Tia  Gottlieb

Tia Gottlieb

1611210549

How to Take a Screenshot of a Web Page using Angular Ngx Capture

Screen capture library for Angular. Define a zone and it will capture it and return a string containing a base64 PNG.

In this tutorial, we will learn how to take a screenshot of a web page using Angular. We can write our own JavaScript code to capture the screen. However, it is a time-consuming process. We have a predefined library to do this task in Angular. That is the ngx capture library. One of my clients needs to take a web application page as an image(screenshot) and send it to multiple people. I tried using plain JavaScript. It was not successful. I met many errors while doing this task. And I found the ngx capture. This saved my time. I thought to share this with you guys. It may be very helpful for someone who needs this.

So the process is very simple and straight forward.

  1. Define an HTML tag as a root element.
  2. Capture all the elements as an image inside the root element using the ngx capture library.

That’s all. No other extra work. It output a base64 png image. You can save this on your server if you want.

Let’s see how to do this in a step by step example.

#javascript #programming #web-development #angular #typescript

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How to Take a Screenshot of a Web Page using Angular Ngx Capture
Chloe  Butler

Chloe Butler

1667425440

Pdf2gerb: Perl Script Converts PDF Files to Gerber format

pdf2gerb

Perl script converts PDF files to Gerber format

Pdf2Gerb generates Gerber 274X photoplotting and Excellon drill files from PDFs of a PCB. Up to three PDFs are used: the top copper layer, the bottom copper layer (for 2-sided PCBs), and an optional silk screen layer. The PDFs can be created directly from any PDF drawing software, or a PDF print driver can be used to capture the Print output if the drawing software does not directly support output to PDF.

The general workflow is as follows:

  1. Design the PCB using your favorite CAD or drawing software.
  2. Print the top and bottom copper and top silk screen layers to a PDF file.
  3. Run Pdf2Gerb on the PDFs to create Gerber and Excellon files.
  4. Use a Gerber viewer to double-check the output against the original PCB design.
  5. Make adjustments as needed.
  6. Submit the files to a PCB manufacturer.

Please note that Pdf2Gerb does NOT perform DRC (Design Rule Checks), as these will vary according to individual PCB manufacturer conventions and capabilities. Also note that Pdf2Gerb is not perfect, so the output files must always be checked before submitting them. As of version 1.6, Pdf2Gerb supports most PCB elements, such as round and square pads, round holes, traces, SMD pads, ground planes, no-fill areas, and panelization. However, because it interprets the graphical output of a Print function, there are limitations in what it can recognize (or there may be bugs).

See docs/Pdf2Gerb.pdf for install/setup, config, usage, and other info.


pdf2gerb_cfg.pm

#Pdf2Gerb config settings:
#Put this file in same folder/directory as pdf2gerb.pl itself (global settings),
#or copy to another folder/directory with PDFs if you want PCB-specific settings.
#There is only one user of this file, so we don't need a custom package or namespace.
#NOTE: all constants defined in here will be added to main namespace.
#package pdf2gerb_cfg;

use strict; #trap undef vars (easier debug)
use warnings; #other useful info (easier debug)


##############################################################################################
#configurable settings:
#change values here instead of in main pfg2gerb.pl file

use constant WANT_COLORS => ($^O !~ m/Win/); #ANSI colors no worky on Windows? this must be set < first DebugPrint() call

