Gizzy Berry

Gizzy Berry

1585466220

Introduction to MobX & React in 2020

A lot has changed since my first MobX video about 2 years ago. This is an updated version of that, covering hooks and how to use modern MobX with functional components.

Source code can be found here: https://github.com/leighhalliday/mobx2020
Artwork by James Gilleard - https://www.artstation.com/jamesgilleard

#reactjs #mobx #mobile-apps

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Introduction to MobX & React in 2020
Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1598839687

How native is React Native? | React Native vs Native App Development

If you are undertaking a mobile app development for your start-up or enterprise, you are likely wondering whether to use React Native. As a popular development framework, React Native helps you to develop near-native mobile apps. However, you are probably also wondering how close you can get to a native app by using React Native. How native is React Native?

In the article, we discuss the similarities between native mobile development and development using React Native. We also touch upon where they differ and how to bridge the gaps. Read on.

A brief introduction to React Native

Let’s briefly set the context first. We will briefly touch upon what React Native is and how it differs from earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is a popular JavaScript framework that Facebook has created. You can use this open-source framework to code natively rendering Android and iOS mobile apps. You can use it to develop web apps too.

Facebook has developed React Native based on React, its JavaScript library. The first release of React Native came in March 2015. At the time of writing this article, the latest stable release of React Native is 0.62.0, and it was released in March 2020.

Although relatively new, React Native has acquired a high degree of popularity. The “Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2019” report identifies it as the 8th most loved framework. Facebook, Walmart, and Bloomberg are some of the top companies that use React Native.

The popularity of React Native comes from its advantages. Some of its advantages are as follows:

  • Performance: It delivers optimal performance.
  • Cross-platform development: You can develop both Android and iOS apps with it. The reuse of code expedites development and reduces costs.
  • UI design: React Native enables you to design simple and responsive UI for your mobile app.
  • 3rd party plugins: This framework supports 3rd party plugins.
  • Developer community: A vibrant community of developers support React Native.

Why React Native is fundamentally different from earlier hybrid frameworks

Are you wondering whether React Native is just another of those hybrid frameworks like Ionic or Cordova? It’s not! React Native is fundamentally different from these earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is very close to native. Consider the following aspects as described on the React Native website:

  • Access to many native platforms features: The primitives of React Native render to native platform UI. This means that your React Native app will use many native platform APIs as native apps would do.
  • Near-native user experience: React Native provides several native components, and these are platform agnostic.
  • The ease of accessing native APIs: React Native uses a declarative UI paradigm. This enables React Native to interact easily with native platform APIs since React Native wraps existing native code.

Due to these factors, React Native offers many more advantages compared to those earlier hybrid frameworks. We now review them.

#android app #frontend #ios app #mobile app development #benefits of react native #is react native good for mobile app development #native vs #pros and cons of react native #react mobile development #react native development #react native experience #react native framework #react native ios vs android #react native pros and cons #react native vs android #react native vs native #react native vs native performance #react vs native #why react native #why use react native

Keith  Evans

Keith Evans

1652778000

MobX: Simple, Scalable State Management.

MobX

Simple, scalable state management.  


Documentation for older unsupported V4/V5 can be found here, but be sure to read about current documentation first.

MobX is made possible by the generosity of the sponsors below, and many other individual backers. Sponsoring directly impacts the longevity of this project.


Introduction

Anything that can be derived from the application state, should be. Automatically.

MobX is a battle tested library that makes state management simple and scalable by transparently applying functional reactive programming (TFRP). The philosophy behind MobX is simple:

😙

Straightforward

Write minimalistic, boilerplate free code that captures your intent. Trying to update a record field? Use the good old JavaScript assignment. Updating data in an asynchronous process? No special tools are required, the reactivity system will detect all your changes and propagate them out to where they are being used.

🚅

Effortless optimal rendering

All changes to and uses of your data are tracked at runtime, building a dependency tree that captures all relations between state and output. This guarantees that computations depending on your state, like React components, run only when strictly needed. There is no need to manually optimize components with error-prone and sub-optimal techniques like memoization and selectors.

🤹🏻‍♂️

Architectural freedom

MobX is unopinionated and allows you to manage your application state outside of any UI framework. This makes your code decoupled, portable, and above all, easily testable.

