Creating your first npm package

Creating your first npm package

Publishing NPM Package. It is now time to publish our project to npm so that anyone can use it. If this is your first time publishing a package open up a terminal in the wrap-with-poo directory and type the following command. This will ask you for your npm account information such as username, password, and email.

Publishing NPM Package. It is now time to publish our project to npm so that anyone can use it. If this is your first time publishing a package open up a terminal in the wrap-with-poo directory and type the following command. This will ask you for your npm account information such as username, password, and email.

This weekend I started working on my first ever npm package. I can’t believe for how long I have been writing code that I never bothered to create my own npm package but here we are. I built my newest site using Gridsome and markdown and you can read all about that here. In the markdown files, I wanted an easy way to insert a twitter status and embed the tweet.

I will tell you more about that Gridsome plugin in a future blog post but for now, I want to show you how you can create your very first npm package. I learned a few things while working on this and I would like to share them with you.

Prerequisites

I am going to assume you at least know what node & npm is and have written JavaScript before. If you don’t know either of these and want me to write something up on getting started with those please let me know.

There are a few things that you’re going to need before we dive in and start writing some code.

Creating your npm package

The first thing you are going to do is create a new folder to hold your npm package. For this example, I am going to create a new directory called wrap-with-poo. Yes, you read that correctly.

Go into that folder and type the following:

npm init


This will ask you a bunch of questions and then create a package.json. If you don’t know answers to certain questions just yet don’t worry, you can come back and answer them later.

This utility will walk you through creating a package.json file.
It only covers the most common items and tries to guess sensible defaults.

See `npm help json` for definitive documentation on these fields
and exactly what they do.

Use `npm install <pkg>` afterward to install a package and
save it as a dependency in the package.json file.

Press ^C at any time to quit.
package name: (wrap-with-poop)
version: (1.0.0) 0.0.1
description: This package will take any string you give it and wrap it with the poop emjoi
entry point: (index.js)
test command:
git repository:
keywords: node,npm
author: Dan Vega
license: (ISC) MIT
About to write to /Users/vega/dev/npm/wrap-with-poop/package.json:

{
  "name": "wrap-with-poop",
  "version": "0.0.1",
  "description": "This package will take any string you give it and wrap it with the poop emjoi",
  "main": "index.js",
  "scripts": {
    "test": "echo \"Error: no test specified\" && exit 1"
  },
  "keywords": [
    "node",
    "npm"
  ],
  "author": "Dan Vega",
  "license": "MIT"
}

Is this OK? (yes) yes


Writing your plugin

Next open this project up in Visual Studio Code and create index.js. The reason you’re creating this file is that in your package.json you said that this was your entry point. In your index.js add the following code:

module.exports = (str) => {
    return `💩${str}💩`;
}


The module.exports object allows us to organize some related code and then expose it as a module. This means that when we are done we could import this module into another application. In this case, we are assigning an arrow function which means we are exposing a single function that takes an argument called str and returns that string wrapped with the poo emoji. That is all you need to do with this project. It is a pretty simple package but it will help walk through a few things.

npm local development

Now that you have our package ready to go you need to test it in another project. In the real world, you should be writing some unit tests against it but I want to save that for another article & screencast.

Next, create a new directory (outside of your package) called wrap-with-poo-testing. You will again need to run npm init but this time you can add the -y argument to skip all of the questions, they are less important this time.

npm init -y

Wrote to /Users/vega/dev/npm/wrap-with-poo/package.json:

{
  "name": "wrap-with-poop",
  "version": "1.0.0",
  "description": "",
  "main": "index.js",
  "scripts": {
    "test": "echo \"Error: no test specified\" && exit 1"
  },
  "keywords": [],
  "author": "",
  "license": "ISC"
}


NPM Install

In this project create a new file called app.js. This is where you are going to use your new wrap-with-poo package. This is normally where you would normally install the npm package you needed by running the following command.

