The Rust Programming Language - Understanding Loops in Rust

Rust currently provides three approaches to performing some kind of iterative activity. They are: loop, while and for. Each approach has its own set of uses.

loop

The infinite loop is the simplest form of loop available in Rust. Using the keyword loop, Rust provides a way to loop indefinitely until some terminating statement is reached. Rust’s infinite loops look like this:

loop {
    println!("Loop forever!");
}

while

Rust also has a while loop. It looks like this:


# #![allow(unused_variables)]
#fn main() {
let mut x = 5; // mut x: i32
let mut done = false; // mut done: bool

while !done {
    x += x - 3;

    println!("{}", x);

    if x % 5 == 0 {
        done = true;
    }
}
#}

while loops are the correct choice when you’re not sure how many times you need to loop.

If you need an infinite loop, you may be tempted to write this:

while true {

However, loop is far better suited to handle this case:

loop {

Rust’s control-flow analysis treats this construct differently than a while true, since we know that it will always loop. In general, the more information we can give to the compiler, the better it can do with safety and code generation, so you should always prefer loop when you plan to loop infinitely.

for

The for loop is used to loop a particular number of times. Rust’s for loops work a bit differently than in other systems languages, however. Rust’s for loop doesn’t look like this “C-style” for loop:

for (x = 0; x < 10; x++) {
    printf( "%d\n", x );
}

Instead, it looks like this:


# #![allow(unused_variables)]
#fn main() {
for x in 0..10 {
    println!("{}", x); // x: i32
}
#}

In slightly more abstract terms,

for var in expression {
    code
}

The expression is an item that can be converted into an iterator using IntoIterator. The iterator gives back a series of elements, one element per iteration of the loop. That value is then bound to the name var, which is valid for the loop body. Once the body is over, the next value is fetched from the iterator, and we loop another time. When there are no more values, the for loop is over.

In our example, 0..10 is an expression that takes a start and an end position, and gives an iterator over those values. The upper bound is exclusive, though, so our loop will print 0 through 9, not 10.

Rust does not have the “C-style” for loop on purpose. Manually controlling each element of the loop is complicated and error prone, even for experienced C developers.

Enumerate

When you need to keep track of how many times you have already looped, you can use the .enumerate() function.

On ranges:


# #![allow(unused_variables)]
#fn main() {
for (index, value) in (5..10).enumerate() {
    println!("index = {} and value = {}", index, value);
}
#}

Outputs:

index = 0 and value = 5
index = 1 and value = 6
index = 2 and value = 7
index = 3 and value = 8
index = 4 and value = 9

Don’t forget to add the parentheses around the range.

On iterators:


# #![allow(unused_variables)]
#fn main() {
let lines = "hello\nworld".lines();

for (linenumber, line) in lines.enumerate() {
    println!("{}: {}", linenumber, line);
}
#}

Outputs:

0: hello
1: world

Ending iteration early

Let’s take a look at that while loop we had earlier:


# #![allow(unused_variables)]
#fn main() {
let mut x = 5;
let mut done = false;

while !done {
    x += x - 3;

    println!("{}", x);

    if x % 5 == 0 {
        done = true;
    }
}
#}

We had to keep a dedicated mut boolean variable binding, done, to know when we should exit out of the loop. Rust has two keywords to help us with modifying iteration: break and continue.

In this case, we can write the loop in a better way with break:


# #![allow(unused_variables)]
#fn main() {
let mut x = 5;

loop {
    x += x - 3;

    println!("{}", x);

    if x % 5 == 0 { break; }
}
#}

We now loop forever with loop and use break to break out early. Issuing an explicit return statement will also serve to terminate the loop early.

continue is similar, but instead of ending the loop, it goes to the next iteration. This will only print the odd numbers:


# #![allow(unused_variables)]
#fn main() {
for x in 0..10 {
    if x % 2 == 0 { continue; }

    println!("{}", x);
}
#}

Loop labels

You may also encounter situations where you have nested loops and need to specify which one your break or continue statement is for. Like most other languages, Rust’s break or continue apply to the innermost loop. In a situation where you would like to break or continue for one of the outer loops, you can use labels to specify which loop the break or continue statement applies to.

