10 Podcasts for Developers in 2019

10 Podcasts for Developers in 2019

10 Podcasts for Developers in 2019

There are very few good things about having a commute to work every day. Dev podcasts is one of them. You can learn something new, keep up with the latest and greatest and even in some cases be entertained (looking at you Soft Skills Engineering!). Here my list of top 10 podcasts I listen to today in no particular order.*

*I subscribe to way more podcasts than this, but in the spirit of brevity I am cutting the list to 10.

Shoptalk Show

Dave Rupert, Chris Coyier

Front end focused show about design and development of modern websites. Dave and Chris are always worth listening whether they have a guests or not. In fact, their “rapid fire” episodes where they answer questions of their listeners are one of my favorites.

The React Podcast

Chantastic, Michael Jackson

You can probably guess what this show is about. That’s right, it is about VueJS (jk). Chantastic and Michael does a great job talking to a wide variety of guests directly or tangentially related to React ecosystem. In fact, they recently did a great episode with React core team about its future. It is a must for those of us who are in React world!

Track Changes

Paul Ford, Rich Ziade

Not strictly speaking development podcasts, however, it is one of my favorites. Paul (of What is Code fame) and Rich are co-founders of Postlight digital product studio in NYC. Their musings about current state of technology, weird rants about social media and ever so interesting guests makes it a delight to listen.

.NET Rocks

Carl Franklin, Richard Campbell

If you are in JS ecosystem, do not be put off by the title of the podcast. It is one of the longest running shows in town, focusing on all sides of technology. It can be a little Microsoft centric in terms of guests but it always delivers high quality content, great conversations and “geekouts” which delve deeply in a topic that expand your horizons. Carl and Richard are pros at what they do and other podcasts have a lot to learn from them.

The Changelog

Adam Stacoviak, Jerod Santo

What makes Changelog special is high production quality and excellent guests. Focusing mostly on Open Source, Adam and Jerod delivers every time. If you want to be in the know of what is going on in the industry I think this is a great way to do so. One of the recent episodes with Dominic Tarr (event-stream incident for those who do not know) was excellent.

Syntax

Scott Tolinski, Wes Bos

This is one of the youngest podcasts in the list. Scott and Wes covers JS ecosystem and latest and greatest technologies, frameworks, libraries, you name it. If you are familiar with their courses, you can expect the same quality work in this podcasts (watch out for those sick sponsor transitions by Scott).

Darknet Diaries

Jack Rhysider

Story driven podcast that dives into the “dark” side of tech. Jack delivers a great insight into data breaches, hacks and other malicious actors and actions of the cyber space. It is a great little gem of a podcast that I discovered fairly recently.

JS Party

Suz Hinton, Kevin Ball, Jerod Santo, Christopher Hiller, Safia Abdalla, others

Second entry from the Changelog family. JS Party is JS centric (duh!) podcast covering a lot of new and more mature technology. Show hosts are great and provide a good variety of opinions.

Front End Happy Hour

Ryan Burgess, Stacy London, Jem Young, Augustus Yuan

While Front End is in the name, hosts cover a lot more topics than that. There is a good balance of opinions and excellent guests. You get the feeling that hosts do come with a lot of experience in the industry and valuable insights.

Soft Skills Engineering

Dave Smith, Jamison Dance

This podcast is a delight, especially when jokes do not land that well, it still makes you giggle. Dave and Jamison focus on other aspects of development (salary negations, navigating company culture, dealing with coworkers and bosses, etc). Write-in questions give you an insight into how other companies operate and what other developers have troubles with.

JavaScript vs Python: Will Python Replace JavaScript popularity by 2020?

JavaScript vs Python: Will Python Replace JavaScript popularity by 2020?

JavaScript is currently the most commonly used programming language but now Python is dishing out some stiff competition. Python has been steadily increasing in popularity so much so that it is now the fastest-growing programming language. So will Python Replace JavaScript popularity by 2020?

This is the Clash of the Titans!!

And no…I am not talking about the Hollywood movie (don’t bother watching it…it’s horrible!). I am talking about JavaScript and Python, two of the most popular programming languages in existence today.

JavaScript is currently the most commonly used programming language (and has been for quite some time!) but now Python is dishing out some stiff competition. Python has been steadily increasing in popularity so much so that it is now the fastest-growing programming language. So now the question is…Will Python Replace JavaScript popularity by 2020?

