Desmond  Gerber

Desmond Gerber

1614049551

How to Add A Watermark To Your Video using Code

For anyone not interested in learning how to build an application that watermarks your videos and just wants a simple way to add a watermark to a video; this utility will do just that!

Watermarking first appeared in Italy during the 13th century, where paper manufacturers changed the thickness the paper whilst it was still wet. The watermarked part of the paper let through more light leading to a mark that allowed readers to identify where the paper was produced.

Today we use watermarks for a wide variety of applications, with the majority of watermarks now being off the digital variety. It provides for a clear, yet relatively unobtrusive way, to show original authorship. This is particularly important in the age of the internet where it is easy to copy and appropriate media without permission.

This guide has been written to show a quick and easy way to develop an application that can add watermarks to your videos using the Shotstack API. This API allows you to describe a video edit in JSON, and then use your favourite programming language to render thousands of videos concurrently in the cloud.

Let’s get started

Sign up for an API key

You’ll need to sign up for a free Shotstack developer account. After registering just log in to receive your API key.

The free version provides you with free use of the API, but does embed a small watermark into your video. You can get rid of this by adding in your payment information and using your production key.

We’ll be using  Node.js to build our application. No fancy routing, just the basics.

#node-js-tutorial #marketing-automation #video-editing

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

How to Add A Watermark To Your Video using Code
Tyrique  Littel

Tyrique Littel

1604008800

Static Code Analysis: What It Is? How to Use It?

Static code analysis refers to the technique of approximating the runtime behavior of a program. In other words, it is the process of predicting the output of a program without actually executing it.

Lately, however, the term “Static Code Analysis” is more commonly used to refer to one of the applications of this technique rather than the technique itself — program comprehension — understanding the program and detecting issues in it (anything from syntax errors to type mismatches, performance hogs likely bugs, security loopholes, etc.). This is the usage we’d be referring to throughout this post.

“The refinement of techniques for the prompt discovery of error serves as well as any other as a hallmark of what we mean by science.”

  • J. Robert Oppenheimer

Outline

We cover a lot of ground in this post. The aim is to build an understanding of static code analysis and to equip you with the basic theory, and the right tools so that you can write analyzers on your own.

We start our journey with laying down the essential parts of the pipeline which a compiler follows to understand what a piece of code does. We learn where to tap points in this pipeline to plug in our analyzers and extract meaningful information. In the latter half, we get our feet wet, and write four such static analyzers, completely from scratch, in Python.

Note that although the ideas here are discussed in light of Python, static code analyzers across all programming languages are carved out along similar lines. We chose Python because of the availability of an easy to use ast module, and wide adoption of the language itself.

How does it all work?

Before a computer can finally “understand” and execute a piece of code, it goes through a series of complicated transformations:

static analysis workflow

As you can see in the diagram (go ahead, zoom it!), the static analyzers feed on the output of these stages. To be able to better understand the static analysis techniques, let’s look at each of these steps in some more detail:

Scanning

The first thing that a compiler does when trying to understand a piece of code is to break it down into smaller chunks, also known as tokens. Tokens are akin to what words are in a language.

A token might consist of either a single character, like (, or literals (like integers, strings, e.g., 7Bob, etc.), or reserved keywords of that language (e.g, def in Python). Characters which do not contribute towards the semantics of a program, like trailing whitespace, comments, etc. are often discarded by the scanner.

Python provides the tokenize module in its standard library to let you play around with tokens:

Python

1

import io

2

import tokenize

3

4

code = b"color = input('Enter your favourite color: ')"

5

6

for token in tokenize.tokenize(io.BytesIO(code).readline):

7

    print(token)

Python

1

TokenInfo(type=62 (ENCODING),  string='utf-8')

2

TokenInfo(type=1  (NAME),      string='color')

3

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string='=')

4

TokenInfo(type=1  (NAME),      string='input')

5

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string='(')

6

TokenInfo(type=3  (STRING),    string="'Enter your favourite color: '")

7

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string=')')

8

TokenInfo(type=4  (NEWLINE),   string='')

9

TokenInfo(type=0  (ENDMARKER), string='')

(Note that for the sake of readability, I’ve omitted a few columns from the result above — metadata like starting index, ending index, a copy of the line on which a token occurs, etc.)

#code quality #code review #static analysis #static code analysis #code analysis #static analysis tools #code review tips #static code analyzer #static code analysis tool #static analyzer

matrix multiplication in python user input

Given two user input matrix. Our task is to display the addition of two matrix. In these problem we use nested List comprehensive.

matrix multiplication in python user input

Algorithm

Step1: input two matrix.

Step 2: nested for loops to iterate through each row and each column.

Step 3: take one resultant matrix which is initially contains all 0. Then we multiply each row elements of first matrix with each elements of second matrix, then add all multiplied value. That is the value of resultant matrix.

