see that topics such as repartitioning, iterating, merging, saving your data and stopping the SparkContext are included in the cheat sheet. 

Note that the examples in the document take small data sets to illustrate the effect of specific functions on your data. In real life data analysis, you'll be using Spark to analyze big data.

PySpark is the Spark Python API that exposes the Spark programming model to Python.

Initializing Spark 

SparkContext 

>>> from pyspark import SparkContext
>>> sc = SparkContext(master = 'local[2]')

Inspect SparkContext 

>>> sc.version #Retrieve SparkContext version
>>> sc.pythonVer #Retrieve Python version
>>> sc.master #Master URL to connect to
>>> str(sc.sparkHome) #Path where Spark is installed on worker nodes
>>> str(sc.sparkUser()) #Retrieve name of the Spark User running SparkContext
>>> sc.appName #Return application name
>>> sc.applicationld #Retrieve application ID
>>> sc.defaultParallelism #Return default level of parallelism
>>> sc.defaultMinPartitions #Default minimum number of partitions for RDDs

Configuration 

>>> from pyspark import SparkConf, SparkContext
>>> conf = (SparkConf()
     .setMaster("local")
     .setAppName("My app")
     . set   ("spark. executor.memory",   "lg"))
>>> sc = SparkContext(conf = conf)

Using the Shell 

In the PySpark shell, a special interpreter-aware SparkContext is already created in the variable called sc.

$ ./bin/spark-shell --master local[2]
$ ./bin/pyspark --master local[s] --py-files code.py

Set which master the context connects to with the --master argument, and add Python .zip..egg or.py files to the

runtime path by passing a comma-separated list to  --py-files.

Loading Data 

Parallelized Collections 

>>> rdd = sc.parallelize([('a',7),('a',2),('b',2)])
>>> rdd2 = sc.parallelize([('a',2),('d',1),('b',1)])
>>> rdd3 = sc.parallelize(range(100))
>>> rdd = sc.parallelize([("a",["x","y","z"]),
               ("b" ["p","r,"])])

External Data 

Read either one text file from HDFS, a local file system or any Hadoop-supported file system URI with textFile(), or read in a directory of text files with wholeTextFiles(). 

>>> textFile = sc.textFile("/my/directory/•.txt")
>>> textFile2 = sc.wholeTextFiles("/my/directory/")

Retrieving RDD Information 

Basic Information 

>>> rdd.getNumPartitions() #List the number of partitions
>>> rdd.count() #Count RDD instances 3
>>> rdd.countByKey() #Count RDD instances by key
defaultdict(<type 'int'>,{'a':2,'b':1})
>>> rdd.countByValue() #Count RDD instances by value
defaultdict(<type 'int'>,{('b',2):1,('a',2):1,('a',7):1})
>>> rdd.collectAsMap() #Return (key,value) pairs as a dictionary
   {'a': 2, 'b': 2}
>>> rdd3.sum() #Sum of RDD elements 4950
>>> sc.parallelize([]).isEmpty() #Check whether RDD is empty
True

Summary 

>>> rdd3.max() #Maximum value of RDD elements 
99
>>> rdd3.min() #Minimum value of RDD elements
0
>>> rdd3.mean() #Mean value of RDD elements 
49.5
>>> rdd3.stdev() #Standard deviation of RDD elements 
28.866070047722118
>>> rdd3.variance() #Compute variance of RDD elements 
833.25
>>> rdd3.histogram(3) #Compute histogram by bins
([0,33,66,99],[33,33,34])
>>> rdd3.stats() #Summary statistics (count, mean, stdev, max & min)

Applying Functions 

#Apply a function to each RFD element
>>> rdd.map(lambda x: x+(x[1],x[0])).collect()
[('a' ,7,7, 'a'),('a' ,2,2, 'a'), ('b' ,2,2, 'b')]
#Apply a function to each RDD element and flatten the result
>>> rdd5 = rdd.flatMap(lambda x: x+(x[1],x[0]))
>>> rdd5.collect()
['a',7 , 7 ,  'a' , 'a' , 2,  2,  'a', 'b', 2 , 2, 'b']
#Apply a flatMap function to each (key,value) pair of rdd4 without changing the keys
>>> rdds.flatMapValues(lambda x: x).collect()
[('a', 'x'), ('a', 'y'), ('a', 'z'),('b', 'p'),('b', 'r')]

