Justyn  Ortiz

Justyn Ortiz

1598464800

Building an Excel Football League Table — Traditional Methods vs Dynamic Arrays

Image for post

Introduction

I

am going to show you the different ways you can build a football league table in Excel. Some of the methods are old school but others utilise Excel’s new capabilities.

In case you weren’t already aware, Excel has undergone a big change to its calculation engine fairly recently. The concept of dynamic arrays was first introduced back in September 2018, however, for many Microsoft 365 users the first batch of new functions took an awfully long time to appear. Unless you have been an Office Insider, you will not have been able to use them. Even though the update was rolled out to my copy towards the start of the year, there were still swathes of users who were kept waiting.

Since dynamic arrays were introduced in Excel, array formulas no long require you to press Ctrl + Shift + Return every time you edit a cell. This was an annoying practice that made many users, including myself, reluctant to use arrays. They just didn’t feel like a native and integrated part of Excel. Now you can use an array formula like any other — without that additional step.

If you want to find out more about the new functions, I recommend you visit Microsoft’s help page for each one: XLOOKUPFILTERUNIQUESORTBYSORTSEQUENCERANDARRAY.


Before we start

Download the workbook from here: https://bit.ly/39mlqkp.

Quick caveat: if you have an older version of Excel, you will find some of the examples do not work because of compatibility issues. This is unavoidable unless you purchase a Microsoft 365 subscription. Personally, I would recommend you do so.

Steps taken

Firstly, a dataset is required containing a list of all the matches played and their respective results. I have used English Premier League data from the 2019/20 season for this example. To conserve space elsewhere, the matches are stored in a separate worksheet called Data — with the table itself named DataTable.

Image for post

2019/20 Premier League Dataset

You’ll notice there’s a calculated column on the end called Result. This formula looks at the home_goal and away_goal fields for each match played and determines whether the outcome was a home win (H), draw (D) or away win (A).

There are three sections: Part APart B and Part C. Each contains multiple league tables that output identical values, but the method used differs.

Any kind of system that involves ranking data is typically going to require an unordered and ordered table. The former houses the mathematical calculations and determines the ranking of each row, whilst the latter references it to output the data in the correct order. Part A and Part B are based off this principle. Part C, however, contains two variants that are not dependent on an additional table.

The tables in the workbook use these headers:

  • POS (position)
  • TEAM
  • P (matches played)
  • W (matches won)
  • D (matches drawn)
  • L (matches lost)
  • F (goals for)
  • A (goals against)
  • GD (goal difference)
  • PTS (points)
  • RANK* (table position when points are sorted in descending order)

*Table A2 only

Part A

The approaches here are all based on official Excel tables. The way to tell if what looks like a table is indeed a table— is to check if it has a small blue triangle in the bottom-right, or to click on it and the Table Design tab will appear in the ribbon.

We start off by creating **Table A1, **which is unordered and forms the base for **Table A2, Table A3 and Table A4 **to work off. The PWDL columns use COUNTIFS formulas to count the number of matches a team has played, won, drawn and lost respectively. It’s important to note that a single COUNTIFS formula only allows for AND conditions. That means all criteria must be met for a successful count. As we have home and away matches to consider, we need to use two COUNTIFS statements in the same cell to add the counts together. The same concept applies to the SUMIFS function, which has been used for the columns that involve addition: F and A.

#excel #football #premier-league #soccer #dynamic-array

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Building an Excel Football League Table — Traditional Methods vs Dynamic Arrays
Justyn  Ortiz

Justyn Ortiz

1598464800

Building an Excel Football League Table — Traditional Methods vs Dynamic Arrays

Image for post

Introduction

I

am going to show you the different ways you can build a football league table in Excel. Some of the methods are old school but others utilise Excel’s new capabilities.

In case you weren’t already aware, Excel has undergone a big change to its calculation engine fairly recently. The concept of dynamic arrays was first introduced back in September 2018, however, for many Microsoft 365 users the first batch of new functions took an awfully long time to appear. Unless you have been an Office Insider, you will not have been able to use them. Even though the update was rolled out to my copy towards the start of the year, there were still swathes of users who were kept waiting.