#just a little warning; set realistic expectations:
#DebugPrint("${\(CYAN)}Pdf2Gerb.pl ${\(VERSION)}, $^O O/S\n${\(YELLOW)}${\(BOLD)}${\(ITALIC)}This is EXPERIMENTAL software.  \nGerber files MAY CONTAIN ERRORS.  Please CHECK them before fabrication!${\(RESET)}", 0); #if WANT_DEBUG

use constant METRIC => FALSE; #set to TRUE for metric units (only affect final numbers in output files, not internal arithmetic)
use constant APERTURE_LIMIT => 0; #34; #max #apertures to use; generate warnings if too many apertures are used (0 to not check)
use constant DRILL_FMT => '2.4'; #'2.3'; #'2.4' is the default for PCB fab; change to '2.3' for CNC

use constant WANT_DEBUG => 0; #10; #level of debug wanted; higher == more, lower == less, 0 == none
use constant GERBER_DEBUG => 0; #level of debug to include in Gerber file; DON'T USE FOR FABRICATION
use constant WANT_STREAMS => FALSE; #TRUE; #save decompressed streams to files (for debug)
use constant WANT_ALLINPUT => FALSE; #TRUE; #save entire input stream (for debug ONLY)

#DebugPrint(sprintf("${\(CYAN)}DEBUG: stdout %d, gerber %d, want streams? %d, all input? %d, O/S: $^O, Perl: $]${\(RESET)}\n", WANT_DEBUG, GERBER_DEBUG, WANT_STREAMS, WANT_ALLINPUT), 1);
#DebugPrint(sprintf("max int = %d, min int = %d\n", MAXINT, MININT), 1); 

#define standard trace and pad sizes to reduce scaling or PDF rendering errors:
#This avoids weird aperture settings and replaces them with more standardized values.
#(I'm not sure how photoplotters handle strange sizes).
#Fewer choices here gives more accurate mapping in the final Gerber files.
#units are in inches
use constant TOOL_SIZES => #add more as desired
(
#round or square pads (> 0) and drills (< 0):
    .010, -.001,  #tiny pads for SMD; dummy drill size (too small for practical use, but needed so StandardTool will use this entry)
    .031, -.014,  #used for vias
    .041, -.020,  #smallest non-filled plated hole
    .051, -.025,
    .056, -.029,  #useful for IC pins
    .070, -.033,
    .075, -.040,  #heavier leads
#    .090, -.043,  #NOTE: 600 dpi is not high enough resolution to reliably distinguish between .043" and .046", so choose 1 of the 2 here
    .100, -.046,
    .115, -.052,
    .130, -.061,
    .140, -.067,
    .150, -.079,
    .175, -.088,
    .190, -.093,
    .200, -.100,
    .220, -.110,
    .160, -.125,  #useful for mounting holes
#some additional pad sizes without holes (repeat a previous hole size if you just want the pad size):
    .090, -.040,  #want a .090 pad option, but use dummy hole size
    .065, -.040, #.065 x .065 rect pad
    .035, -.040, #.035 x .065 rect pad
#traces:
    .001,  #too thin for real traces; use only for board outlines
    .006,  #minimum real trace width; mainly used for text
    .008,  #mainly used for mid-sized text, not traces
    .010,  #minimum recommended trace width for low-current signals
    .012,
    .015,  #moderate low-voltage current
    .020,  #heavier trace for power, ground (even if a lighter one is adequate)
    .025,
    .030,  #heavy-current traces; be careful with these ones!
    .040,
    .050,
    .060,
    .080,
    .100,
    .120,
);
#Areas larger than the values below will be filled with parallel lines:
#This cuts down on the number of aperture sizes used.
#Set to 0 to always use an aperture or drill, regardless of size.
use constant { MAX_APERTURE => max((TOOL_SIZES)) + .004, MAX_DRILL => -min((TOOL_SIZES)) + .004 }; #max aperture and drill sizes (plus a little tolerance)
#DebugPrint(sprintf("using %d standard tool sizes: %s, max aper %.3f, max drill %.3f\n", scalar((TOOL_SIZES)), join(", ", (TOOL_SIZES)), MAX_APERTURE, MAX_DRILL), 1);