Selecting Data

Getting

>>> rdd.collect() #Return a list with all RDD elements 
[('a', 7), ('a', 2), ('b', 2)]
>>> rdd.take(2) #Take first 2 RDD elements 
[('a', 7),  ('a', 2)]
>>> rdd.first() #Take first RDD element
('a', 7)
>>> rdd.top(2) #Take top 2 RDD elements 
[('b', 2), ('a', 7)]

Sampling

>>> rdd3.sample(False, 0.15, 81).collect() #Return sampled subset of rdd3
     [3,4,27,31,40,41,42,43,60,76,79,80,86,97]

Filtering

>>> rdd.filter(lambda x: "a" in x).collect() #Filter the RDD
[('a',7),('a',2)]
>>> rdd5.distinct().collect() #Return distinct RDD values
['a' ,2, 'b',7]
>>> rdd.keys().collect() #Return (key,value) RDD's keys
['a',  'a',  'b']

Iterating 

>>> def g (x): print(x)
>>> rdd.foreach(g) #Apply a function to all RDD elements
('a', 7)
('b', 2)
('a', 2)

Reshaping Data 

Reducing

>>> rdd.reduceByKey(lambda x,y : x+y).collect() #Merge the rdd values for each key
[('a',9),('b',2)]
>>> rdd.reduce(lambda a, b: a+ b) #Merge the rdd values
('a', 7, 'a' , 2 , 'b' , 2)

 

Grouping by

>>> rdd3.groupBy(lambda x: x % 2) #Return RDD of grouped values
          .mapValues(list)
          .collect()
>>> rdd.groupByKey() #Group rdd by key
          .mapValues(list)
          .collect() 
[('a',[7,2]),('b',[2])]

Aggregating

>> seqOp = (lambda x,y: (x[0]+y,x[1]+1))
>>> combOp = (lambda x,y:(x[0]+y[0],x[1]+y[1]))
#Aggregate RDD elements of each partition and then the results
>>> rdd3.aggregate((0,0),seqOp,combOp) 
(4950,100)
#Aggregate values of each RDD key
>>> rdd.aggregateByKey((0,0),seqop,combop).collect() 
     [('a',(9,2)), ('b',(2,1))]
#Aggregate the elements of each partition, and then the results
>>> rdd3.fold(0,add)
     4950
#Merge the values for each key
>>> rdd.foldByKey(0, add).collect()
[('a' ,9), ('b' ,2)]
#Create tuples of RDD elements by applying a function
>>> rdd3.keyBy(lambda x: x+x).collect()

Mathematical Operations 

>>>> rdd.subtract(rdd2).collect() #Return each rdd value not contained in rdd2
[('b' ,2), ('a' ,7)]
#Return each (key,value) pair of rdd2 with no matching key in rdd
>>> rdd2.subtractByKey(rdd).collect()
[('d', 1)1
>>>rdd.cartesian(rdd2).collect() #Return the Cartesian product of rdd and rdd2

Sort 

>>> rdd2.sortBy(lambda x: x[1]).collect() #Sort RDD by given function
[('d',1),('b',1),('a',2)]
>>> rdd2.sortByKey().collect() #Sort (key, value) ROD by key
[('a' ,2), ('b' ,1), ('d' ,1)]

Repartitioning 

>>> rdd.repartition(4) #New RDD with 4 partitions
>>> rdd.coalesce(1) #Decrease the number of partitions in the RDD to 1

Saving 

>>> rdd.saveAsTextFile("rdd.txt")
>>> rdd.saveAsHadoopFile("hdfs:// namenodehost/parent/child",
               'org.apache.hadoop.mapred.TextOutputFormat')

Stopping SparkContext 

>>> sc.stop()

Execution 

$ ./bin/spark-submit examples/src/main/python/pi.py

Have this Cheat Sheet at your fingertips

Original article source at https://www.datacamp.com

#pyspark #cheatsheet #spark #python

Callum Slater

Callum Slater

1653465344

PySpark Cheat Sheet: Spark DataFrames in Python

This PySpark SQL cheat sheet is your handy companion to Apache Spark DataFrames in Python and includes code samples.

