Bette  Shanahan

Bette Shanahan

1611157421

Getting Started with Docker

Do you have questions about getting started with Docker? We’re here to help! This workshop is for people who are new to Docker and are keen to learn how to containerize their application and push images to Docker Hub.

#docker #devops

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Getting Started with Docker
Iliana  Welch

Iliana Welch

1595249460

Docker Explained: Docker Architecture | Docker Registries

Following the second video about Docker basics, in this video, I explain Docker architecture and explain the different building blocks of the docker engine; docker client, API, Docker Daemon. I also explain what a docker registry is and I finish the video with a demo explaining and illustrating how to use Docker hub

In this video lesson you will learn:

  • What is Docker Host
  • What is Docker Engine
  • Learn about Docker Architecture
  • Learn about Docker client and Docker Daemon
  • Docker Hub and Registries
  • Simple demo to understand using images from registries

#docker #docker hub #docker host #docker engine #docker architecture #api

Turner  Crona

Turner Crona

1595743860

Top Questions for Getting Started with Docker

What is the difference between Virtual Machines (VM) and Containers?

This is a great question and I get this one a lot. The simplest way I can explain the differences between Virtual Machines and Containers is that a VM virtualizes the hardware and a Container “virtualizes” the OS.

If you take a look at the image above, you can see that there are multiple Operating Systems running when using Virtual Machine technology. Which produces a huge difference in start up times and various other constraints and overhead when installing and maintaining a full blow operating system. Also, with VMs, you can run different flavors of operating systems. For example, I can run Windows 10 and a Linux distribution on the same hardware at the same time. Now let’s take a look at the image for Docker Containers.

As you can see in this image, we only have one Host Operating System installed on our infrastructure. Docker sits “on top” of the host operating system. Each application is then bundled in an image that contains all the configuration, libraries, files and executables the application needs to run.

#community #products #containers #docker #getting started #top questions

Docker Architecture Overview & Docker Components [For Beginners]

If you have recently come across the world of containers, it’s probably not a bad idea to understand the underlying elements that work together to offer containerisation benefits. But before that, there’s a question that you may ask. What problem do containers solve?

After building an application in a typical development lifecycle, the developer sends it to the tester for testing purposes. However, since the development and testing environments are different, the code fails to work.

Now, predominantly, there are two solutions to this – either you use a Virtual Machine or a containerised environment such as Docker. In the good old times, organisations used to deploy VMs for running multiple applications.

So, why did they started adopting containerisation over VMs? In this article, we will provide detailed explanations of all such questions.

#docker containers #docker engine #docker #docker architecture

Docker manifest - A peek into image's manifest.json files

docker manifest – An experimental feature !

The image manifest provides a configuration and a set of layers for a container image.

This is an experimental feature. To enable this feature in the Docker CLI, one can edit the config.json file found in ~/.docker/config.json like :

{
        "auths": {
                "https://index.docker.io/v1/": {
                        "auth": "XXXXXXX"
                }
        },
        "HttpHeaders": {
                "User-Agent": "Docker-Client/19.03.8 (linux)"
        },
        "experimental": "enabled",
        "debug": true
}

What is ‘docker manifest’ ?

The docker manifest command does not work independently to perform any action. In order to work with the docker manifest or manifest list, we use sub-commands along with it. This manifest sub-command can enable us to interact with the image manifests. Furthermore, it also gives information about the OS and the architecture, that a particular image was built for.

A single manifest comprises of information about an image, it’s size, the layers and digest.

A manifest list is a list of image layers (manifests) that are, created by specifying one or more image names. It can then be used in the same way as an image name in docker pull and docker run commands.

Commands to get started with :

After enabling this feature, one would be able to access the following command :

docker-manifest-enter image description here

These commands are easy to use. It basically avoids the need for pulling and running and then testing the images locally, from a docker registry.

Next, to inspect an image manifest, follow this syntax,

 docker manifest inspect image-name

enter image description here

.

#devops #docker #devops #docker #docker learning #docker-image

Iliana  Welch

Iliana Welch

1597368540

Docker Tutorial for Beginners 8 - Build and Run C++ Applications in a Docker Container

Docker is an open platform that allows use package, develop, run, and ship software applications in different environments using containers.
In this course We will learn How to Write Dockerfiles, Working with the Docker Toolbox, How to Work with the Docker Machine, How to Use Docker Compose to fire up multiple containers, How to Work with Docker Kinematic, Push images to Docker Hub, Pull images from a Docker Registery, Push stacks of servers to Docker Hub.
How to install Docker on Mac.

#docker tutorial #c++ #docker container #docker #docker hub #devopstools