Hugo JS

Hugo JS

1599295469

What is Callback-Function in JavaScript? How it is Replaced By Promises?

Let us understand term _Callback _by an real-world example: Suppose, you are calling to your Girlfriend (If you have) and she is busy in another call then she send message to you : “I am busy right now, Call back you later.!!”. After completing her work, she calls you back and this is what call back in JavaScript as well.

In JavaScript, When a function is executing (Girlfriend is talking with someone) then after function execution is completed another function is started for execution this is call back function.

Now you are thinking that its depend upon when, where you are calling function and all function call is “Call-back function”. Image for post

Here, _printWorld() _function is executed after _printHello() _complete its execution but this is not call-back function example because _printHello() _is not Asynchronous function. Suppose, _printHello() _prints after 1 Second then _printWorld() _executes first.

Image for post

What if we want “Hello World” output when Asynchronous function is there. We can pass function as argument and calls it after _printHello() _complete its execution. Here below code snippet of how _function pass as argument _:

Image for post

Callback function can be defined as a function passed by argument and executes when one function completes its execution.

Suppose, If you have API (Application Programming Interface) to get Students Roll numbers and select one of Roll number — getting that roll number’s data and print that data. We don’t have API to get students data so we are using _setTimeout() _Async function and getting roll number after 2s, We are also selecting one of roll number manually after 2s and print Roll number’s data after 2s. This can be done by call back function.

Image for post

The program became complex and complex if we have too many things to do like Getting Students data, Selecting one of them student, get student’s roll number and get result by roll number then it become very complex. If you have any Error in this then debugging is also tedious task, this things is called “Callback Hell”, which is shape like “Pyramid Of Doom”.

To overcome with this problem, Promises is introduced in JavaScript. Promises has three states : Pending, Resolved, Reject. Promises is created by Constructor : new Promise(). It has one executor function which has two arguments (resolve, reject).

Promise object has three methods: then(), catch() & finally().

Image for post

If Promise is successfully executed then its data is transferred through resolve function and if it has error then passed through reject function.

We have implemented same task which is done using call back function in Promises and its easily understandable However it is complicated compare to callback function but when you use promises for sometimes then it’s easy to implement.

In _getRollNumber(), _resolve method’s data is caught by then() functions arguments and reject method’s data is caught by catch() function. Here In Promises, Every task has different promises because of that it is easy to debug and readable compare to call back function. You can see that there is no shape like “Pyramid of Doom” in Promises. This is how Callback function is replaced by Promises.

Thank you for reading!

This article was originally published on Medium.com

#javascript-tips #advanced-javascript #javascript #callback-function #promises

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

What is Callback-Function in JavaScript? How it is Replaced By Promises?
Hugo JS

Hugo JS

1599295469

What is Callback-Function in JavaScript? How it is Replaced By Promises?

Let us understand term _Callback _by an real-world example: Suppose, you are calling to your Girlfriend (If you have) and she is busy in another call then she send message to you : “I am busy right now, Call back you later.!!”. After completing her work, she calls you back and this is what call back in JavaScript as well.

In JavaScript, When a function is executing (Girlfriend is talking with someone) then after function execution is completed another function is started for execution this is call back function.

Now you are thinking that its depend upon when, where you are calling function and all function call is “Call-back function”. Image for post

Here, _printWorld() _function is executed after _printHello() _complete its execution but this is not call-back function example because _printHello() _is not Asynchronous function. Suppose, _printHello() _prints after 1 Second then _printWorld() _executes first.

Image for post

What if we want “Hello World” output when Asynchronous function is there. We can pass function as argument and calls it after _printHello() _complete its execution. Here below code snippet of how _function pass as argument _:

Image for post

Callback function can be defined as a function passed by argument and executes when one function completes its execution.

Suppose, If you have API (Application Programming Interface) to get Students Roll numbers and select one of Roll number — getting that roll number’s data and print that data. We don’t have API to get students data so we are using _setTimeout() _Async function and getting roll number after 2s, We are also selecting one of roll number manually after 2s and print Roll number’s data after 2s. This can be done by call back function.

Image for post

The program became complex and complex if we have too many things to do like Getting Students data, Selecting one of them student, get student’s roll number and get result by roll number then it become very complex. If you have any Error in this then debugging is also tedious task, this things is called “Callback Hell”, which is shape like “Pyramid Of Doom”.

To overcome with this problem, Promises is introduced in JavaScript. Promises has three states : Pending, Resolved, Reject. Promises is created by Constructor : new Promise(). It has one executor function which has two arguments (resolve, reject).

Promise object has three methods: then(), catch() & finally().

Image for post

If Promise is successfully executed then its data is transferred through resolve function and if it has error then passed through reject function.

We have implemented same task which is done using call back function in Promises and its easily understandable However it is complicated compare to callback function but when you use promises for sometimes then it’s easy to implement.

In _getRollNumber(), _resolve method’s data is caught by then() functions arguments and reject method’s data is caught by catch() function. Here In Promises, Every task has different promises because of that it is easy to debug and readable compare to call back function. You can see that there is no shape like “Pyramid of Doom” in Promises. This is how Callback function is replaced by Promises.

Thank you for reading!