You'll probably already know about Apache Spark, the fast, general and open-source engine for big data processing; It has built-in modules for streaming, SQL, machine learning and graph processing. Spark allows you to speed analytic applications up to 100 times faster compared to other technologies on the market today. Interfacing Spark with Python is easy with PySpark: this Spark Python API exposes the Spark programming model to Python. 

Now, it's time to tackle the Spark SQL module, which is meant for structured data processing, and the DataFrame API, which is not only available in Python, but also in Scala, Java, and R.

Without further ado, here's the cheat sheet:

PySpark SQL cheat sheet

This PySpark SQL cheat sheet covers the basics of working with the Apache Spark DataFrames in Python: from initializing the SparkSession to creating DataFrames, inspecting the data, handling duplicate values, querying, adding, updating or removing columns, grouping, filtering or sorting data. You'll also see that this cheat sheet also on how to run SQL Queries programmatically, how to save your data to parquet and JSON files, and how to stop your SparkSession.

Spark SGlL is Apache Spark's module for working with structured data.

Initializing SparkSession 
 

A SparkSession can be used create DataFrame, register DataFrame as tables, execute SGL over tables, cache tables, and read parquet files.

>>> from pyspark.sql import SparkSession
>>> spark a SparkSession \
     .builder\
     .appName("Python Spark SQL basic example") \
     .config("spark.some.config.option", "some-value") \
     .getOrCreate()

Creating DataFrames
 

Fromm RDDs

>>> from pyspark.sql.types import*

Infer Schema

>>> sc = spark.sparkContext
>>> lines = sc.textFile(''people.txt'')
>>> parts = lines.map(lambda l: l.split(","))
>>> people = parts.map(lambda p: Row(nameap[0],ageaint(p[l])))
>>> peopledf = spark.createDataFrame(people)

Specify Schema

>>> people = parts.map(lambda p: Row(name=p[0],
               age=int(p[1].strip())))
>>>  schemaString = "name age"
>>> fields = [StructField(field_name, StringType(), True) for field_name in schemaString.split()]
>>> schema = StructType(fields)
>>> spark.createDataFrame(people, schema).show()

 

From Spark Data Sources
JSON

>>>  df = spark.read.json("customer.json")
>>> df.show()

>>>  df2 = spark.read.load("people.json", format="json")

Parquet files

>>> df3 = spark.read.load("users.parquet")

TXT files

>>> df4 = spark.read.text("people.txt")

Filter 

#Filter entries of age, only keep those records of which the values are >24
>>> df.filter(df["age"]>24).show()

Duplicate Values 

>>> df = df.dropDuplicates()

Queries 
 

>>> from pyspark.sql import functions as F

Select

>>> df.select("firstName").show() #Show all entries in firstName column
>>> df.select("firstName","lastName") \
      .show()
>>> df.select("firstName", #Show all entries in firstName, age and type
              "age",
              explode("phoneNumber") \
              .alias("contactInfo")) \
      .select("contactInfo.type",
              "firstName",
              "age") \
      .show()
>>> df.select(df["firstName"],df["age"]+ 1) #Show all entries in firstName and age, .show() add 1 to the entries of age
>>> df.select(df['age'] > 24).show() #Show all entries where age >24

When

>>> df.select("firstName", #Show firstName and 0 or 1 depending on age >30
               F.when(df.age > 30, 1) \
              .otherwise(0)) \
      .show()
>>> df[df.firstName.isin("Jane","Boris")] #Show firstName if in the given options
.collect()

Like 

>>> df.select("firstName", #Show firstName, and lastName is TRUE if lastName is like Smith
              df.lastName.like("Smith")) \
     .show()

Startswith - Endswith 

>>> df.select("firstName", #Show firstName, and TRUE if lastName starts with Sm
              df.lastName \
                .startswith("Sm")) \
      .show()
>>> df.select(df.lastName.endswith("th"))\ #Show last names ending in th
      .show()

Substring 

>>> df.select(df.firstName.substr(1, 3) \ #Return substrings of firstName
                          .alias("name")) \
        .collect()

Between 

>>> df.select(df.age.between(22, 24)) \ #Show age: values are TRUE if between 22 and 24
          .show()

Add, Update & Remove Columns 

Adding Columns

 >>> df = df.withColumn('city',df.address.city) \
            .withColumn('postalCode',df.address.postalCode) \
            .withColumn('state',df.address.state) \
            .withColumn('streetAddress',df.address.streetAddress) \
            .withColumn('telePhoneNumber', explode(df.phoneNumber.number)) \
            .withColumn('telePhoneType', explode(df.phoneNumber.type)) 