Since dynamic arrays were introduced in Excel, array formulas no long require you to press Ctrl + Shift + Return every time you edit a cell. This was an annoying practice that made many users, including myself, reluctant to use arrays. They just didn’t feel like a native and integrated part of Excel. Now you can use an array formula like any other — without that additional step.

If you want to find out more about the new functions, I recommend you visit Microsoft’s help page for each one: XLOOKUPFILTERUNIQUESORTBYSORTSEQUENCERANDARRAY.


Before we start

Download the workbook from here: https://bit.ly/39mlqkp.

Quick caveat: if you have an older version of Excel, you will find some of the examples do not work because of compatibility issues. This is unavoidable unless you purchase a Microsoft 365 subscription. Personally, I would recommend you do so.

Steps taken

Firstly, a dataset is required containing a list of all the matches played and their respective results. I have used English Premier League data from the 2019/20 season for this example. To conserve space elsewhere, the matches are stored in a separate worksheet called Data — with the table itself named DataTable.

Image for post

2019/20 Premier League Dataset

You’ll notice there’s a calculated column on the end called Result. This formula looks at the home_goal and away_goal fields for each match played and determines whether the outcome was a home win (H), draw (D) or away win (A).

There are three sections: Part APart B and Part C. Each contains multiple league tables that output identical values, but the method used differs.

Any kind of system that involves ranking data is typically going to require an unordered and ordered table. The former houses the mathematical calculations and determines the ranking of each row, whilst the latter references it to output the data in the correct order. Part A and Part B are based off this principle. Part C, however, contains two variants that are not dependent on an additional table.

The tables in the workbook use these headers:

  • POS (position)
  • TEAM
  • P (matches played)
  • W (matches won)
  • D (matches drawn)
  • L (matches lost)
  • F (goals for)
  • A (goals against)
  • GD (goal difference)
  • PTS (points)
  • RANK* (table position when points are sorted in descending order)

*Table A2 only

Part A

The approaches here are all based on official Excel tables. The way to tell if what looks like a table is indeed a table— is to check if it has a small blue triangle in the bottom-right, or to click on it and the Table Design tab will appear in the ribbon.

We start off by creating **Table A1, **which is unordered and forms the base for **Table A2, Table A3 and Table A4 **to work off. The PWDL columns use COUNTIFS formulas to count the number of matches a team has played, won, drawn and lost respectively. It’s important to note that a single COUNTIFS formula only allows for AND conditions. That means all criteria must be met for a successful count. As we have home and away matches to consider, we need to use two COUNTIFS statements in the same cell to add the counts together. The same concept applies to the SUMIFS function, which has been used for the columns that involve addition: F and A.

#excel #football #premier-league #soccer #dynamic-array

Gerhard  Brink

Gerhard Brink

1622622360

Data Validation in Excel

Data Validation in Excel

In this tutorial, let’s discuss what data validation is and how it can be implemented in MS-Excel. Let’s start!!!

What Is Data Validation in Excel?

Data Validation is one of the features in MS-Excel which helps in maintaining the consistency of the data in the spreadsheet. It controls the type of data that can enter in the data validated cells.

Data Validation in MS Excel

Now, let’s have a look at how data validation works and how to implement it in the worksheet:

To apply data validation for the cells, then follow the steps.

1: Choose to which all cells the validation of data should work.

2: Click on the DATA tab.

3: Go to the Data Validation option.

4: Choose the drop down option in it and click on the Data Validation.

data validation in Excel

Once you click on the data validation menu from the ribbon, a box appears with the list of data validation criteria, Input message and error message.

Let’s first understand, what is an input message and error message?

Once, the user clicks the cell, the input message appears in a small box near the cell.

If the user violates the condition of that particular cell, then the error message pops up in a box in the spreadsheet.