npm install wrap-with-poo


The problem with this is that you haven’t published your new plugin yet so it isn’t in npm. You need a way to reference the package locally while you’re developing it. You could run npm install with the absolute path to the package.

npm install /Users/vega/dev/npm/wrap-with-poo


Which would update your package.json to look like this

{
  "name": "npm",
  "version": "1.0.0",
  "description": "",
  "main": "index.js",
  "scripts": {
    "test": "echo \"Error: no test specified\" && exit 1"
  },
  "keywords": [],
  "author": "",
  "license": "ISC",
  "dependencies": {
    "wrap-with-poo": "file:../wrap-with-poo"
  }
}


If you need to test out pre-install/post-install hooks in your package then you will want to use this approach. If you don’t care about the best way to develop NPM projects locally is by using npm link.

NPM Link

npm link is a process that allows you to create a symbolic link between your project and the dependency. First, you need to move into the directory wrap-with-poo and run the following command.

npm link


This will take your package and create a symbolic link in the npm global folder to it.

/Users/vega/.nvm/versions/node/v10.15.0/lib/node_modules/wrap-with-poo -> /Users/vega/dev/npm/wrap-with-poo

This means that your project can be used in any project with one more simple step. The next thing you need to do is to move into the project wrap-with-poo-testing and run the following command.

npm link wrap-with-poo


This will output the following: /Users/vega/dev/npm/wrap-with-poo-testing/node_modules/wrap-with-poo -> /Users/vega/.nvm/versions/node/v10.15.0/lib/node_modules/wra

** p-with-poo -> /Users/vega/dev/npm/wrap-with-poo**

That is all there is to it, no need to install the dependency. You are ready to begin writing some code to play with you new plugin. Open up the app.js and add the following code.

const poo = require('wrap-with-poo');
const boring = 'This is a boring string';
const fun = poo(boring);

console.log(fun);


And run the following command from the integrated terminal

node app.js


And you will get the following output

💩This is a boring string💩


Publish Source Code

Now that we know our project works its time to make it public for everyone to use. If you haven’t done so yet I would add your project to Github or whatever source code hosting you prefer.

git init
git add .
git commit -m "Initial commit"
git remote add origin https://github.com/cfaddict/wrap-with-poo.git
git push -u origin master


Now that it is on Github go back and add an entry to your package.json so everyone knows where to find the source code using the homepage key.

{
  "name": "wrap-with-poo",
  "version": "0.0.1",
  "description": "This package will wrap any string you give it with the poop emoji",
  "main": "index.js",
  "scripts": {
    "test": "echo \"Error: no test specified\" && exit 1"
  },
  "keywords": [
    "node",
    "npm",
    "poop"
  ],
  "author": "Dan Vega",
  "license": "MIT",
  "homepage": "https://github.com/cfaddict/wrap-with-poo"
}


Publishing NPM Package

It is now time to publish our project to npm so that anyone can use it. If this is your first time publishing a package open up a terminal in the wrap-with-poo directory and type the following command.

npm adduser


This will ask you for your npm account information such as username, password, and email.

vega wrap-with-poo (master) $ npm adduser
Username: therealdanvega
Password:
Email: (this IS public) [email protected]
Logged in as therealdanvega on https://registry.npmjs.org/.


Now you’re ready to publish but there are a couple of things you need to remember. First every npm package must have a unique name. I would head over to npm and do a quick search for your package. I have already published the package wrap-with-poo so yours will need a new unique name.

The next thing you need to know is that your version number matters. I start with 0.0.1 and work my way up from there. Once you publish a specific version you can’t publish the same version again. It is a good idea to build a number of features into a version and then publish that. If you run

npm version


It will tell you what your current version is.

{ 'wrap-with-poo': '0.0.1',
  npm: '6.7.0',
  ares: '1.15.0',
  cldr: '33.1',
  http_parser: '2.8.0',
  icu: '62.1',
  modules: '64',
  napi: '3',
  nghttp2: '1.34.0',
  node: '10.15.0',
  openssl: '1.1.0j',
  tz: '2018e',
  unicode: '11.0',
  uv: '1.23.2',
  v8: '6.8.275.32-node.45',
  zlib: '1.2.11' }


If everything looks good you can publish your new project by running

npm publish


This might take a few seconds but if everything went ok your package should now be live on npm.

