Carmella  Pagac

Carmella Pagac

1627182209

Fastest How to copy Color Code from any Web Page using Firefox or Chrome

Many times we look at a color on a web page and wish we could copy that exact color code. This quick video demonstrates how to do that using Firefox and Chrome browser without any add-ons or extensions.

For more such tips, tricks and tutorials, subscribe to this channel.

#Firefox

#firefox

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Fastest How to copy Color Code from any Web Page using Firefox or Chrome
Carmen  Grimes

Carmen Grimes

1603280160

Coming through with Firefox 82 – Mozilla Hacks

As October ushers in the tail-end of the year, we are pushing Firefox 82 out the door. This time around we finally enable support for the Media Session API, provide some new CSS pseudo-selector behaviours, close some security loopholes involving the Window.name property, and provide inspection for server-sent events in our developer tools.

This blog post provides merely a set of highlights; for all the details, check out the following:

Inspecting server-sent events

Server-sent events allow for an inversion of the traditional client-initiated web request model, with a server sending new data to a web page at any time by pushing messages. In this release we’ve added the ability to inspect server-sent events and their message contents using the Network Monitor.

You can go to the Network Monitor, select the file that is sending the server-sent events, and view the received messages in the Response tab on the right-hand panel.

For more information, check out our Inspecting server-sent events guide.

Web platform updates

Now let’s look at the web platform additions we’ve got in store in 82.

Media Session API

The Media Session API enables two main sets of functionality:

  1. First of all, it provides a way to customize media notifications. It does this by providing metadata for display by the operating system for the media your web app is playing.
  2. Second, it provides event handlers that the browser can use to access platform media keys such as hardware keys found on keyboards, headsets, remote controls, and software keys found in notification areas and on lock screens of mobile devices. So you can seamlessly control web-provided media via your device, even when not looking at the web page.

#developer tools #featured article #firefox #firefox releases #css #firefox #firefox 82 #firefox developer edition #firefox release #web extensions

Tyrique  Littel

Tyrique Littel

1604008800

Static Code Analysis: What It Is? How to Use It?

Static code analysis refers to the technique of approximating the runtime behavior of a program. In other words, it is the process of predicting the output of a program without actually executing it.

Lately, however, the term “Static Code Analysis” is more commonly used to refer to one of the applications of this technique rather than the technique itself — program comprehension — understanding the program and detecting issues in it (anything from syntax errors to type mismatches, performance hogs likely bugs, security loopholes, etc.). This is the usage we’d be referring to throughout this post.

“The refinement of techniques for the prompt discovery of error serves as well as any other as a hallmark of what we mean by science.”

  • J. Robert Oppenheimer

Outline

We cover a lot of ground in this post. The aim is to build an understanding of static code analysis and to equip you with the basic theory, and the right tools so that you can write analyzers on your own.

We start our journey with laying down the essential parts of the pipeline which a compiler follows to understand what a piece of code does. We learn where to tap points in this pipeline to plug in our analyzers and extract meaningful information. In the latter half, we get our feet wet, and write four such static analyzers, completely from scratch, in Python.

Note that although the ideas here are discussed in light of Python, static code analyzers across all programming languages are carved out along similar lines. We chose Python because of the availability of an easy to use ast module, and wide adoption of the language itself.

How does it all work?

Before a computer can finally “understand” and execute a piece of code, it goes through a series of complicated transformations:

static analysis workflow

As you can see in the diagram (go ahead, zoom it!), the static analyzers feed on the output of these stages. To be able to better understand the static analysis techniques, let’s look at each of these steps in some more detail:

Scanning

The first thing that a compiler does when trying to understand a piece of code is to break it down into smaller chunks, also known as tokens. Tokens are akin to what words are in a language.

A token might consist of either a single character, like (, or literals (like integers, strings, e.g., 7Bob, etc.), or reserved keywords of that language (e.g, def in Python). Characters which do not contribute towards the semantics of a program, like trailing whitespace, comments, etc. are often discarded by the scanner.

Python provides the tokenize module in its standard library to let you play around with tokens:

Python

1

import io

2

import tokenize

3

4

code = b"color = input('Enter your favourite color: ')"

5

6

for token in tokenize.tokenize(io.BytesIO(code).readline):

7

    print(token)

Python

1

TokenInfo(type=62 (ENCODING),  string='utf-8')

2

TokenInfo(type=1  (NAME),      string='color')

3

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string='=')

4

TokenInfo(type=1  (NAME),      string='input')

5

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string='(')

6

TokenInfo(type=3  (STRING),    string="'Enter your favourite color: '")

7

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string=')')

8

TokenInfo(type=4  (NEWLINE),   string='')

9

TokenInfo(type=0  (ENDMARKER), string='')

(Note that for the sake of readability, I’ve omitted a few columns from the result above — metadata like starting index, ending index, a copy of the line on which a token occurs, etc.)

#code quality #code review #static analysis #static code analysis #code analysis #static analysis tools #code review tips #static code analyzer #static code analysis tool #static analyzer

Carmella  Pagac

Carmella Pagac

1627182209

Fastest How to copy Color Code from any Web Page using Firefox or Chrome

Many times we look at a color on a web page and wish we could copy that exact color code. This quick video demonstrates how to do that using Firefox and Chrome browser without any add-ons or extensions.

For more such tips, tricks and tutorials, subscribe to this channel.

#Firefox

#firefox

Firefox 81 Release Kills High-Severity Code-Execution Bugs

Mozilla patched high-severity vulnerabilities with the release of Firefox 81 and Firefox ESR 78.3, including several that could be exploited to run arbitrary code.

Two severe bugs (CVE-2020-15674 and CVE-2020-15673) are errors in the browser’s memory-safety protections, which prevent memory access issues like buffer overflows. CVE-2020-15674 was reported in Firefox 80, while CVE-2020-15673 was reported in Firefox 80 and Firefox ESR 78.2. Firefox ESR (Extended Support Release) is a Firefox version that’s based on an official release for desktop, for use by organizations who need extended support for mass deployments.

“Some of these bugs showed evidence of memory corruption, and we presume that with enough effort some of these could have been exploited to run arbitrary code,” according to a Mozilla Foundation security advisory, released on Tuesday.

#vulnerabilities #web security #buffer error #cve-2020-15673 #cve-2020-15674 #cve-2020-15675 #firefox #firefox 80 #firefox 81 #firefox esr 78.3 #memory safety #mozilla #mozilla foundation #use-after-free #vulnerability #webgl

Debugging Variables With Watchpoints in Firefox 72

The Firefox Devtools team, along with our community of code contributors, have been working hard to pack Firefox 72 full of improvements. This post introduces the watchpoints feature that’s available right now in Firefox Developer Edition! Keep reading to get up to speed on watchpoints and how to use them.

#debugging #developer tools #featured article #firefox #firefox releases #breakpoints #debugger #debugger for firefox #firefox devtools #firefox visual studio code extension #watchpoints