To understand the above question correctly, it is important to know more about JavaScript and Python as well as the reasons for their popularity. So let’s start with JavaScript first!

Why is JavaScript so popular?

JavaScript is a high-level, interpreted programming language that is most popular as a scripting language for Web pages. This means that if a web page is not just sitting there and displaying static information, then JavaScript is probably behind that. And that’s not all, there are even advanced versions of the language such as Node.js which is used for server-side scripting.

JavaScript is an extremely popular language. And if my word doesn’t convince you, here are the facts!!!

According to StackOverflow Developer Survey Results 2019, JavaScript is the most commonly used programming language, used by 69.7 % of professional developers. And this is a title it has claimed the past seven years in a row.

In addition to that, the most commonly used Web Frameworks are jQuery, Angular.js and React.js (All of which incidentally use JavaScript). Now if that doesn’t demonstrate JavaScript’s popularity, what does?!

Image Source: Stackoverflow

So now the question arises…Why is JavaScript so popular?

Well, some of the reasons for that are:

  • JavaScript is used both on the client-side and the server-side. This means that it runs practically everywhere from browsers to powerful servers. This gives it an edge over other languages that are not so versatile.
  • JavaScript implements multiple paradigms ranging from OOP to procedural. This allows developers the freedom to experiment as they want.
  • JavaScript has a large community of enthusiasts that actively back the language. Without this, it would have been tough for JavaScript to establish the number one position it has.
Can Python Replace JavaScript in Popularity?

Python is an interpreted, general-purpose programming language that has multiple uses ranging from web applications to data analysis. This means that Python can be seen in complex websites such as YouTube or Instagram, in cloud computing projects such as OpenStack, in Machine Learning, etc. (basically everywhere!)

Python has been steadily increasing in popularity so much so that it is the fastest-growing major programming language today according to StackOverflow Developer Survey Results 2019.

This is further demonstrated by this Google Trends chart showing the growth of Python as compared to JavaScript over the last 5 years:

As shown in the above data, Python recorded increased search interest as compared to JavaScript for the first time around November 2017 and it has maintained its lead ever since. This shows remarkable growth in Python as compared to 5 years ago.

In fact, Stack Overflow created a model to forecast its future traffic based on a model called STL and guess what…the prediction is that Python could potentially stay in the lead against JavaScript till 2020 at the least.

Image Source : Stackoverflow

All these trends indicate that Python is extremely popular and getting even more popular with time. Some of the reasons for this incredible performance of Python are given as follows:

  • Python is Easy To Use
    No one likes excessively complicated things and that’s one of the reasons for the growing popularity of Python. It is simple with an easily readable syntax and that makes it well loved by both seasoned developers and experimental students. In addition to this, Python is also supremely efficient. It allows developers to complete more work using fewer lines of code. With all these advantages, what’s not to love?!!
  • Python has a Supportive Community
    Python has been around since 1990 and that is ample time to create a supportive community. Because of this support, Python learners can easily improve their knowledge, which only leads to increasing popularity. And that’s not all! There are many resources available online to promote Python, ranging from official documentation to YouTube tutorials that are a big help for learners.
  • Python has multiple Libraries and Frameworks
    Python is already quite popular and consequently, it has hundreds of different libraries and frameworks that can be used by developers. These libraries and frameworks are really useful in saving time which in turn makes Python even more popular. Some of the popular libraries of Python are NumPy and SciPy for scientific computing, Django for web development, BeautifulSoup for XML and HTML parsing, scikit-learn for machine learning applications, nltk for natural language processing, etc.
So What’s the Conclusion?

While JavaScript is currently the most popular programming language, Python could soon outstrip it of this title based on its incredible growth rate. So it is entirely possible that Python could be the most popular programming language by 2020.

However, this will merely impact the relative popularity of these two languages and not specify which among them is the better language. That choice is entirely subjective and may depend on multiple factors such as project requirements, scalability, ease of learning as well as the future growth prospects.

JavaScript vs Python : Can Python outperform JavaScript in the next five years?

JavaScript vs Python : Can Python outperform JavaScript in the next five years?

JavaScript and Python are two influential programming languages for building a wide range of applications. While JavaScript has been the dominant programming language for many years, Python’s fast-growth threatens to dethrone the widely popular technology.

JavaScript and Python are two influential programming languages for building a wide range of applications. While JavaScript has been the dominant programming language for many years, Python’s fast-growth threatens to dethrone the widely popular technology.