#NOTE: Compare the PDF to the original CAD file to check the accuracy of the PDF rendering and parsing!
#for example, the CAD software I used generated the following circles for holes:
#CAD hole size:   parsed PDF diameter:      error:
#  .014                .016                +.002
#  .020                .02267              +.00267
#  .025                .026                +.001
#  .029                .03167              +.00267
#  .033                .036                +.003
#  .040                .04267              +.00267
#This was usually ~ .002" - .003" too big compared to the hole as displayed in the CAD software.
#To compensate for PDF rendering errors (either during CAD Print function or PDF parsing logic), adjust the values below as needed.
#units are pixels; for example, a value of 2.4 at 600 dpi = .0004 inch, 2 at 600 dpi = .0033"
use constant
{
    HOLE_ADJUST => -0.004 * 600, #-2.6, #holes seemed to be slightly oversized (by .002" - .004"), so shrink them a little
    RNDPAD_ADJUST => -0.003 * 600, #-2, #-2.4, #round pads seemed to be slightly oversized, so shrink them a little
    SQRPAD_ADJUST => +0.001 * 600, #+.5, #square pads are sometimes too small by .00067, so bump them up a little
    RECTPAD_ADJUST => 0, #(pixels) rectangular pads seem to be okay? (not tested much)
    TRACE_ADJUST => 0, #(pixels) traces seemed to be okay?
    REDUCE_TOLERANCE => .001, #(inches) allow this much variation when reducing circles and rects
};

#Also, my CAD's Print function or the PDF print driver I used was a little off for circles, so define some additional adjustment values here:
#Values are added to X/Y coordinates; units are pixels; for example, a value of 1 at 600 dpi would be ~= .002 inch
use constant
{
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MINX => 0,
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MINY => -0.001 * 600, #-1, #circles were a little too high, so nudge them a little lower
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MAXX => +0.001 * 600, #+1, #circles were a little too far to the left, so nudge them a little to the right
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MAXY => 0,
    SUBST_CIRCLE_CLIPRECT => FALSE, #generate circle and substitute for clip rects (to compensate for the way some CAD software draws circles)
    WANT_CLIPRECT => TRUE, #FALSE, #AI doesn't need clip rect at all? should be on normally?
    RECT_COMPLETION => FALSE, #TRUE, #fill in 4th side of rect when 3 sides found
};

#allow .012 clearance around pads for solder mask:
#This value effectively adjusts pad sizes in the TOOL_SIZES list above (only for solder mask layers).
use constant SOLDER_MARGIN => +.012; #units are inches

#line join/cap styles:
use constant
{
    CAP_NONE => 0, #butt (none); line is exact length
    CAP_ROUND => 1, #round cap/join; line overhangs by a semi-circle at either end
    CAP_SQUARE => 2, #square cap/join; line overhangs by a half square on either end
    CAP_OVERRIDE => FALSE, #cap style overrides drawing logic
};
    
#number of elements in each shape type:
use constant
{
    RECT_SHAPELEN => 6, #x0, y0, x1, y1, count, "rect" (start, end corners)
    LINE_SHAPELEN => 6, #x0, y0, x1, y1, count, "line" (line seg)
    CURVE_SHAPELEN => 10, #xstart, ystart, x0, y0, x1, y1, xend, yend, count, "curve" (bezier 2 points)
    CIRCLE_SHAPELEN => 5, #x, y, 5, count, "circle" (center + radius)
};
#const my %SHAPELEN =
#Readonly my %SHAPELEN =>
our %SHAPELEN =
(
    rect => RECT_SHAPELEN,
    line => LINE_SHAPELEN,
    curve => CURVE_SHAPELEN,
    circle => CIRCLE_SHAPELEN,
);

#panelization:
#This will repeat the entire body the number of times indicated along the X or Y axes (files grow accordingly).
#Display elements that overhang PCB boundary can be squashed or left as-is (typically text or other silk screen markings).
#Set "overhangs" TRUE to allow overhangs, FALSE to truncate them.
#xpad and ypad allow margins to be added around outer edge of panelized PCB.
use constant PANELIZE => {'x' => 1, 'y' => 1, 'xpad' => 0, 'ypad' => 0, 'overhangs' => TRUE}; #number of times to repeat in X and Y directions