Updating Columns

>>> df = df.withColumnRenamed('telePhoneNumber', 'phoneNumber')

Removing Columns

  >>> df = df.drop("address", "phoneNumber")
 >>> df = df.drop(df.address).drop(df.phoneNumber)
 

Missing & Replacing Values 
 

>>> df.na.fill(50).show() #Replace null values
 >>> df.na.drop().show() #Return new df omitting rows with null values
 >>> df.na \ #Return new df replacing one value with another
       .replace(10, 20) \
       .show()

GroupBy 

>>> df.groupBy("age")\ #Group by age, count the members in the groups
      .count() \
      .show()

Sort 
 

>>> peopledf.sort(peopledf.age.desc()).collect()
>>> df.sort("age", ascending=False).collect()
>>> df.orderBy(["age","city"],ascending=[0,1])\
     .collect()

Repartitioning 

>>> df.repartition(10)\ #df with 10 partitions
      .rdd \
      .getNumPartitions()
>>> df.coalesce(1).rdd.getNumPartitions() #df with 1 partition

Running Queries Programmatically 
 

Registering DataFrames as Views

>>> peopledf.createGlobalTempView("people")
>>> df.createTempView("customer")
>>> df.createOrReplaceTempView("customer")

Query Views

>>> df5 = spark.sql("SELECT * FROM customer").show()
>>> peopledf2 = spark.sql("SELECT * FROM global_temp.people")\
               .show()

Inspect Data 
 

>>> df.dtypes #Return df column names and data types
>>> df.show() #Display the content of df
>>> df.head() #Return first n rows
>>> df.first() #Return first row
>>> df.take(2) #Return the first n rows >>> df.schema Return the schema of df
>>> df.describe().show() #Compute summary statistics >>> df.columns Return the columns of df
>>> df.count() #Count the number of rows in df
>>> df.distinct().count() #Count the number of distinct rows in df
>>> df.printSchema() #Print the schema of df
>>> df.explain() #Print the (logical and physical) plans

Output

Data Structures 
 

 >>> rdd1 = df.rdd #Convert df into an RDD
 >>> df.toJSON().first() #Convert df into a RDD of string
 >>> df.toPandas() #Return the contents of df as Pandas DataFrame

Write & Save to Files 

>>> df.select("firstName", "city")\
       .write \
       .save("nameAndCity.parquet")
 >>> df.select("firstName", "age") \
       .write \
       .save("namesAndAges.json",format="json")

Stopping SparkSession 

>>> spark.stop()

Have this Cheat Sheet at your fingertips

Original article source at https://www.datacamp.com

#pyspark #cheatsheet #spark #dataframes #python #bigdata

Royce  Reinger

Royce Reinger

1659330128

Calculates Edit Distance using Damerau-Levenshtein Algorithm

damerau-levenshtein

The damerau-levenshtein gem allows to find edit distance between two UTF-8 or ASCII encoded strings with O(N*M) efficiency.

This gem implements pure Levenshtein algorithm, Damerau modification of it (where 2 character transposition counts as 1 edit distance). It also includes Boehmer & Rees 2008 modification of Damerau algorithm, where transposition of bigger than 1 character blocks is taken in account as well (Rees 2014).

require "damerau-levenshtein"
DamerauLevenshtein.distance("Something", "Smoething") #returns 1

It also returns a diff between two strings according to Levenshtein alrorithm. The diff is expressed by tags <ins>, <del>, and <subst>. Such tags make it possible to highlight differnce between strings in a flexible way.

require "damerau-levenshtein"
differ = DamerauLevenshtein::Differ.new
differ.run("corn", "cron")
# output: ["c<subst>or</subst>n", "c<subst>ro</subst>n"]