This is the Clash of the Titans!!

And no…I am not talking about the Hollywood movie (don’t bother watching it…it’s horrible!). I am talking about JavaScript** and **Python, two of the most popular programming languages in existence today.

JavaScript is currently the most commonly used programming language (and has been for quite some time!) but now Python is dishing out some stiff competition. Python has been steadily increasing in popularity so much so that it is now the fastest-growing programming language. So now the question is…Will Python Replace JavaScript popularity by 2020?

To understand the above question correctly, it is important to know more about JavaScript and Python as well as the reasons for their popularity. So let’s start with JavaScript first!

Why is JavaScript so popular?

JavaScript is a high-level, interpreted programming language that is most popular as a scripting language for Web pages. This means that if a web page is not just sitting there and displaying static information, then JavaScript is probably behind that. And that’s not all, there are even advanced versions of the language such as Node.js which is used for server-side scripting.

JavaScript is an extremely popular language. And if my word doesn’t convince you, here are the facts!!!

According to StackOverflow Developer Survey Results 2019, JavaScript is the most commonly used programming language, used by 69.7 % of professional developers. And this is a title it has claimed the past seven years in a row.

In addition to that, the most commonly used Web Frameworks are jQuery, Angular.js and React.js (All of which incidentally use JavaScript). Now if that doesn’t demonstrate JavaScript’s popularity, what does?!

Image Source: Stackoverflow

So now the question arises…Why is JavaScript so popular?

Well, some of the reasons for that are:
JavaScript is used both on the client-side and the server-side. This means that it runs practically everywhere from browsers to powerful servers. This gives it an edge over other languages that are not so versatile.JavaScript implements multiple paradigms ranging from OOP to procedural. This allows developers the freedom to experiment as they want.JavaScript has a large community of enthusiasts that actively back the language. Without this, it would have been tough for JavaScript to establish the number one position it has.

Can Python Replace JavaScript in Popularity?

Python is an interpreted, general-purpose programming language that has multiple uses ranging from web applications to data analysis. This means that Python can be seen in complex websites such as YouTube or Instagram, in cloud computing projects such as OpenStack, in Machine Learning, etc. (basically everywhere!)

Python has been steadily increasing in popularity so much so that it is the fastest-growing major programming language today according to StackOverflow Developer Survey Results 2019.

This is further demonstrated by this Google Trends chart showing the growth of Python as compared to JavaScript over the last 5 years:

As shown in the above data, Python recorded increased search interest as compared to JavaScript for the first time around November 2017 and it has maintained its lead ever since. This shows remarkable growth in Python as compared to 5 years ago.

In fact, Stack Overflow created a model to forecast its future traffic based on a model called STL and guess what…the prediction is that Python could potentially stay in the lead against JavaScript till 2020 at the least.

Image Source : Stackoverflow

All these trends indicate that Python is extremely popular and getting even more popular with time. Some of the reasons for this incredible performance of Python are given as follows:
Python is Easy To UseNo one likes excessively complicated things and that’s one of the reasons for the growing popularity of Python. It is simple with an easily readable syntax and that makes it well loved by both seasoned developers and experimental students. In addition to this, Python is also supremely efficient. It allows developers to complete more work using fewer lines of code. With all these advantages, what’s not to love?!!Python has a Supportive CommunityPython has been around since 1990 and that is ample time to create a supportive community. Because of this support, Python learners can easily improve their knowledge, which only leads to increasing popularity. And that’s not all! There are many resources available online to promote Python, ranging from official documentation to YouTube tutorials that are a big help for learners.Python has multiple Libraries and FrameworksPython is already quite popular and consequently, it has hundreds of different libraries and frameworks that can be used by developers. These libraries and frameworks are really useful in saving time which in turn makes Python even more popular. Some of the popular libraries of Python are NumPy and SciPy for scientific computing, Django for web development, BeautifulSoup for XML and HTML parsing, scikit-learn for machine learning applications, nltk for natural language processing, etc.## So What’s the Conclusion?

While JavaScript is currently the most popular programming language, Python could soon outstrip it of this title based on its incredible growth rate. So it is entirely possible that Python could be the most popular programming language by 2020.

However, this will merely impact the relative popularity of these two languages and not specify which among them is the better language. That choice is entirely subjective and may depend on multiple factors such as project requirements, scalability, ease of learning as well as the future growth prospects.