Sadie  Cassin

Sadie Cassin

1598842020

Serving Static Assets in Django With Kubernetes

This article focuses on a strategy to deploy static assets, specifically assets generated with the create-react-app toolchain. The assets are served using Django deployed in a Kubernetes cluster on the Google cloud GKE platform.

The technologies used include Django, React, Dockergcloud and its related CLIs, e.g. gsutil. It explores an example of a Docker build pipeline that generates the image and pushes the static assets to a gcloud bucket. The article borrows heavily from Google’s own guide titled “Running Django on Google Kubernetes Engine” (referencedas Django GKE for the rest of the article).

It was found that the GKE guide had some blind spots, or rather specific use cases, that were not covered in the guide, and some of these gaps are addressed here. Anything not mentioned in this article is assumed to be covered in the Django GKE guide (e.g., creating GKE clusters as well as buckets and databases) so refer to it if you need to have the whole picture.

The article is divided into three main sections: the React App section, the Django section, and the build and deploy section. Everything in this article can be found in the django_react_k8s GitHub repository. As such, we will only look at the core points as opposed to going into detail on how to set it all up.


React App Setup

In the django_react_k8s repository, the static assets can be found in the ./static folder and were created using the following command.

npx create-react-app static

This installs a standard React application, but we need to make some modifications in order to serve static assets to Django in a production setting. The first set of modifications is to install packages that allow us to customize the create-react-app config. There packages can be installed by running:

yarn add -D react-app-rewired customize-cra webpack-bundle-tracker@0.4.3 write-file-webpack-plugin
  • The first package is the react-app-rewired which overrides the create-react-app webpack configs without having to eject it.
  • The customize-cra works in conjunction with react-app-rewired and provides useful utilities to perform the overrides.
  • The webpack-bundle-tracker spits out some stats about the webpack compilation process to a file. In this case, the stats file will provide an interface that makes Django aware of the different assets that have been generated, including their locations on disk or in the cloud. This is useful as filenames tend to be dynamically hashed during the production build process, and it will be quite cumbersome to keep hardcoding the changes in the Django app. Note the version to install is 0.4.3 due to a bug with the package in newer versions (see issue 227).
  • The write-file-webpack-plugin is a handy package that writes the generated static files to the file system during the development cycle. Using yarn start allows static content to be also accessed and served from Django locally.

#javascript #python #kubernetes #react #programming

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Serving Static Assets in Django With Kubernetes
Christa  Stehr

Christa Stehr

1602964260

50+ Useful Kubernetes Tools for 2020 - Part 2

Introduction

Last year, we provided a list of Kubernetes tools that proved so popular we have decided to curate another list of some useful additions for working with the platform—among which are many tools that we personally use here at Caylent. Check out the original tools list here in case you missed it.

According to a recent survey done by Stackrox, the dominance Kubernetes enjoys in the market continues to be reinforced, with 86% of respondents using it for container orchestration.

(State of Kubernetes and Container Security, 2020)

And as you can see below, more and more companies are jumping into containerization for their apps. If you’re among them, here are some tools to aid you going forward as Kubernetes continues its rapid growth.

(State of Kubernetes and Container Security, 2020)

#blog #tools #amazon elastic kubernetes service #application security #aws kms #botkube #caylent #cli #container monitoring #container orchestration tools #container security #containers #continuous delivery #continuous deployment #continuous integration #contour #developers #development #developments #draft #eksctl #firewall #gcp #github #harbor #helm #helm charts #helm-2to3 #helm-aws-secret-plugin #helm-docs #helm-operator-get-started #helm-secrets #iam #json #k-rail #k3s #k3sup #k8s #keel.sh #keycloak #kiali #kiam #klum #knative #krew #ksniff #kube #kube-prod-runtime #kube-ps1 #kube-scan #kube-state-metrics #kube2iam #kubeapps #kubebuilder #kubeconfig #kubectl #kubectl-aws-secrets #kubefwd #kubernetes #kubernetes command line tool #kubernetes configuration #kubernetes deployment #kubernetes in development #kubernetes in production #kubernetes ingress #kubernetes interfaces #kubernetes monitoring #kubernetes networking #kubernetes observability #kubernetes plugins #kubernetes secrets #kubernetes security #kubernetes security best practices #kubernetes security vendors #kubernetes service discovery #kubernetic #kubesec #kubeterminal #kubeval #kudo #kuma #microsoft azure key vault #mozilla sops #octant #octarine #open source #palo alto kubernetes security #permission-manager #pgp #rafay #rakess #rancher #rook #secrets operations #serverless function #service mesh #shell-operator #snyk #snyk container #sonobuoy #strongdm #tcpdump #tenkai #testing #tigera #tilt #vert.x #wireshark #yaml