# Set this to 1 if you need TurboCAD support.
#$turboCAD = FALSE; #is this still needed as an option?

#CIRCAD pad generation uses an appropriate aperture, then moves it (stroke) "a little" - we use this to find pads and distinguish them from PCB holes. 
use constant PAD_STROKE => 0.3; #0.0005 * 600; #units are pixels
#convert very short traces to pads or holes:
use constant TRACE_MINLEN => .001; #units are inches
#use constant ALWAYS_XY => TRUE; #FALSE; #force XY even if X or Y doesn't change; NOTE: needs to be TRUE for all pads to show in FlatCAM and ViewPlot
use constant REMOVE_POLARITY => FALSE; #TRUE; #set to remove subtractive (negative) polarity; NOTE: must be FALSE for ground planes

#PDF uses "points", each point = 1/72 inch
#combined with a PDF scale factor of .12, this gives 600 dpi resolution (1/72 * .12 = 600 dpi)
use constant INCHES_PER_POINT => 1/72; #0.0138888889; #multiply point-size by this to get inches

# The precision used when computing a bezier curve. Higher numbers are more precise but slower (and generate larger files).
#$bezierPrecision = 100;
use constant BEZIER_PRECISION => 36; #100; #use const; reduced for faster rendering (mainly used for silk screen and thermal pads)

# Ground planes and silk screen or larger copper rectangles or circles are filled line-by-line using this resolution.
use constant FILL_WIDTH => .01; #fill at most 0.01 inch at a time

# The max number of characters to read into memory
use constant MAX_BYTES => 10 * M; #bumped up to 10 MB, use const

use constant DUP_DRILL1 => TRUE; #FALSE; #kludge: ViewPlot doesn't load drill files that are too small so duplicate first tool

my $runtime = time(); #Time::HiRes::gettimeofday(); #measure my execution time

print STDERR "Loaded config settings from '${\(__FILE__)}'.\n";
1; #last value must be truthful to indicate successful load


#############################################################################################
#junk/experiment:

#use Package::Constants;
#use Exporter qw(import); #https://perldoc.perl.org/Exporter.html

#my $caller = "pdf2gerb::";

#sub cfg
#{
#    my $proto = shift;
#    my $class = ref($proto) || $proto;
#    my $settings =
#    {
#        $WANT_DEBUG => 990, #10; #level of debug wanted; higher == more, lower == less, 0 == none
#    };
#    bless($settings, $class);
#    return $settings;
#}

#use constant HELLO => "hi there2"; #"main::HELLO" => "hi there";
#use constant GOODBYE => 14; #"main::GOODBYE" => 12;

#print STDERR "read cfg file\n";

#our @EXPORT_OK = Package::Constants->list(__PACKAGE__); #https://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=1072691; NOTE: "_OK" skips short/common names

#print STDERR scalar(@EXPORT_OK) . " consts exported:\n";
#foreach(@EXPORT_OK) { print STDERR "$_\n"; }
#my $val = main::thing("xyz");
#print STDERR "caller gave me $val\n";
#foreach my $arg (@ARGV) { print STDERR "arg $arg\n"; }

Download Details:

Author: swannman
Source Code: https://github.com/swannman/pdf2gerb

License: GPL-3.0 license

#perl 

Top Enterprise Angular Web Apps Development Company in USA

AppClues Infotech is one of the leading Enterprise Angular Web Apps Development Company in USA. Our dedicated & highly experienced Angular app developers build top-grade Angular apps for your business with immersive technology & superior functionalities.