A quick example

So what does code that uses MobX look like?

import React from "react"
import ReactDOM from "react-dom"
import { makeAutoObservable } from "mobx"
import { observer } from "mobx-react"

// Model the application state.
class Timer {
    secondsPassed = 0

    constructor() {
        makeAutoObservable(this)
    }

    increase() {
        this.secondsPassed += 1
    }

    reset() {
        this.secondsPassed = 0
    }
}

const myTimer = new Timer()

// Build a "user interface" that uses the observable state.
const TimerView = observer(({ timer }) => (
    <button onClick={() => timer.reset()}>Seconds passed: {timer.secondsPassed}</button>
))

ReactDOM.render(<TimerView timer={myTimer} />, document.body)

// Update the 'Seconds passed: X' text every second.
setInterval(() => {
    myTimer.increase()
}, 1000)

The observer wrapper around the TimerView React component, will automatically detect that rendering depends on the timer.secondsPassed observable, even though this relationship is not explicitly defined. The reactivity system will take care of re-rendering the component when precisely that field is updated in the future.

Every event (onClick / setInterval) invokes an action (myTimer.increase / myTimer.reset) that updates observable state (myTimer.secondsPassed). Changes in the observable state are propagated precisely to all computations and side effects (TimerView) that depend on the changes being made.

MobX unidirectional flow

This conceptual picture can be applied to the above example, or any other application using MobX.

To learn about the core concepts of MobX using a larger example, check out The gist of MobX section, or take the 10 minute interactive introduction to MobX and React. The philosophy and benefits of the mental model provided by MobX are also described in great detail in the blog posts UI as an afterthought and How to decouple state and UI (a.k.a. you don’t need componentWillMount).

Download the MobX 6 cheat sheet

What others are saying...

Guise, #mobx isn't pubsub, or your grandpa's observer pattern. Nay, it is a carefully orchestrated observable dimensional portal fueled by the power cosmic. It doesn't do change detection, it's actually a level 20 psionic with soul knife, slashing your viewmodel into submission.

After using #mobx for lone projects for a few weeks, it feels awesome to introduce it to the team. Time: 1/2, Fun: 2X

Working with #mobx is basically a continuous loop of me going “this is way too simple, it definitely won’t work” only to be proven wrong

I have built big apps with MobX already and comparing to the one before that which was using Redux, it is simpler to read and much easier to reason about.

The #mobx is the way I always want things to be! It's really surprising simple and fast! Totally awesome! Don't miss it!

Further resources and documentation

The MobX book

Created by Pavan Podila and Michel Weststrate.

Videos

And an all around MobX awesome list.

Credits

MobX is inspired by reactive programming principles as found in the spreadsheets. It is inspired by MVVM frameworks like MeteorJS tracker, knockout and Vue.js, but MobX brings Transparent Functional Reactive Programming to the next level and provides a standalone implementation. It implements TFRP in a glitch-free, synchronous, predictable and efficient manner.

A ton of credits goes to Mendix, for providing the flexibility and support to maintain MobX and the chance to proof the philosophy of MobX in a real, complex, performance critical applications.


Author: mobxjs
Source Code: https://github.com/mobxjs/mobx
License: MIT license

#react-native #react #javascript #typescript 

Reid  Rohan

Reid Rohan

1653015300

Mobx: Simple, Scalable State Management

MobX

Simple, scalable state management.


MobX is made possible by the generosity of the sponsors below, and many other individual backers. Sponsoring directly impacts the longevity of this project.    


Introduction

Anything that can be derived from the application state, should be. Automatically.

MobX is a battle tested library that makes state management simple and scalable by transparently applying functional reactive programming (TFRP). The philosophy behind MobX is simple:

😙

Straightforward

Write minimalistic, boilerplate free code that captures your intent. Trying to update a record field? Use the good old JavaScript assignment. Updating data in an asynchronous process? No special tools are required, the reactivity system will detect all your changes and propagate them out to where they are being used.

🚅

Effortless optimal rendering

All changes to and uses of your data are tracked at runtime, building a dependency tree that captures all relations between state and output. This guarantees that computations depending on your state, like React components, run only when strictly needed. There is no need to manually optimize components with error-prone and sub-optimal techniques like memoization and selectors.

🤹🏻‍♂️

Architectural freedom

MobX is unopinionated and allows you to manage your application state outside of any UI framework. This makes your code decoupled, portable, and above all, easily testable.

A quick example

So what does code that uses MobX look like?

import React from "react"
import ReactDOM from "react-dom"
import { makeAutoObservable } from "mobx"
import { observer } from "mobx-react"

// Model the application state.
class Timer {
    secondsPassed = 0

    constructor() {
        makeAutoObservable(this)
    }

    increase() {
        this.secondsPassed += 1
    }

    reset() {
        this.secondsPassed = 0
    }
}

const myTimer = new Timer()

// Build a "user interface" that uses the observable state.
const TimerView = observer(({ timer }) => (
    <button onClick={() => timer.reset()}>Seconds passed: {timer.secondsPassed}</button>
))

ReactDOM.render(<TimerView timer={myTimer} />, document.body)

// Update the 'Seconds passed: X' text every second.
setInterval(() => {
    myTimer.increase()
}, 1000)

The observer wrapper around the TimerView React component, will automatically detect that rendering depends on the timer.secondsPassed observable, even though this relationship is not explicitly defined. The reactivity system will take care of re-rendering the component when precisely that field is updated in the future.