Ahebwe  Oscar

Ahebwe Oscar

1620177818

Django admin full Customization step by step

Welcome to my blog , hey everyone in this article you learn how to customize the Django app and view in the article you will know how to register  and unregister  models from the admin view how to add filtering how to add a custom input field, and a button that triggers an action on all objects and even how to change the look of your app and page using the Django suit package let’s get started.

Database

Custom Titles of Django Admin

Exclude in Django Admin

Fields in Django Admin

#django #create super user django #customize django admin dashboard #django admin #django admin custom field display #django admin customization #django admin full customization #django admin interface #django admin register all models #django customization

Ahebwe  Oscar

Ahebwe Oscar

1620185280

How model queries work in Django

How model queries work in Django

Welcome to my blog, hey everyone in this article we are going to be working with queries in Django so for any web app that you build your going to want to write a query so you can retrieve information from your database so in this article I’ll be showing you all the different ways that you can write queries and it should cover about 90% of the cases that you’ll have when you’re writing your code the other 10% depend on your specific use case you may have to get more complicated but for the most part what I cover in this article should be able to help you so let’s start with the model that I have I’ve already created it.

**Read More : **How to make Chatbot in Python.

Read More : Django Admin Full Customization step by step

let’s just get into this diagram that I made so in here:

django queries aboutDescribe each parameter in Django querset

we’re making a simple query for the myModel table so we want to pull out all the information in the database so we have this variable which is gonna hold a return value and we have our myModel models so this is simply the myModel model name so whatever you named your model just make sure you specify that and we’re gonna access the objects attribute once we get that object’s attribute we can simply use the all method and this will return all the information in the database so we’re gonna start with all and then we will go into getting single items filtering that data and go to our command prompt.

Here and we’ll actually start making our queries from here to do this let’s just go ahead and run** Python manage.py shell** and I am in my project file so make sure you’re in there when you start and what this does is it gives us an interactive shell to actually start working with our data so this is a lot like the Python shell but because we did manage.py it allows us to do things a Django way and actually query our database now open up the command prompt and let’s go ahead and start making our first queries.

#django #django model queries #django orm #django queries #django query #model django query #model query #query with django

Maud  Rosenbaum

Maud Rosenbaum

1601051854

Kubernetes in the Cloud: Strategies for Effective Multi Cloud Implementations

Kubernetes is a highly popular container orchestration platform. Multi cloud is a strategy that leverages cloud resources from multiple vendors. Multi cloud strategies have become popular because they help prevent vendor lock-in and enable you to leverage a wide variety of cloud resources. However, multi cloud ecosystems are notoriously difficult to configure and maintain.

This article explains how you can leverage Kubernetes to reduce multi cloud complexities and improve stability, scalability, and velocity.

Kubernetes: Your Multi Cloud Strategy

Maintaining standardized application deployments becomes more challenging as your number of applications and the technologies they are based on increase. As environments, operating systems, and dependencies differ, management and operations require more effort and extensive documentation.

In the past, teams tried to get around these difficulties by creating isolated projects in the data center. Each project, including its configurations and requirements were managed independently. This required accurately predicting performance and the number of users before deployment and taking down applications to update operating systems or applications. There were many chances for error.