In the example below, we continue to the next iteration of outer loop when x is even, while we continue to the next iteration of inner loop when y is even. So it will execute the println! when both x and y are odd.


# #![allow(unused_variables)]
#fn main() {
'outer: for x in 0..10 {
    'inner: for y in 0..10 {
        if x % 2 == 0 { continue 'outer; } // Continues the loop over `x`.
        if y % 2 == 0 { continue 'inner; } // Continues the loop over `y`.
        println!("x: {}, y: {}", x, y);
    }
}
#}

#Rust #Programming #WebDev #JavaScript

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The Rust Programming Language - Understanding Loops in Rust

RUST on programming language

The title is a bit confusing to understand the context of the content. In this blog, I am going to run around and see the different aspects of programming language rust. And talk about the concepts that it introduces that are useful for various aspects of programming.

What is Rust?

Simply putting it is a statically as well as strongly typed programming language.

Let me explain:

_statically typed _indicates that all the datatypes that are expressed in the code are known at compile time and memory allocation is done properly.

Image for post

Then what is 👆 that? Let’s just say rust knows what you want to say.

But this doesn’t mean you could declare variables for a complex data type and expect rust to understand. Here comes the next point I mentioned above.

_strongly typed _indicates that the types are designed to make it harder to write syntatically incorrect code.

If you were to do even a little mistake with the syntax or definition of variables then the errors are caught at compile time. Not just the syntax errors but there are various tests build in the compiler to check for unused variablesdead code(Code that will never run), infinite loops as well as the lifetime of variables.

#security #programming #programming-languages #rust

The Rust Programming Language - Understanding Loops in Rust

Rust currently provides three approaches to performing some kind of iterative activity. They are: loop, while and for. Each approach has its own set of uses.

loop

The infinite loop is the simplest form of loop available in Rust. Using the keyword loop, Rust provides a way to loop indefinitely until some terminating statement is reached. Rust’s infinite loops look like this:

loop {
    println!("Loop forever!");
}

while

Rust also has a while loop. It looks like this:


# #![allow(unused_variables)]
#fn main() {
let mut x = 5; // mut x: i32
let mut done = false; // mut done: bool

while !done {
    x += x - 3;

    println!("{}", x);

    if x % 5 == 0 {
        done = true;
    }
}
#}

while loops are the correct choice when you’re not sure how many times you need to loop.

If you need an infinite loop, you may be tempted to write this:

while true {

However, loop is far better suited to handle this case:

loop {

Rust’s control-flow analysis treats this construct differently than a while true, since we know that it will always loop. In general, the more information we can give to the compiler, the better it can do with safety and code generation, so you should always prefer loop when you plan to loop infinitely.

for

The for loop is used to loop a particular number of times. Rust’s for loops work a bit differently than in other systems languages, however. Rust’s for loop doesn’t look like this “C-style” for loop:

for (x = 0; x < 10; x++) {
    printf( "%d\n", x );
}

Instead, it looks like this:


# #![allow(unused_variables)]
#fn main() {
for x in 0..10 {
    println!("{}", x); // x: i32
}
#}

In slightly more abstract terms,

for var in expression {
    code
}

The expression is an item that can be converted into an iterator using IntoIterator. The iterator gives back a series of elements, one element per iteration of the loop. That value is then bound to the name var, which is valid for the loop body. Once the body is over, the next value is fetched from the iterator, and we loop another time. When there are no more values, the for loop is over.

In our example, 0..10 is an expression that takes a start and an end position, and gives an iterator over those values. The upper bound is exclusive, though, so our loop will print 0 through 9, not 10.

Rust does not have the “C-style” for loop on purpose. Manually controlling each element of the loop is complicated and error prone, even for experienced C developers.

Enumerate

When you need to keep track of how many times you have already looped, you can use the .enumerate() function.

On ranges:


# #![allow(unused_variables)]
#fn main() {
for (index, value) in (5..10).enumerate() {
    println!("index = {} and value = {}", index, value);
}
#}

Outputs:

index = 0 and value = 5
index = 1 and value = 6
index = 2 and value = 7
index = 3 and value = 8
index = 4 and value = 9

Don’t forget to add the parentheses around the range.

