Jolie  Reichert

Jolie Reichert

1595555820

The BitBucket vs GitHub Breakdown You Should Read

I’ve created this “BitBucket vs GitHub” content piece to help you make a better decision when picking between the two.

I’ve tried to be as descriptive as possible. If you feel like something is missing from the article, let me know in the comments and I’ll be sure to add it.

Without further ado:

What Is GitHub? — Preview

GitHub was founded in 2008 by Tom-Preston WernerChris WanstrathScott ChaconP. J. Hyett.

It’s written in Ruby and Erlang.

Right from the beginning, GitHub became a strong git advocate (as you can tell by its name) that hosts awesome GitHub open-source projects you can contribute to. It gained strong popularity among developers early in its growth. It now boasts over 50 million users and that number still grows.

To this date, GitHub has raised more than 350 million US dollars combined during its years of growth. In July 2012, GitHub received $100 million from venture capitalists Andreessen Horowitz. 3 years later, they completed a “Series B” round successfully with a total investment of $250 million from Sequoia Capital, Andreessen Horowitz, Thrive Capital and other venture capitalists.

When Microsoft announced that it’s going to acquire GitHub for $7.5 billion at the beginning of June 2018, a lot of software developers criticized the upcoming acquisition. A significant number of open source advocates migrated their git repositories over to BitBucket and GitLab as they initially feared Microsoft’s intentions. Microsoft, in the early 2000s, was known as not a big fan of open source software.

And what makes GitHub unique is that it’s based around open source making sharing code easy. That’s why GitHub can also be recognized as the home to open source nowadays.

#github #bitbucket #git #repositories-on-github #developer-tools #github-coding-workflow #hackernoon-top-story #programming

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The BitBucket vs GitHub Breakdown You Should Read
Jolie  Reichert

Jolie Reichert

1595555820

The BitBucket vs GitHub Breakdown You Should Read

I’ve created this “BitBucket vs GitHub” content piece to help you make a better decision when picking between the two.

I’ve tried to be as descriptive as possible. If you feel like something is missing from the article, let me know in the comments and I’ll be sure to add it.

Without further ado:

What Is GitHub? — Preview

GitHub was founded in 2008 by Tom-Preston WernerChris WanstrathScott ChaconP. J. Hyett.

It’s written in Ruby and Erlang.

Right from the beginning, GitHub became a strong git advocate (as you can tell by its name) that hosts awesome GitHub open-source projects you can contribute to. It gained strong popularity among developers early in its growth. It now boasts over 50 million users and that number still grows.

To this date, GitHub has raised more than 350 million US dollars combined during its years of growth. In July 2012, GitHub received $100 million from venture capitalists Andreessen Horowitz. 3 years later, they completed a “Series B” round successfully with a total investment of $250 million from Sequoia Capital, Andreessen Horowitz, Thrive Capital and other venture capitalists.

When Microsoft announced that it’s going to acquire GitHub for $7.5 billion at the beginning of June 2018, a lot of software developers criticized the upcoming acquisition. A significant number of open source advocates migrated their git repositories over to BitBucket and GitLab as they initially feared Microsoft’s intentions. Microsoft, in the early 2000s, was known as not a big fan of open source software.

And what makes GitHub unique is that it’s based around open source making sharing code easy. That’s why GitHub can also be recognized as the home to open source nowadays.

#github #bitbucket #git #repositories-on-github #developer-tools #github-coding-workflow #hackernoon-top-story #programming

Edison  Stark

Edison Stark

1603861600

How to Compare Multiple GitHub Projects with Our GitHub Stats tool

If you have project code hosted on GitHub, chances are you might be interested in checking some numbers and stats such as stars, commits and pull requests.

You might also want to compare some similar projects in terms of the above mentioned stats, for whatever reasons that interest you.

We have the right tool for you: the simple and easy-to-use little tool called GitHub Stats.

Let’s dive right in to what we can get out of it.

Getting started

This interactive tool is really easy to use. Follow the three steps below and you’ll get what you want in real-time:

1. Head to the GitHub repo of the tool

2. Enter as many projects as you need to check on

3. Hit the Update button beside each metric

In this article we are going to compare three most popular machine learning projects for you.

#github #tools #github-statistics-react #github-stats-tool #compare-github-projects #github-projects #software-development #programming

Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1598839687

How native is React Native? | React Native vs Native App Development

If you are undertaking a mobile app development for your start-up or enterprise, you are likely wondering whether to use React Native. As a popular development framework, React Native helps you to develop near-native mobile apps. However, you are probably also wondering how close you can get to a native app by using React Native. How native is React Native?

In the article, we discuss the similarities between native mobile development and development using React Native. We also touch upon where they differ and how to bridge the gaps. Read on.

A brief introduction to React Native

Let’s briefly set the context first. We will briefly touch upon what React Native is and how it differs from earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is a popular JavaScript framework that Facebook has created. You can use this open-source framework to code natively rendering Android and iOS mobile apps. You can use it to develop web apps too.

Facebook has developed React Native based on React, its JavaScript library. The first release of React Native came in March 2015. At the time of writing this article, the latest stable release of React Native is 0.62.0, and it was released in March 2020.