Every event (onClick / setInterval) invokes an action (myTimer.increase / myTimer.reset) that updates observable state (myTimer.secondsPassed). Changes in the observable state are propagated precisely to all computations and side effects (TimerView) that depend on the changes being made.

MobX unidirectional flow

This conceptual picture can be applied to the above example, or any other application using MobX.

To learn about the core concepts of MobX using a larger example, check out The gist of MobX section, or take the 10 minute interactive introduction to MobX and React. The philosophy and benefits of the mental model provided by MobX are also described in great detail in the blog posts UI as an afterthought and How to decouple state and UI (a.k.a. you don’t need componentWillMount).

Download the MobX 6 cheat sheet

What others are saying...

Guise, #mobx isn't pubsub, or your grandpa's observer pattern. Nay, it is a carefully orchestrated observable dimensional portal fueled by the power cosmic. It doesn't do change detection, it's actually a level 20 psionic with soul knife, slashing your viewmodel into submission.

After using #mobx for lone projects for a few weeks, it feels awesome to introduce it to the team. Time: 1/2, Fun: 2X

Working with #mobx is basically a continuous loop of me going “this is way too simple, it definitely won’t work” only to be proven wrong

I have built big apps with MobX already and comparing to the one before that which was using Redux, it is simpler to read and much easier to reason about.

The #mobx is the way I always want things to be! It's really surprising simple and fast! Totally awesome! Don't miss it!

Further resources and documentation

The MobX book

Created by Pavan Podila and Michel Weststrate.

Videos

And an all around MobX awesome list.

Credits

MobX is inspired by reactive programming principles as found in the spreadsheets. It is inspired by MVVM frameworks like MeteorJS tracker, knockout and Vue.js, but MobX brings Transparent Functional Reactive Programming to the next level and provides a standalone implementation. It implements TFRP in a glitch-free, synchronous, predictable and efficient manner.

A ton of credits goes to Mendix, for providing the flexibility and support to maintain MobX and the chance to proof the philosophy of MobX in a real, complex, performance critical applications.

Documentation for older unsupported V4/V5 can be found here, but be sure to read about current documentation first.

Author: Mobxjs
Source Code: https://github.com/mobxjs/mobx 
License: MIT license

#react #javascript #typescript #mobx 

Brain  Crist

Brain Crist

1594753020

Citrix Bugs Allow Unauthenticated Code Injection, Data Theft

Multiple vulnerabilities in the Citrix Application Delivery Controller (ADC) and Gateway would allow code injection, information disclosure and denial of service, the networking vendor announced Tuesday. Four of the bugs are exploitable by an unauthenticated, remote attacker.

The Citrix products (formerly known as NetScaler ADC and Gateway) are used for application-aware traffic management and secure remote access, respectively, and are installed in at least 80,000 companies in 158 countries, according to a December assessment from Positive Technologies.

Other flaws announced Tuesday also affect Citrix SD-WAN WANOP appliances, models 4000-WO, 4100-WO, 5000-WO and 5100-WO.

Attacks on the management interface of the products could result in system compromise by an unauthenticated user on the management network; or system compromise through cross-site scripting (XSS). Attackers could also create a download link for the device which, if downloaded and then executed by an unauthenticated user on the management network, could result in the compromise of a local computer.

“Customers who have configured their systems in accordance with Citrix recommendations [i.e., to have this interface separated from the network and protected by a firewall] have significantly reduced their risk from attacks to the management interface,” according to the vendor.

Threat actors could also mount attacks on Virtual IPs (VIPs). VIPs, among other things, are used to provide users with a unique IP address for communicating with network resources for applications that do not allow multiple connections or users from the same IP address.

The VIP attacks include denial of service against either the Gateway or Authentication virtual servers by an unauthenticated user; or remote port scanning of the internal network by an authenticated Citrix Gateway user.

“Attackers can only discern whether a TLS connection is possible with the port and cannot communicate further with the end devices,” according to the critical Citrix advisory. “Customers who have not enabled either the Gateway or Authentication virtual servers are not at risk from attacks that are applicable to those servers. Other virtual servers e.g. load balancing and content switching virtual servers are not affected by these issues.”

A final vulnerability has been found in Citrix Gateway Plug-in for Linux that would allow a local logged-on user of a Linux system with that plug-in installed to elevate their privileges to an administrator account on that computer, the company said.