On iterators:


# #![allow(unused_variables)]
#fn main() {
let lines = "hello\nworld".lines();

for (linenumber, line) in lines.enumerate() {
    println!("{}: {}", linenumber, line);
}
#}

Outputs:

0: hello
1: world

Ending iteration early

Let’s take a look at that while loop we had earlier:


# #![allow(unused_variables)]
#fn main() {
let mut x = 5;
let mut done = false;

while !done {
    x += x - 3;

    println!("{}", x);

    if x % 5 == 0 {
        done = true;
    }
}
#}

We had to keep a dedicated mut boolean variable binding, done, to know when we should exit out of the loop. Rust has two keywords to help us with modifying iteration: break and continue.

In this case, we can write the loop in a better way with break:


# #![allow(unused_variables)]
#fn main() {
let mut x = 5;

loop {
    x += x - 3;

    println!("{}", x);

    if x % 5 == 0 { break; }
}
#}

We now loop forever with loop and use break to break out early. Issuing an explicit return statement will also serve to terminate the loop early.

continue is similar, but instead of ending the loop, it goes to the next iteration. This will only print the odd numbers:


# #![allow(unused_variables)]
#fn main() {
for x in 0..10 {
    if x % 2 == 0 { continue; }

    println!("{}", x);
}
#}

Loop labels

You may also encounter situations where you have nested loops and need to specify which one your break or continue statement is for. Like most other languages, Rust’s break or continue apply to the innermost loop. In a situation where you would like to break or continue for one of the outer loops, you can use labels to specify which loop the break or continue statement applies to.

In the example below, we continue to the next iteration of outer loop when x is even, while we continue to the next iteration of inner loop when y is even. So it will execute the println! when both x and y are odd.


# #![allow(unused_variables)]
#fn main() {
'outer: for x in 0..10 {
    'inner: for y in 0..10 {
        if x % 2 == 0 { continue 'outer; } // Continues the loop over `x`.
        if y % 2 == 0 { continue 'inner; } // Continues the loop over `y`.
        println!("x: {}, y: {}", x, y);
    }
}
#}

#Rust #Programming #WebDev #JavaScript

Cayla  Erdman

Cayla Erdman

1594369800

Introduction to Structured Query Language SQL pdf

SQL stands for Structured Query Language. SQL is a scripting language expected to store, control, and inquiry information put away in social databases. The main manifestation of SQL showed up in 1974, when a gathering in IBM built up the principal model of a social database. The primary business social database was discharged by Relational Software later turning out to be Oracle.

Models for SQL exist. In any case, the SQL that can be utilized on every last one of the major RDBMS today is in various flavors. This is because of two reasons:

1. The SQL order standard is genuinely intricate, and it isn’t handy to actualize the whole standard.

2. Every database seller needs an approach to separate its item from others.

Right now, contrasts are noted where fitting.

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Biju Augustian

Biju Augustian

1574340419

Guide to Python Programming Language

Description
The course will lead you from beginning level to advance in Python Programming Language. You do not need any prior knowledge on Python or any programming language or even programming to join the course and become an expert on the topic.

The course is begin continuously developing by adding lectures regularly.

Please see the Promo and free sample video to get to know more.

Hope you will enjoy it.

Basic knowledge
An Enthusiast Mind
A Computer
Basic Knowledge To Use Computer
Internet Connection
What will you learn
Will Be Expert On Python Programming Language
Build Application On Python Programming Language

#uide to Python #Guide to Python Programming #Guide to Python Programming Language #Python Programming #Python Programming Language

Alayna  Rippin

Alayna Rippin

1600898400

OS in Rust: An executable that runs on bare metal

This is the very first blog of the series that pertains to create a basic Operating System using Rust Programming Language.

The aim of this series is to learn and understand the basics of Operating System. Through this series, you will get some ideas about the internal components of Operating System and how they interact with each other.

In this article, we will create a freestanding binary (an executable) that has the capability to run on bare metal. To create that executable we need to follow certain steps:

Steps to create a bare-metal executable:

  • Disable standard library
  • Define custom panic handler
  • Provide language items
  • Provide entry point
  • Build executable

#functional programming #rust #rust programming language #system programming