For more info:
Website: https://www.appcluesinfotech.com/
Email: info@appcluesinfotech.com
Call: +1-978-309-9910

#top enterprise angular web apps development company in usa #enterprise angular web apps development #hire enterprise angular web apps developers #best enterprise angular web app services #custom enterprise angular web apps solution #professional enterprise angular web apps developers

Einar  Hintz

Einar Hintz

1593235440

Visualizing data with NGX-Charts in Angular

Data Science, Data Analytics, Big Data, these are the buzz words of today’s world. A huge amount of data is being generated and analyzed every day. So communicating the insights from that data becomes crucial. Charts help visualize the data and communicate the result of the analysis with charts, it becomes easy to understand the data.

There are a lot of libraries for angular that can be used to build charts. In this blog, we will look at one such library, NGX-Charts. We will see how to use it in angular and how to build data visualizations.

What we will cover:

  1. Installing ngx-chart.

  2. Building a vertical bar graph.

  3. Building a pie chart.

  4. Building an advanced pie chart.

A brief introduction about NGX-Charts

NGX-Chart charting framework for angular2+. It’s open-source and maintained by Swimlane.

NGX-Charts does not merely wrap d3, nor any other chart engine for that matter. It is using Angular to render and animate the SVG elements with all of its binding and speed goodness and uses d3 for the excellent math functions, scales, axis and shape generators, etc. By having Angular do all of the renderings it opens us up to endless possibilities the Angular platform provides such as AoT, Universal, etc.

NGX-Charts supports various chart types like bar charts, line charts, area charts, pie charts, bubble charts, doughnut charts, gauge charts, heatmap, treemap, and number cards.

Installation and Setup

1. Install the ngx-chart package in your angular app.

npm install @swimlane/ngx-charts --save

2. At the time of installing or when you serve your application is you get an error:

ERROR in The target entry-point "@swimlane/ngx-charts" has missing dependencies: - @angular/cdk/portal

You also need to install angular/cdk

npm install @angular/cdk --save

3. Import NgxChartsModule from ‘ngx-charts’ in AppModule

4. NgxChartModule also requires BrowserAnimationModule. Import is inAppModule.

app.module.ts

import { BrowserModule } from '@angular/platform-browser';
import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';
import { AppComponent } from './app.component';
import { NgxChartsModule }from '@swimlane/ngx-charts';
import { BrowserAnimationsModule } from '@angular/platform-browser/animations';
@NgModule({
  declarations: [
    AppComponent
  ],
  imports: [
    BrowserModule,
    BrowserAnimationsModule,
    NgxChartsModule
  ],
  providers: [],
  bootstrap: [AppComponent]
})
export class AppModule { }

Amazing! Now we can start using ngx-chart component and build the graph we want.

In the AppComponent we will provide data that the chart will represent. It’s a sample data for vehicles on the road survey.

#angular #angular 6 #scala #angular #angular 9 #bar chart #charting #charts #d3 charts #data visualisation #ngx #ngx charts #pie

Lineare Suche in Python

In diesem Python-Beitrag erfahren Sie Folgendes:

  • Was ist eine lineare Suche?
  • Linearer Suchalgorithmus
  • Schreiben Sie ein Python-Programm für die lineare Suche mit While-Schleife
  • Schreiben Sie ein Python-Programm für die lineare Suche mit der For-Schleife
  • Lineare Suche im Python-Programm mit Rekursion

Was ist eine lineare Suche?

Eine lineare Suche, auch bekannt als sequentielle Suche, diese Methode wird verwendet, um ein Element innerhalb einer Liste oder eines Arrays zu finden. Es überprüft jedes Element der Liste nacheinander / sequentiell, bis eine Übereinstimmung gefunden wird oder die gesamte Liste durchsucht wurde.

Linearer Suchalgorithmus

Implementieren Sie die lineare Suche mit den folgenden Schritten:

  • Durchlaufen Sie die Liste/das Array mit einer Schleife.
  • Verknüpfen Sie in jeder Iteration den  target Wert mit dem angegebenen Wert der Liste/des Arrays.
    • Wenn die Werte übereinstimmen, geben Sie den aktuellen Index der Liste/des Arrays zurück.
    • Fahren Sie andernfalls mit dem nächsten Array-/Listenelement fort.
  • Wenn keine Übereinstimmung gefunden wird, geben Sie zurück  -1.