#vulnerabilities #adc #citrix #code injection #critical advisory #cve-2020-8187 #cve-2020-8190 #cve-2020-8191 #cve-2020-8193 #cve-2020-8194 #cve-2020-8195 #cve-2020-8196 #cve-2020-8197 #cve-2020-8198 #cve-2020-8199 #denial of service #gateway #information disclosure #patches #security advisory #security bugs

Lawrence  Lesch

Lawrence Lesch

1642823640

MobX: TFRP Library for Simple, Scalable State Management

MobX

Simple, scalable state management.


Documentation for older unsupported V4/V5 can be found here, but be sure to read about current documentation first.

MobX is made possible by the generosity of the sponsors below, and many other individual backers. Sponsoring directly impacts the longevity of this project.  


Introduction

Anything that can be derived from the application state, should be. Automatically.

MobX is a battle tested library that makes state management simple and scalable by transparently applying functional reactive programming (TFRP). The philosophy behind MobX is simple:

😙

Straightforward

Write minimalistic, boilerplate free code that captures your intent. Trying to update a record field? Use the good old JavaScript assignment. Updating data in an asynchronous process? No special tools are required, the reactivity system will detect all your changes and propagate them out to where they are being used.

🚅

Effortless optimal rendering

All changes to and uses of your data are tracked at runtime, building a dependency tree that captures all relations between state and output. This guarantees that computations depending on your state, like React components, run only when strictly needed. There is no need to manually optimize components with error-prone and sub-optimal techniques like memoization and selectors.

🤹🏻‍♂️

Architectural freedom

MobX is unopinionated and allows you to manage your application state outside of any UI framework. This makes your code decoupled, portable, and above all, easily testable.

A quick example

So what does code that uses MobX look like?

import React from "react"
import ReactDOM from "react-dom"
import { makeAutoObservable } from "mobx"
import { observer } from "mobx-react"

// Model the application state.
class Timer {
    secondsPassed = 0

    constructor() {
        makeAutoObservable(this)
    }

    increase() {
        this.secondsPassed += 1
    }

    reset() {
        this.secondsPassed = 0
    }
}

const myTimer = new Timer()

// Build a "user interface" that uses the observable state.
const TimerView = observer(({ timer }) => (
    <button onClick={() => timer.reset()}>Seconds passed: {timer.secondsPassed}</button>
))

ReactDOM.render(<TimerView timer={myTimer} />, document.body)

// Update the 'Seconds passed: X' text every second.
setInterval(() => {
    myTimer.increase()
}, 1000)

The observer wrapper around the TimerView React component, will automatically detect that rendering depends on the timer.secondsPassed observable, even though this relationship is not explicitly defined. The reactivity system will take care of re-rendering the component when precisely that field is updated in the future.

Every event (onClick / setInterval) invokes an action (myTimer.increase / myTimer.reset) that updates observable state (myTimer.secondsPassed). Changes in the observable state are propagated precisely to all computations and side effects (TimerView) that depend on the changes being made.

MobX unidirectional flow

This conceptual picture can be applied to the above example, or any other application using MobX.

To learn about the core concepts of MobX using a larger example, check out The gist of MobX section, or take the 10 minute interactive introduction to MobX and React. The philosophy and benefits of the mental model provided by MobX are also described in great detail in the blog posts UI as an afterthought and How to decouple state and UI (a.k.a. you don’t need componentWillMount).

Download the MobX 6 cheat sheet

What others are saying...

Guise, #mobx isn't pubsub, or your grandpa's observer pattern. Nay, it is a carefully orchestrated observable dimensional portal fueled by the power cosmic. It doesn't do change detection, it's actually a level 20 psionic with soul knife, slashing your viewmodel into submission.

After using #mobx for lone projects for a few weeks, it feels awesome to introduce it to the team. Time: 1/2, Fun: 2X

Working with #mobx is basically a continuous loop of me going “this is way too simple, it definitely won’t work” only to be proven wrong

I have built big apps with MobX already and comparing to the one before that which was using Redux, it is simpler to read and much easier to reason about.

The #mobx is the way I always want things to be! It's really surprising simple and fast! Totally awesome! Don't miss it!

Further resources and documentation

The MobX book

Created by Pavan Podila and Michel Weststrate.

Videos

And an all around MobX awesome list.

Credits

MobX is inspired by reactive programming principles as found in the spreadsheets. It is inspired by MVVM frameworks like MeteorJS tracker, knockout and Vue.js, but MobX brings Transparent Functional Reactive Programming to the next level and provides a standalone implementation. It implements TFRP in a glitch-free, synchronous, predictable and efficient manner.

A ton of credits goes to Mendix, for providing the flexibility and support to maintain MobX and the chance to proof the philosophy of MobX in a real, complex, performance critical applications.

Author: Mobxjs
Source Code: https://github.com/mobxjs/mobx 
License: MIT License

#javascript #react-native #typescript