Kubernetes can provide an alternative to the old method, enabling teams to deploy applications independent of the environment in containers. This eliminates the need to create resource partitions and enables teams to operate infrastructure as a unified whole.

In particular, Kubernetes makes it easier to deploy a multi cloud strategy since it enables you to abstract away service differences. With Kubernetes deployments you can work from a consistent platform and optimize services and applications according to your business needs.

The Compelling Attributes of Multi Cloud Kubernetes

Multi cloud Kubernetes can provide multiple benefits beyond a single cloud deployment. Below are some of the most notable advantages.

Stability

In addition to the built-in scalability, fault tolerance, and auto-healing features of Kubernetes, multi cloud deployments can provide service redundancy. For example, you can mirror applications or split microservices across vendors. This reduces the risk of a vendor-related outage and enables you to create failovers.

#kubernetes #multicloud-strategy #kubernetes-cluster #kubernetes-top-story #kubernetes-cluster-install #kubernetes-explained #kubernetes-infrastructure #cloud

Tyrique  Littel

Tyrique Littel

1604008800

Static Code Analysis: What It Is? How to Use It?

Static code analysis refers to the technique of approximating the runtime behavior of a program. In other words, it is the process of predicting the output of a program without actually executing it.

Lately, however, the term “Static Code Analysis” is more commonly used to refer to one of the applications of this technique rather than the technique itself — program comprehension — understanding the program and detecting issues in it (anything from syntax errors to type mismatches, performance hogs likely bugs, security loopholes, etc.). This is the usage we’d be referring to throughout this post.

“The refinement of techniques for the prompt discovery of error serves as well as any other as a hallmark of what we mean by science.”

  • J. Robert Oppenheimer

Outline

We cover a lot of ground in this post. The aim is to build an understanding of static code analysis and to equip you with the basic theory, and the right tools so that you can write analyzers on your own.

We start our journey with laying down the essential parts of the pipeline which a compiler follows to understand what a piece of code does. We learn where to tap points in this pipeline to plug in our analyzers and extract meaningful information. In the latter half, we get our feet wet, and write four such static analyzers, completely from scratch, in Python.

Note that although the ideas here are discussed in light of Python, static code analyzers across all programming languages are carved out along similar lines. We chose Python because of the availability of an easy to use ast module, and wide adoption of the language itself.

How does it all work?

Before a computer can finally “understand” and execute a piece of code, it goes through a series of complicated transformations:

static analysis workflow

As you can see in the diagram (go ahead, zoom it!), the static analyzers feed on the output of these stages. To be able to better understand the static analysis techniques, let’s look at each of these steps in some more detail:

Scanning

The first thing that a compiler does when trying to understand a piece of code is to break it down into smaller chunks, also known as tokens. Tokens are akin to what words are in a language.

A token might consist of either a single character, like (, or literals (like integers, strings, e.g., 7Bob, etc.), or reserved keywords of that language (e.g, def in Python). Characters which do not contribute towards the semantics of a program, like trailing whitespace, comments, etc. are often discarded by the scanner.

Python provides the tokenize module in its standard library to let you play around with tokens:

Python

1

import io

2

import tokenize

3

4

code = b"color = input('Enter your favourite color: ')"

5

6

for token in tokenize.tokenize(io.BytesIO(code).readline):

7

    print(token)

Python

1

TokenInfo(type=62 (ENCODING),  string='utf-8')

2

TokenInfo(type=1  (NAME),      string='color')

3

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string='=')

4

TokenInfo(type=1  (NAME),      string='input')

5

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string='(')

6

TokenInfo(type=3  (STRING),    string="'Enter your favourite color: '")

7

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string=')')

8

TokenInfo(type=4  (NEWLINE),   string='')

9

TokenInfo(type=0  (ENDMARKER), string='')

(Note that for the sake of readability, I’ve omitted a few columns from the result above — metadata like starting index, ending index, a copy of the line on which a token occurs, etc.)

#code quality #code review #static analysis #static code analysis #code analysis #static analysis tools #code review tips #static code analyzer #static code analysis tool #static analyzer