Dependencies

sudo apt-get install build-essential libgmp3-dev

Installation

gem install damerau-levenshtein

Examples

require "damerau-levenshtein"
dl = DamerauLevenshtein
  • compare using Damerau Levenshtein algorithm
dl.distance("Something", "Smoething") #returns 1
  • compare using Levensthein algorithm
dl.distance("Something", "Smoething", 0) #returns 2
  • compare using Boehmer & Rees modification
dl.distance("Something", "meSothing", 2) #returns 2 instead of 4
  • comparison of words with UTF-8 characters should work fine:
dl.distance("Sjöstedt", "Sjostedt") #returns 1
  • compare two arrays
dl.array_distance([1,2,3,5], [1,2,3,4]) #returns 1
  • return diff between two strings
differ = DamerauLevenshtein::Differ.new
differ.run("Something", "smthg")
  • return diff between two strings in raw format
differ = DamerauLevenshtein::Differ.new
differ.format = :raw
differ.run("Something", "smthg")

API Description

Methods

DamerauLevenshtein.version

DamerauLevenshtein.version
#returns version number of the gem

DamerauLevenshtein.distance

DamerauLevenshtein.distance(string1, string2, block_size, max_distance)
#returns edit distance between 2 strings

DamerauLevenshtein.string_distance(string1, string2, block_size, max_distance)
# an alias for .distance

DamerauLevenshtein.array_distance(array1, array2, block_size, max_distance)
# returns edit distance between 2 arrays of integers

DamerauLevenshtein.distance and .array_distance take 4 arguments:

  • string1 (array1 for .array_distance)
  • string2 (array2 for .array_distance)
  • block_size (default is 1)
  • max_distance (default is 10)

block_size determines maximum number of characters in a transposition block:

block_size = 0
(transposition does not count -- it is a pure Levenshtein algorithm)

block_size = 1
(transposition between 2 adjustent characters --
it is pure Damerau-Levenshtein algorithm)

block_size = 2
(transposition between blocks as big as 2 characters -- so abcd and cdab
counts as edit distance 2, not 4)

block_size = 3
(transposition between blocks as big as 3 characters --
so abcdef and defabc counts as edit distance 3, not 6)

etc.

max_distance -- is a threshold after which algorithm gives up and returns max_distance instead of real edit distance.

Levenshtein algorithm is expensive, so it makes sense to give up when edit distance is becoming too big. The argument max_distance does just that.


DamerauLevenshtein.distance("abcdefg", "1234567", 0, 3)
# output: 4 -- it gave up when edit distance exceeded 3

DamerauLevenshtein::Differ

differ = DamerauLevenshtein::Differ.new creates an instance of new differ class to return difference between two strings

differ.format shows current format for diff. Default is :tag format

differ.format = :raw changes current format for diffs. Possible values are :tag and :raw

differ.run("String1", "String2") returns difference between two strings.

For example:

differ = DamerauLevenshtein::Differ.new
differ.run("Something", "smthng")
# output: ["<ins>S</ins><subst>o</subst>m<ins>e</ins>th<ins>i</ins>ng",
#          "<del>S</del><subst>s</subst>m<del>e</del>th<del>i</del>ng"]

Or with parsing:

require "damerau-levenshtein"
require "nokogiri"

differ = DamerauLevenshtein::Differ.new
res = differ.run("Something", "Smothing!")
nodes = Nokogiri::XML("<root>#{res.first}</root>")

markup = nodes.root.children.map do |n|
  case n.name
  when "text"
    n.text
  when "del"
    "~~#{n.children.first.text}~~"
  when "ins"
    "*#{n.children.first.text}*"
  when "subst"
    "**#{n.children.first.text}**"
  end
end.join("")

puts markup

Output

S*o*m**e**thing~~!~~

Contributing to damerau-levenshtein

  • Check out the latest master to make sure the feature hasn't been implemented or the bug hasn't been fixed yet
  • Check out the issue tracker to make sure someone already hasn't requested it and/or contributed it
  • Fork the project
  • Start a feature/bugfix branch
  • Commit and push until you are happy with your contribution
  • Make sure to add tests for it. This is important so I don't break it in a future version unintentionally.
  • Please try not to mess with the Rakefile, version, or history. If you want to have your own version, or is otherwise necessary, that is fine, but please isolate to its own commit so I can cherry-pick around it.