Schreiben Sie ein Python-Programm für die lineare Suche mit While-Schleife

# python program for linear search using while loop

#define list
lst = []

#take input list size
num = int(input("Enter size of list :- "))

for n in range(num):
    #append element in list/array
    numbers = int(input("Enter the array of %d element :- " %n))
    lst.append(numbers)

#take input number to be find in list   
x = int(input("Enter number to search in list :- "))

i = 0
flag = False

while i < len(lst):
	if lst[i] == x:
		flag = True
		break

	i = i + 1

if flag == 1:
	print('{} was found at index {}.'.format(x, i))
else:
	print('{} was not found.'.format(x))

Nach der Ausführung des Programms lautet die Ausgabe:

Enter size of list :-  5
Enter the array of 0 element :-  10
Enter the array of 1 element :-  23
Enter the array of 2 element :-  56
Enter the array of 3 element :-  89
Enter the array of 4 element :-  200
Enter number to search in list :-  89
89 was found at index 3.

Schreiben Sie ein Python-Programm für die lineare Suche mit der For-Schleife

# python program for linear search using for loop

#define list
lst = []

#take input list size
num = int(input("Enter size of list :- "))

for n in range(num):
    #append element in list/array
    numbers = int(input("Enter the array of %d element :- " %n))
    lst.append(numbers)

#take input number to be find in list   
x = int(input("Enter number to search in list :- "))

i = 0
flag = False

for i in range(len(lst)):
    if lst[i] == x:
        flag = True
        break

if flag == 1:
	print('{} was found at index {}.'.format(x, i))
else:
	print('{} was not found.'.format(x))

Nach der Ausführung des Programms lautet die Ausgabe:

Enter size of list :-  6
Enter the array of 0 element :-  25
Enter the array of 1 element :-  50
Enter the array of 2 element :-  100
Enter the array of 3 element :-  200
Enter the array of 4 element :-  250
Enter the array of 5 element :-  650
Enter number to search in list :-  200
200 was found at index 3.

Lineare Suche im Python-Programm mit Rekursion

# python program for linear search using for loop

#define list
lst = []

#take input list size
num = int(input("Enter size of list :- "))

for n in range(num):
    #append element in list/array
    numbers = int(input("Enter the array of %d element :- " %n))
    lst.append(numbers)

#take input number to be find in list   
x = int(input("Enter number to search in list :- "))

# Recursive function to linear search x in arr[l..r]  
def recLinearSearch( arr, l, r, x): 
    if r < l: 
        return -1
    if arr[l] == x: 
        return l 
    if arr[r] == x: 
        return r 
    return recLinearSearch(arr, l+1, r-1, x) 

res = recLinearSearch(lst, 0, len(lst)-1, x) 

if res != -1:
	print('{} was found at index {}.'.format(x, res))
else:
	print('{} was not found.'.format(x))

Nach der Ausführung des Programms lautet die Ausgabe:

Enter size of list :-  5
Enter the array of 0 element :-  14
Enter the array of 1 element :-  25
Enter the array of 2 element :-  63
Enter the array of 3 element :-  42
Enter the array of 4 element :-  78
Enter number to search in list :-  78
78 was found at index 4.
藤本  結衣

藤本 結衣

1636296420

線形検索のためのPythonプログラム

このチュートリアルでは、Pythonで線形検索プログラムを作成する方法を学習します。

まず、線形検索(シーケンシャル検索とも呼ばれます)は、リストまたは配列内の要素を見つけるために使用されます。一致するものが見つかるか、リスト全体が検索されるまで、リストの各要素を1つずつ/順番にチェックします。