This article was originally published on Medium.com

#javascript-tips #advanced-javascript #javascript #callback-function #promises

Jeromy  Lowe

Jeromy Lowe

1595553079

Intro to Callback in JavaScript

During my journey of learning JavaScript and a few days in with React, I had to come to terms with callback functions. It was impossible to avoid its existence and blindly using it without understanding. To understand callback function we have to know a bit about functions. Here I want to talk about function expression, arrow function, and callback function.


What is a Callback function?

According to MDN doc:

A callback function is a function passed into another function as an argument, which is then invoked inside the outer function to complete some kind of routine or action.

In JavaScript, functions are objects, which means, like any other objects it can be assigned to a variable and passed as an argument to another function. In a nutshell, a callback function is a function that is provided as a parameter for other methods such as forEach method or addEventListener method and gets invoked at a certain point in time.

Passing functions as arguments

So how do we do this? Let’s see with an example below:

document.addEventListener(‘click’,whoAmI);

//whoAmI Function Declaration(Function Statement)
function whoAmI(event){
  console.log(event.target.tagName)
}

We attached the ‘click’ event listener to document with whoAmI function as a parameter that logs the tag name of the clicked target. Whenever ‘click’ happens whoAmI function will be called with an _event_ argument. We call whoAmI a callback function.

When we call a function by its name followed by ( ), we are telling the function to execute its code. When we name a function or pass a function without the ( ), the function does not execute.** The callback function doesn’t execute right away. Instead, the addEventListener method executes the function when the event occurs.**

One more thing I want to mention is because we used function declaration, we were able to call thewhoAmI function before it was declared. It’s the magic of hoisting in JS. But with function expression, it doesn’t get hoisted. So the order of writing function expressions and using them as callback would be crucial.

#callback #javascript #callback-function #function #javascript-fundamental

Vincent Lab

Vincent Lab

1605017502

The Difference Between Regular Functions and Arrow Functions in JavaScript

Other then the syntactical differences. The main difference is the way the this keyword behaves? In an arrow function, the this keyword remains the same throughout the life-cycle of the function and is always bound to the value of this in the closest non-arrow parent function. Arrow functions can never be constructor functions so they can never be invoked with the new keyword. And they can never have duplicate named parameters like a regular function not using strict mode.

Here are a few code examples to show you some of the differences
this.name = "Bob";

const person = {
name: “Jon”,

<span style="color: #008000">// Regular function</span>
func1: <span style="color: #0000ff">function</span> () {
    console.log(<span style="color: #0000ff">this</span>);
},

<span style="color: #008000">// Arrow function</span>
func2: () =&gt; {
    console.log(<span style="color: #0000ff">this</span>);
}

}

person.func1(); // Call the Regular function
// Output: {name:“Jon”, func1:[Function: func1], func2:[Function: func2]}

person.func2(); // Call the Arrow function
// Output: {name:“Bob”}

The new keyword with an arrow function
const person = (name) => console.log("Your name is " + name);
const bob = new person("Bob");
// Uncaught TypeError: person is not a constructor

If you want to see a visual presentation on the differences, then you can see the video below:

#arrow functions #javascript #regular functions #arrow functions vs normal functions #difference between functions and arrow functions

Madyson  Reilly

Madyson Reilly

1601069940

Function Expression vs Function Declaration in JavaScript

Function Expression vs Function Declaration in JavaScript.

It was until during one of the JavaScript mock interviews did I came across the term function expression.

The question was: What is the difference between these two syntax?

function x(){

}

let x = function(){

}

I was clueless for a moment. After thinking a little, I could only come up with: the second syntax invokes an _anonymous _function and is assigned to a variable.

I was alien to the term hoisting.

In this article, we will acquaint ourselves with three simple terms: function declaration,_ function expression, _and hoisting.

What is function declaration?

Function declaration is also known as _function statement. _It contains the name of the function, parameters, and a return statement. **Naming the function **is what sets function declaration apart. Parameters and return statement is optional.

Image for post

Function Declaration

What is function expression?

Function expression also has a name, parameters, and return statement. All of which are optional. The important thing to bear in mind is: the function here is _assigned _to a JavaScript variable.

Image for post

Function Expression

#function-expression #function-declaration #functions-in-javascript #coding #javascript #express

Julie  Donnelly

Julie Donnelly

1602406920

JavaScript Promise: Methods Comparison

Introduction

Promises in JavaScript are used to handle asynchronous operations by keeping track of whether a certain event has happened. If that certain event has taken place, it determines what happens next. Promises return a value which is either a resolved value or a reason why it’s rejected. They can handle multiple asynchronous operations easily and they provide better error handling than callbacks and events.

Callback: A callback is a function that is passed into another function as an argument to be executed later.

Events: Events provide a dynamic interface to a WebPage and are connected to elements in the Document Object Model(DOM), for example: onclick(), onmouseover() etc.

A Promise has four states

Pending: Before the event has happened, the promise is in the pending state.

Settled: Once the event has happened it is then in the settled state.

Fulfilled: Action related to the promise has succeeded.

Rejected: Action related to the promise has failed.

#javascript #javascript-development #javascript-tutorial #promises #javascript-tips