Congrats on publishing your first npm package!!!

Now you can go into any project that already has a package.json and type the following

npm install wrap-with-poo


And use it just like we did in our testing example above.

Documentation

I know some people say that you should create documentation from the beginning but I am not always sure what my code is going to end up looking like so I usually wait on this. Create a README.md in the root of your project and add some information about your project.

Conclusion

As I said at the beginning of this article I can’t believe I published my first npm package this weekend. I just never really had a need to do so until now but I was really excited to learn how easy it was. If this is your first npm package please leave me some comments or tweet at me when yours is live!

Happy Coding!

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Top 7 Most Popular Node.js Frameworks You Should Know

Top 7 Most Popular Node.js Frameworks You Should Know

Node.js is an open-source, cross-platform, runtime environment that allows developers to run JavaScript outside of a browser. In this post, you'll see top 7 of the most popular Node frameworks at this point in time (ranked from high to low by GitHub stars).

Node.js is an open-source, cross-platform, runtime environment that allows developers to run JavaScript outside of a browser.

One of the main advantages of Node is that it enables developers to use JavaScript on both the front-end and the back-end of an application. This not only makes the source code of any app cleaner and more consistent, but it significantly speeds up app development too, as developers only need to use one language.

Node is fast, scalable, and easy to get started with. Its default package manager is npm, which means it also sports the largest ecosystem of open-source libraries. Node is used by companies such as NASA, Uber, Netflix, and Walmart.

But Node doesn't come alone. It comes with a plethora of frameworks. A Node framework can be pictured as the external scaffolding that you can build your app in. These frameworks are built on top of Node and extend the technology's functionality, mostly by making apps easier to prototype and develop, while also making them faster and more scalable.

Below are 7of the most popular Node frameworks at this point in time (ranked from high to low by GitHub stars).

Express

With over 43,000 GitHub stars, Express is the most popular Node framework. It brands itself as a fast, unopinionated, and minimalist framework. Express acts as middleware: it helps set up and configure routes to send and receive requests between the front-end and the database of an app.

Express provides lightweight, powerful tools for HTTP servers. It's a great framework for single-page apps, websites, hybrids, or public HTTP APIs. It supports over fourteen different template engines, so developers aren't forced into any specific ORM.

Meteor

Meteor is a full-stack JavaScript platform. It allows developers to build real-time web apps, i.e. apps where code changes are pushed to all browsers and devices in real-time. Additionally, servers send data over the wire, instead of HTML. The client renders the data.

The project has over 41,000 GitHub stars and is built to power large projects. Meteor is used by companies such as Mazda, Honeywell, Qualcomm, and IKEA. It has excellent documentation and a strong community behind it.

Koa

Koa is built by the same team that built Express. It uses ES6 methods that allow developers to work without callbacks. Developers also have more control over error-handling. Koa has no middleware within its core, which means that developers have more control over configuration, but which means that traditional Node middleware (e.g. req, res, next) won't work with Koa.

Koa already has over 26,000 GitHub stars. The Express developers built Koa because they wanted a lighter framework that was more expressive and more robust than Express. You can find out more about the differences between Koa and Express here.

Sails

Sails is a real-time, MVC framework for Node that's built on Express. It supports auto-generated REST APIs and comes with an easy WebSocket integration.

The project has over 20,000 stars on GitHub and is compatible with almost all databases (MySQL, MongoDB, PostgreSQL, Redis). It's also compatible with most front-end technologies (Angular, iOS, Android, React, and even Windows Phone).

Nest

Nest has over 15,000 GitHub stars. It uses progressive JavaScript and is built with TypeScript, which means it comes with strong typing. It combines elements of object-oriented programming, functional programming, and functional reactive programming.