Although relatively new, React Native has acquired a high degree of popularity. The “Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2019” report identifies it as the 8th most loved framework. Facebook, Walmart, and Bloomberg are some of the top companies that use React Native.

The popularity of React Native comes from its advantages. Some of its advantages are as follows:

  • Performance: It delivers optimal performance.
  • Cross-platform development: You can develop both Android and iOS apps with it. The reuse of code expedites development and reduces costs.
  • UI design: React Native enables you to design simple and responsive UI for your mobile app.
  • 3rd party plugins: This framework supports 3rd party plugins.
  • Developer community: A vibrant community of developers support React Native.

Why React Native is fundamentally different from earlier hybrid frameworks

Are you wondering whether React Native is just another of those hybrid frameworks like Ionic or Cordova? It’s not! React Native is fundamentally different from these earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is very close to native. Consider the following aspects as described on the React Native website:

  • Access to many native platforms features: The primitives of React Native render to native platform UI. This means that your React Native app will use many native platform APIs as native apps would do.
  • Near-native user experience: React Native provides several native components, and these are platform agnostic.
  • The ease of accessing native APIs: React Native uses a declarative UI paradigm. This enables React Native to interact easily with native platform APIs since React Native wraps existing native code.

Due to these factors, React Native offers many more advantages compared to those earlier hybrid frameworks. We now review them.

#android app #frontend #ios app #mobile app development #benefits of react native #is react native good for mobile app development #native vs #pros and cons of react native #react mobile development #react native development #react native experience #react native framework #react native ios vs android #react native pros and cons #react native vs android #react native vs native #react native vs native performance #react vs native #why react native #why use react native

Monty  Boehm

Monty Boehm

1620027000

Git vs Github: Difference Between Git and Github

IT is in no way different from any other sector when it comes to naming. You would see some systems being named based on their origin while others are named keeping in mind their features or functionality. Then there are some whose names have nothing in common with their origin, features, or anything else related to them.

It is these inconsistencies in naming conventions that make people confused about what a system is all about, what it does, and what benefits it offers. For instance, there are a lot of people out there who still get puzzled when asked about Git and GitHub and whether or not there is a difference between the two.

The similarity in their names has nothing to do with what they really are. They are two altogether different things. But at the same time, you can say that they still have a thing or two in common. Before we talk about Git and GitHub, let us first shed some light on  version control systems (VCSs) and why are they so important.

What is version control?

In simple terms, version control is nothing but a system that keeps track of the changes made to source code or files. With a version control system, you can look back at the changes made to a particular file, either by you or another person, by accessing the version control database. This system gives you the ability to compare different versions of a file, thus allowing you to stay informed about the changes that have happened over a period of time.

The version control system can be referred to as a database that stores snapshots of different files in a project. These snapshots are taken every time a file is modified. It maintains all the records of the different versions of a file. In addition to comparing different versions of a file, VCSs also allows you to switch between them. VCSs can either be distributed or centralized. Let us see how these two types differ.

Centralized version control systems use a single, centralized server to store all the different versions of a file. Users can access these files by gaining access to this centralized server. Now, there is a disadvantage associated with this type of VCS. If the central server fails to function due to any reason, the entire history stored on its will be gone and no one will be able to recover any version/versions of the lost files.

Distributed version control systems have an edge over their centralized counterparts. These VCSs store file versions in two locations – the centralized server and your local machine. So, the disadvantage that we discussed centralized systems doesn’t exist in distributed systems.

Even if the server undergoes failure, you can retrieve all the different versions of your files from your local machine. Suppose you have a file, which is called VersionControl1. Now you made several changes to this file and saved the changes on each occasion. All the changes that you made to this file will be stored in the VCS, which will have all those versions of this file when you made changes to it.

#full stack development #git vs github #git #github

Jolie  Reichert

Jolie Reichert

1595581560

Stay Safe on GitHub: Security Practices to Follow

gthen Access Controls

Implementing proper access control is one of the best practices for enhancing security, not only on GitHub but in every other environment where code security is imperative.

GitHub offers several options that users can employ to reduce the risk of improper exposure. But to start with, it is important to employ the least privilege model where users are only granted necessary permissions.

Here are some basic access control guidelines that you should follow:

  • Restrict the creation of repositories to prevent users from exposing organization information in public repositories.
  • Enable branch protection and status checks to ensure users can merge commits or manipulate branches safely.
  • Allow or disallow forking private repositories to ensure users do not expose or share organizational code with unauthorized parties.
  • Revoke access for all inactive users who are no longer part of the contributors.
  • Review access rights to your GitHub projects periodically.
  • Ensure users do not share GitHub accounts or passwords.
  • Ensure every contributor uses two-factor authentication on their account.
  • Rotate personal access tokens and SSH keys

Never Store Credentials in Your GitHub Files

Leaking secrets to your GitHub repositories, either through code, configuration files, or commit messages, provides a gateway for attacks.

#tutorial #github #access control #software security #repository management #github issues #source code analysis #github apps #github enterprise #git best practices