Versioning

This gem is following practices of Semantic Versioning

Download Details: 

Author: GlobalNamesArchitecture
Source Code: https://github.com/GlobalNamesArchitecture/damerau-levenshtein 
License: MIT license

#ruby #algorithm 

Mike  Kozey

Mike Kozey

1656151740

Test_cov_console: Flutter Console Coverage Test

Flutter Console Coverage Test

This small dart tools is used to generate Flutter Coverage Test report to console

How to install

Add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit flutter pub get):

dev_dependencies:
  test_cov_console: ^0.2.2

How to run

run the following command to make sure all flutter library is up-to-date

flutter pub get
Running "flutter pub get" in coverage...                            0.5s

run the following command to generate lcov.info on coverage directory

flutter test --coverage
00:02 +1: All tests passed!

run the tool to generate report from lcov.info

flutter pub run test_cov_console
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File                                         |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
 print_cov_constants.dart                    |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|

Optional parameter

If not given a FILE, "coverage/lcov.info" will be used.
-f, --file=<FILE>                      The target lcov.info file to be reported
-e, --exclude=<STRING1,STRING2,...>    A list of contains string for files without unit testing
                                       to be excluded from report
-l, --line                             It will print Lines & Uncovered Lines only
                                       Branch & Functions coverage percentage will not be printed
-i, --ignore                           It will not print any file without unit testing
-m, --multi                            Report from multiple lcov.info files
-c, --csv                              Output to CSV file
-o, --output=<CSV-FILE>                Full path of output CSV file
                                       If not given, "coverage/test_cov_console.csv" will be used
-t, --total                            Print only the total coverage
                                       Note: it will ignore all other option (if any), except -m
-p, --pass=<MINIMUM>                   Print only the whether total coverage is passed MINIMUM value or not
                                       If the value >= MINIMUM, it will print PASSED, otherwise FAILED
                                       Note: it will ignore all other option (if any), except -m
-h, --help                             Show this help

example run the tool with parameters

flutter pub run test_cov_console --file=coverage/lcov.info --exclude=_constants,_mock
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File                                         |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|

report for multiple lcov.info files (-m, --multi)

It support to run for multiple lcov.info files with the followings directory structures:
1. No root module
<root>/<module_a>
<root>/<module_a>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_a>/lib/src
<root>/<module_b>
<root>/<module_b>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_b>/lib/src
...
2. With root module
<root>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/lib/src
<root>/<module_a>
<root>/<module_a>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_a>/lib/src
<root>/<module_b>
<root>/<module_b>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_b>/lib/src
...
You must run test_cov_console on <root> dir, and the report would be grouped by module, here is
the sample output for directory structure 'with root module':
flutter pub run test_cov_console --file=coverage/lcov.info --exclude=_constants,_mock --multi
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File                                         |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File - module_a -                            |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File - module_b -                            |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|

Output to CSV file (-c, --csv, -o, --output)

flutter pub run test_cov_console -c --output=coverage/test_coverage.csv

#### sample CSV output file:
File,% Branch,% Funcs,% Lines,Uncovered Line #s
lib/,,,,
test_cov_console.dart,0.00,0.00,0.00,no unit testing
lib/src/,,,,
parser.dart,100.00,100.00,97.22,"97"
parser_constants.dart,100.00,100.00,100.00,""
print_cov.dart,100.00,100.00,82.91,"29,49,51,52,171,174,177,180,183,184,185,186,187,188,279,324,325,387,388,389,390,391,392,393,394,395,398"
print_cov_constants.dart,0.00,0.00,0.00,no unit testing
All files with unit testing,100.00,100.00,86.07,""

Installing

Use this package as an executable

Install it

You can install the package from the command line:

dart pub global activate test_cov_console

Use it

The package has the following executables:

$ test_cov_console

Use this package as a library

Depend on it

Run this command:

With Dart:

 $ dart pub add test_cov_console

With Flutter:

 $ flutter pub add test_cov_console

This will add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit dart pub get):

dependencies:
  test_cov_console: ^0.2.2

Alternatively, your editor might support dart pub get or flutter pub get. Check the docs for your editor to learn more.

Import it

Now in your Dart code, you can use:

import 'package:test_cov_console/test_cov_console.dart';

example/lib/main.dart

import 'package:flutter/material.dart';

void main() {
  runApp(MyApp());
}

class MyApp extends StatelessWidget {
  // This widget is the root of your application.
  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return MaterialApp(
      title: 'Flutter Demo',
      theme: ThemeData(
        // This is the theme of your application.
        //
        // Try running your application with "flutter run". You'll see the
        // application has a blue toolbar. Then, without quitting the app, try
        // changing the primarySwatch below to Colors.green and then invoke
        // "hot reload" (press "r" in the console where you ran "flutter run",
        // or simply save your changes to "hot reload" in a Flutter IDE).
        // Notice that the counter didn't reset back to zero; the application
        // is not restarted.
        primarySwatch: Colors.blue,
        // This makes the visual density adapt to the platform that you run
        // the app on. For desktop platforms, the controls will be smaller and
        // closer together (more dense) than on mobile platforms.
        visualDensity: VisualDensity.adaptivePlatformDensity,
      ),
      home: MyHomePage(title: 'Flutter Demo Home Page'),
    );
  }
}

class MyHomePage extends StatefulWidget {
  MyHomePage({Key? key, required this.title}) : super(key: key);