線形探索アルゴリズム

以下の手順に従って線形検索を実装します。

  • ループを使用してリスト/配列をトラバースします。
  • すべての反復で、target 値をリスト/配列の指定された値に関連付け ます。
    • 値が一致する場合は、リスト/配列の現在のインデックスを返します。
    • それ以外の場合は、次の配列/リスト要素に移動します。
  • 一致するものが見つからない場合は、を返し -1ます。

線形検索のためのPythonプログラム

  • whileループを使用した線形検索用のPythonプログラム
  • Forループを使用した線形検索用のPythonプログラム
  • 再帰を使用したPythonプログラムでの線形検索

whileループを使用した線形検索用のPythonプログラム

# python program for linear search using while loop
 
#define list
lst = []
 
#take input list size
num = int(input("Enter size of list :- "))
 
for n in range(num):
    #append element in list/array
    numbers = int(input("Enter the array of %d element :- " %n))
    lst.append(numbers)
 
#take input number to be find in list   
x = int(input("Enter number to search in list :- "))
 
i = 0
flag = False
 
while i < len(lst):
    if lst[i] == x:
        flag = True
        break
  
    i = i + 1
  
if flag == 1:
    print('{} was found at index {}.'.format(x, i))
else:
    print('{} was not found.'.format(x))
    

プログラムの実行後、出力は次のようになります。

Enter size of list :-  5
Enter the array of 0 element :-  10
Enter the array of 1 element :-  23
Enter the array of 2 element :-  56
Enter the array of 3 element :-  89
Enter the array of 4 element :-  200
Enter number to search in list :-  89
89 was found at index 3.

Forループを使用した線形検索用のPythonプログラム

# python program for linear search using for loop
 
#define list
lst = []
 
#take input list size
num = int(input("Enter size of list :- "))
 
for n in range(num):
    #append element in list/array
    numbers = int(input("Enter the array of %d element :- " %n))
    lst.append(numbers)
 
#take input number to be find in list   
x = int(input("Enter number to search in list :- "))
 
i = 0
flag = False
 
for i in range(len(lst)):
    if lst[i] == x:
        flag = True
        break
  
if flag == 1:
    print('{} was found at index {}.'.format(x, i))
else:
    print('{} was not found.'.format(x))
    

プログラムの実行後、出力は次のようになります。

Enter size of list :-  6
Enter the array of 0 element :-  25
Enter the array of 1 element :-  50
Enter the array of 2 element :-  100
Enter the array of 3 element :-  200
Enter the array of 4 element :-  250
Enter the array of 5 element :-  650
Enter number to search in list :-  200
200 was found at index 3.

再帰を使用したPythonプログラムでの線形検索

# python program for linear search using for loop
 
#define list
lst = []
 
#take input list size
num = int(input("Enter size of list :- "))
 
for n in range(num):
    #append element in list/array
    numbers = int(input("Enter the array of %d element :- " %n))
    lst.append(numbers)
 
#take input number to be find in list   
x = int(input("Enter number to search in list :- "))
 
# Recursive function to linear search x in arr[l..r]  
def recLinearSearch( arr, l, r, x): 
    if r < l: 
        return -1
    if arr[l] == x: 
        return l 
    if arr[r] == x: 
        return r 
    return recLinearSearch(arr, l+1, r-1, x) 
     
 
res = recLinearSearch(lst, 0, len(lst)-1, x) 
  
if res != -1:
    print('{} was found at index {}.'.format(x, res))
else:
    print('{} was not found.'.format(x))
    

プログラムの実行後、出力は次のようになります。

Enter size of list :-  5
Enter the array of 0 element :-  14
Enter the array of 1 element :-  25
Enter the array of 2 element :-  63
Enter the array of 3 element :-  42
Enter the array of 4 element :-  78
Enter number to search in list :-  78
78 was found at index 4.

リンク: https://www.tutsmake.com/linear-search-in-python/

#python