Example Code

# Program to multiply two matrices
A=[]
n=int(input("Enter N for N x N matrix: "))         
print("Enter the element ::>")
for i in range(n): 
   row=[]                                      #temporary list to store the row
   for j in range(n): 
      row.append(int(input()))           #add the input to row list
      A.append(row)                      #add the row to the list
print(A)
# [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]
#Display the 2D array
print("Display Array In Matrix Form")
for i in range(n):
   for j in range(n):
      print(A[i][j], end=" ")
   print()                                        #new line
B=[]
n=int(input("Enter N for N x N matrix : "))           #3 here
#use list for storing 2D array
#get the user input and store it in list (here IN : 1 to 9)
print("Enter the element ::>")
for i in range (n): 
   row=[]                                      #temporary list to store the row
   for j in range(n): 
      row.append(int(input()))           #add the input to row list
      B.append(row)                       #add the row to the list
print(B)
# [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]
#Display the 2D array
print("Display Array In Matrix Form")
for i in range(n):
   for j in range(n):
      print(B[i][j], end=" ")
   print()                                           
result = [[0,0,0], [0,0,0], [0,0,0]] 
for i in range(len(A)): 
   for j in range(len(B[0])): 
      for k in range(len(B)): 
         result[i][j] += A[i][k] * B[k][j] 
print("The Resultant Matrix Is ::>")
for r in result: 
   print(r) 

Output

Enter N for N x N matrix: 3
Enter the element ::>
2
1
4
2
1
2
3
4
3
[[2, 1, 4], [2, 1, 2], [3, 4, 3]]
Display Array In Matrix Form
2 1 4 
2 1 2 
3 4 3 
Enter N for N x N matrix : 3
Enter the element ::>
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]
Display Array In Matrix Form
1 2 3 
4 5 6 
7 8 9 
The Resultant Matrix Is ::>
[34, 41, 48]
[20, 25, 30]
[40, 50, 60]

https://www.pakainfo.com/python-program-multiplication-of-two-matrix-from-user-input/

The  NineHertz

The NineHertz

1630909606

How to Hire Video Game Developers For Video Game Development Company?

The gaming industry has taken a boom in the last few years. If we talk about numbers, according to NewZoo, the worth of the video gaming industry was $159.3 Billion in 2020. Video games are not just something for fun now, players and users expect much more from video game developers. Creating such products that just do not satisfy the player’s needs and exceed their expectations is what video game development company are thriving for.

Though kickstarting a new game-making studio is not an easy task. This business requires a team with a huge passion to create games and earn money from these video games. The idea of the approach is to create such unique games that will reach millions of people in the world and gain popularity. This growth demands more professionals in this field.

This just can not be obtained by finding someone with a good CV, the whole process includes a deep dig down to grab the right talent. Read on to learn more about Mobile game developers and the process of hiring video game developers.

Read Complete Blog Here -  https://theninehertz.com/blog/how-to-hire-video-game-developers-video-game-development


#Video Game Development

#Video Game developers

#Video game development studio

#Video game development services

 

Ricky Martin

Ricky Martin

1593056092

Top 6 Python Packages You Should be Using in Every Django Web App

There are countless Python packages easily added to any project. But there are some packages you can't help but use in every Django web app because they've proven to be extremely beneficial and time-saving.

We decided to focus on those packages, the ones you'll end up installing regularly, and explain the installation and configurations needed to get them up and running. 

While some Python packages offer cool functionality needed for one specific project, the packages discussed below are the bread-and-butter of the Django packages.

Django Web Framework

But we can't jump into Django packages by talking about the Django web framework.

A web framework is comprised of modules or packages that allow developers to quickly write web applications without having to handle the precise details of the protocol and other web app management.

Django is considered a full-stack web framework in which a database, application server, template engine, authentication module, and dispatcher are all neatly combined to create a high-level framework. These individual components are included upon package installation and often just need some minor configurations for them to function correctly. 

macOS Terminal

(env)User-Macbook:env user$ pip install django

Windows Command Prompt

(env)C:\Users\Owner\desktop\env> pip install django

At the time of this article, the latest version of Django is 3.0.8. To install the latest version, all you need is the command pip install django.

If you wish to install a different version, then specify the version number as demonstrated in the command pip install django==2.1.15. Please note that there are two equal signs after the package name, not one. 

Once the installation is complete, you will need to start configuring your Django web app with a project and an application. If you want to jump right into building your Django web app, check out the quick start guides to Django Installation and Django Configuration. Or if you are just getting started and need a step-by-step tutorial, see the Beginner's Guide to Django Web Apps

But we are here to talk about Python Packages meant for Django web apps, not basic Django configurations so we'll keep moving.

We have a lot to cover.

  1. Django TinyMCE4 Lite
  2. Pillow
  3. Django Crispy Forms
  4. Django Tables
  5. Django Filter
  6. Python Decouple

 


 

(1) Django TinyMCE4 Lite

macOS Terminal

(env)User-Macbook:mysite user$ pip install django-tinymce4-lite

Windows Command Prompt

(env) C:\Users\Owner\Desktop\Code\env\mysite>pip install django-tinymce4-lite

Once you have finished the basic configurations of your web app, you can install a cool Python package named django-tinymce4-lite. This package is actually a smaller version of the Django application django-tinymce4 that contains a widget to render Django form fields as TinyMCE editors.