  // This widget is the home page of your application. It is stateful, meaning
  // that it has a State object (defined below) that contains fields that affect
  // how it looks.

  // This class is the configuration for the state. It holds the values (in this
  // case the title) provided by the parent (in this case the App widget) and
  // used by the build method of the State. Fields in a Widget subclass are
  // always marked "final".

  final String title;

  @override
  _MyHomePageState createState() => _MyHomePageState();
}

class _MyHomePageState extends State<MyHomePage> {
  int _counter = 0;

  void _incrementCounter() {
    setState(() {
      // This call to setState tells the Flutter framework that something has
      // changed in this State, which causes it to rerun the build method below
      // so that the display can reflect the updated values. If we changed
      // _counter without calling setState(), then the build method would not be
      // called again, and so nothing would appear to happen.
      _counter++;
    });
  }

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    // This method is rerun every time setState is called, for instance as done
    // by the _incrementCounter method above.
    //
    // The Flutter framework has been optimized to make rerunning build methods
    // fast, so that you can just rebuild anything that needs updating rather
    // than having to individually change instances of widgets.
    return Scaffold(
      appBar: AppBar(
        // Here we take the value from the MyHomePage object that was created by
        // the App.build method, and use it to set our appbar title.
        title: Text(widget.title),
      ),
      body: Center(
        // Center is a layout widget. It takes a single child and positions it
        // in the middle of the parent.
        child: Column(
          // Column is also a layout widget. It takes a list of children and
          // arranges them vertically. By default, it sizes itself to fit its
          // children horizontally, and tries to be as tall as its parent.
          //
          // Invoke "debug painting" (press "p" in the console, choose the
          // "Toggle Debug Paint" action from the Flutter Inspector in Android
          // Studio, or the "Toggle Debug Paint" command in Visual Studio Code)
          // to see the wireframe for each widget.
          //
          // Column has various properties to control how it sizes itself and
          // how it positions its children. Here we use mainAxisAlignment to
          // center the children vertically; the main axis here is the vertical
          // axis because Columns are vertical (the cross axis would be
          // horizontal).
          mainAxisAlignment: MainAxisAlignment.center,
          children: <Widget>[
            Text(
              'You have pushed the button this many times:',
            ),
            Text(
              '$_counter',
              style: Theme.of(context).textTheme.headline4,
            ),
          ],
        ),
      ),
      floatingActionButton: FloatingActionButton(
        onPressed: _incrementCounter,
        tooltip: 'Increment',
        child: Icon(Icons.add),
      ), // This trailing comma makes auto-formatting nicer for build methods.
    );
  }
}

Author: DigitalKatalis
Source Code: https://github.com/DigitalKatalis/test_cov_console 
License: BSD-3-Clause license

#flutter #dart #test 

Premier League’s Return: A Hat Trick of Cyberthreats?

The beautiful game is back on the pitch in the U.K. — and cyberattackers will be looking to take advantage of fans streaming the games.

England’s Premier League is returning this week, with millions of soccer fans around the world looking to stream matches using their online video accounts. Unfortunately, the U.K.’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) is warning on phishing, fraud and brute-forcing attempts by attackers looking to break into those accounts.

The organization said in a Wednesday announcement that it expects a rash of phishing, scam and account-takeover efforts centered around the return of the country’s most popular sport — a kind of hat trick of attack types. The assessment, it said, is based on precedent: The NCSC has also observed escalating cyberattacks on television streaming subscriptions as more and more people quarantine at home during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“As well as illegally watching the game the victim has paid for, the hackers could make unauthorized purchases on the platform or look to find personal information that could be used for further scams – including targeting them with scam emails or phone calls,” the organization warned.

#cloud security #web security #premier league #soccer #security