Nest is packaged in such a way it serves as a complete development kit for writing enterprise-level apps. The framework uses Express, but is compatible with a wide range of other libraries.

LoopBack

LoopBack is a framework that allows developers to quickly create REST APIs. It has an easy-to-use CLI wizard and allows developers to create models either on their schema or dynamically. It also has a built-in API explorer.

LoopBack has over 12,000 GitHub stars and is used by companies such as GoDaddy, Symantec, and the Bank of America. It's compatible with many REST services and a wide variety of databases (MongoDB, Oracle, MySQL, PostgreSQL).

Hapi

Similar to Express, hapi serves data by intermediating between server-side and client-side. As such, it's can serve as a substitute for Express. Hapi allows developers to focus on writing reusable app logic in a modular and prescriptive fashion.

The project has over 11,000 GitHub stars. It has built-in support for input validation, caching, authentication, and more. Hapi was originally developed to handle all of Walmart's mobile traffic during Black Friday.

How to Install Node.js with npm on Debian 10

How to Install Node.js with npm on Debian 10

Install Node.js with npm on Debian 10 In this tutorial, we are going to learn how to install Node.js with npm on Debian 10

Table of Contents

Install Node.js with npm on Debian 10

In this tutorial, we are going to learn how to install Node.js with npm on Debian 10. Node.js is the opensource JavaScript Run-time environment for server-side execution of JavaScript code. Node.js built on Chrome’s V8 JavaScript engine so it can be used to build different types of server-side applications.

Where npm stands for Node Package Manager which is the default package manager for Node.js. npm is the world’s largest software registry for Node.js packages with thousands of packages available.

In this tutorial we will install Node.js in following two ways:

  1. Install Node.js and npm using Debian repository
  2. Install Node.js and npm using nvm
  3. Install Node.js from the NodeSource repository.

1. Install Node.js and npm using Debian repository

First, Update Debian apt package manager index by running the following command.

sudo apt update

Install Node.js from Debian global repository by typing

sudo apt install node

Confirm the installation of Node.js by typing

node --version

Install npm by running following command

sudo apt install npm

Confirm the installation of npm by typing

npm --version

2. Install Node.js and npm using nvm

NVM stands for Node Version Manager which is used to manage multiple Node.js versions. If you want to install or uninstall different versions of Node.js then NVM is there for you.

First, we will install NVM (Node Package Manager) on your system. So download the NVM installation script running the following command.

curl -o- https://raw.githubusercontent.com/creationix/nvm/v0.33.11/install.sh | bash

Check nvm version and confirm installation typing

node --version

Now install Node.js by using the following command.

nvm install node

Verify Node.js installation by typing

node --version

The output should be:

Output

v10.14.0

You can install multiple versions of Node.js. To do so type the following:

nvm install 8.14
nvm install --lts
nvm install 11.3

To list all the versions installed run following command.

nvm ls

You can change the current default version of Node.js by using the following command.

nvm use 8.14

To uninstall a Node.js version type following command

nvm uninstall 11.14

Install Node.js from NodeSource Repository

NodeSource company provides enterprise-grade node support also maintains the repository containing the latest version of Node.js.

To enable the NodeSource repository on your system run following command.

curl -sL https://deb.nodesource.com/setup_10.x | sudo bash -

NOTE: The latest LTS version of Node.js is 10.x if you want to install 8.x version then just replace setup_10.x with setup_8.x

Now install Node.js and npm package typing.

sudo apt install nodejs

Verify installation of Node.js and npm running following command

node --version
npm --version

Install Development Tools

Now install some packages needed for development by running following command

sudo apt install gcc g++ make

Uninstall Node.js and npm

Uninstall Node.js use following command

sudo apt remove nodejs npm
sudo apt autoremove

To uninstall node.js version using nvm type following command

nvm uninstall 10.14

Conclusion

You have successfully learned how to install Node.js with npm on Debian 10. If you have any queries don’t forget to comment below.

Hire Node JS Developer from Expert Node JS Development Company

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