The advantage of both the messages is that the input and as well as the error message guide the user about how to fill the cells. Both the messages are customizable also.

Let us have a look at how to set it up and how it works with a sample

#ms excel tutorials #circle invalid data in excel #clear validation circles in excel #custom data validation in excel #data validation in excel #limitation in data validation in excel #setting up error message in excel #setting up input message in excel #troubleshooting formulas in excel #validate data in excel

Jones Brianna

Jones Brianna

1608787679

Fantasy Football App Development I Fantasy Football Software Development

https://www.mobiwebtech.com/fantasy-football-app-development/

As far as we know football is certainly the most popular and highest earning sport in the world. Investing in Fantasy Football is a great business opportunity. Millions of young sports enthusiasts are now hooked on fantasy sports websites.

#fantasy football app development #fantasy football software development #fantasy football website development #fantasy football app development services #create fantasy football app #hire fantasy football app developers

Fredy  Larson

Fredy Larson

1599278730

How to Build a Dynamic Array By Using a Static Array in Java

We all know about the basic data structure, which is** Array **pretty well. And in java they are static. It means we have to allocate memory for the array ahead of time. The memory will define the number of elements that the array can hold. But what if we have know idea about the exact number of elements that we are going to insert before hand. Then the best thing is to have a dynamic array.

A dynamic array automatically grows when we try to make an insertion and there is no space left for the new item. A simple dynamic array can be constructed, by using an array of fixed-size. The elements of the array are stored contiguously, for an instance, if it is an integer type array it will take 4 bytes of space per integer element. The remaining positions towards the end are reserved and unused. New elements can be added to the end of the array until the reserved space is fully utilized. If you still need to add up more elements even after that, the array needs to be resized which is a very expensive task. Usually it doubles its size.

Following is the Figure 1, where you can find the Array class, to model a dynamic behavior by using a static array in Java. Basic array operations are implemented below.

public class Array {

		private int[] items;
		private int count;

		public Array(int length) {

			items = new int[length];
		}

		public void print() {

			for(int i=0;i<count;i++) {
				System.out.println(items[i]);
			}
		}

		public void insert(int number) {

			//If an item is added to the end
			items[count]=number;
			count++;

			//If the array is full, resize it
			if(items.length == count) {

				int[] newItems = new int[count*2];

				for(int i=0;i<count;i++) {
					newItems[i]=items[i];
				}

				items=newItems;
			}

		}

		//Delete
		public void removeAt(int index) {

			if(index<0 || index>=count ) {
				throw new IllegalArgumentException();
			}	

			for(int i=index;i<count;i++) {
				items[i]=items[i+1];
			}

			count--;
		}

		//Search
		public int indexOf(int number) {

			for(int i=0;i<count;i++) {
				if(number == items[i]) {
					return i;
				}
			}

			return -1;

		}
	}

#dynamic-array #data-structures #java #arrays

Microsoft Excel Tutorial - Table vs Cell Range in MS Excel

In this MS Excel tutorials, video we are going to see the differnce between tables and cell ranges in MS Excel. Also we are going to see that how can we create a Table from data given to us and what all changes we can apply to our tables.

Welcome to the The Beginner’s Guide course to Excel. This course enables you to Learn MS Excel in simple and easy steps. In this Microsoft Excel Basics Tutorial series we will start from the basics and gradually move towards the Expert level in Microsoft Excel. This MS Excel course provides the Beginners to Intermediate Excel Skills, Tips, and Tricks. In this course we will learn how to Enter and edit Excel data, Format numbers, fonts and alignment, Make simple pivot tables and charts, Create simple Excel formulas, How to Use Excel Functions IF and VLOOKUP. Learn common Excel functions used in any Office, How to Create dynamic reports, Build Excel formulas to analyze date, text fields, values and arrays and much more advanced stuff.
In this video we will see the Overview of formulas in Excel. We will see Basic Excel formulas & functions with examples .

#microsoft excel #table #ms excel