TinyMCE is a WYSIWYG ("what you see is what you get") text editor that converts HTML elements into editor instances or "plain text".  This python package is highly recommended if you are looking to create a blog as you can easily edit text that is then formatted to HTML within the actual template.

 

env > mysite > mysite > settings.py

INSTALLED_APPS = [
    ...
    ...
    'tinymce',
]


TINYMCE_DEFAULT_CONFIG = {
    'height': 400,
    'width': 1000,
    'cleanup_on_startup': True,
    'custom_undo_redo_levels': 20,
    'selector': 'textarea',
    'browser_spellcheck': 'True',
    'theme': 'modern',
    'plugins': '''
            textcolor save link image media preview codesample contextmenu
            table code lists fullscreen  insertdatetime  nonbreaking
            contextmenu directionality searchreplace wordcount visualblocks
            visualchars code fullscreen autolink lists  charmap print  hr
            anchor pagebreak
            ''',
    'toolbar1': '''
            fullscreen preview bold italic underline | fontselect,
            fontsizeselect  | forecolor backcolor | alignleft alignright |
            aligncenter alignjustify | indent outdent | bullist numlist table |
            | link image media | codesample
            ''',
    'toolbar2': '''
            visualblocks visualchars |
            charmap hr pagebreak nonbreaking anchor |  code |
            ''',
    'contextmenu': 'formats | link image',
    'menubar': True,
    'statusbar': True,
    }

After installation, you will need to add tinymce to the list of installed apps in the settings file then add the default configurations below.  The default configurations define the height, weight, spellcheck, and toolbars. 

 

env > mysite > mysite > urls.py

"""mysite URL Configuration

The `urlpatterns` list routes URLs to views. For more information please see:
    https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/2.1/topics/http/urls/
Examples:
Function views
    1. Add an import:  from my_app import views
    2. Add a URL to urlpatterns:  path('', views.home, name='home')
Class-based views
    1. Add an import:  from other_app.views import Home
    2. Add a URL to urlpatterns:  path('', Home.as_view(), name='home')
Including another URLconf
    1. Import the include() function: from django.urls import include, path
    2. Add a URL to urlpatterns:  path('blog/', include('blog.urls'))
"""
from django.contrib import admin
from django.urls import path, include


urlpatterns = [
    path('admin/', admin.site.urls),
    path('', include ('main.urls')),
    path('tinymce/', include('tinymce.urls')), #add this

]

Then add the TinyMCE path to the project URLs.

 

env > mysite > main > models.py

from django.db import models
from tinymce import HTMLField

class MyModel(models.Model):
    ...
    content = HTMLField()

Finally, you can quickly add TinyMCE to the Django model by importing HTMLField at the top of the page then calling it in the model field. If you are unsure of how to use Django models, check out the article, How to use Django Models for more information. 

 


 

(2) Pillow

macOS Terminal

(env)User-Macbook:mysite user$ pip install Pillow

Windows Command Prompt

(env) C:\Users\Owner\Desktop\Code\env\mysite>pip install Pillow

So, this package is not specific to Django but is needed for image and file uploads to work correctly in a Django project.  If you are looking to have a media upload field in your Django model for let's say an article cover image, you need to install Pillow. It's a Python Imaging Library fork for uploading files correctly. 

 

env > mysite > mysite > settings.py

MEDIA_URL = '/media/'

MEDIA_ROOT = os.path.join(BASE_DIR, 'media')

Once installed, you need to add a media folder URL and ROOT directory to your settings file. 

 

env > mysite > mysite > urls.py

from django.contrib import admin
from django.urls import path, include
from django.conf import settings #add this
from django.conf.urls.static import static #add this

urlpatterns = [
    path('admin/', admin.site.urls),
    path('', include ('main.urls')),
]

if settings.DEBUG: #add this
    urlpatterns += static(settings.MEDIA_URL, document_root=settings.MEDIA_ROOT)

Then you need to add the necessary imports at the top of your project's URL file and specify the URL pattern to the media folder. Keep in mind that the media upload will not work in production given the if condition. You will need to reconfigure your media upload location when you are ready to deploy.

 

env > mysite > main > models.py

from django.db import models

class MyModel(models.Model):
    ...
    image = models.ImageField(upload_to='images/')

Now to upload an image, go to your models file and add an ImageField with the upload location as 'images/'. The uploaded images will then be added to a media  > images folder that will automatically be created upon the upload. 

For more information about correctly creating a model, accessing the upload location in the Django admin, and rendering the model in a template, refer to How to use Django Models.

 


 

(3) Django Crispy Forms

macOS Terminal

(env)User-Macbook:mysite user$ pip install django-crispy-forms

Windows Command Prompt

(env) C:\Users\Owner\desktop\code\env\mysite>pip install django-crispy-forms

Let's talk about Django forms. Their functionality is great but their appearance isn't the best. You can choose to install django-crispy-forms in your project to quickly solve this issue.

 

env > mysite > mysite > settings.py

INSTALLED_APPS = [
    ...
    'crispy_forms',
]

CRISPY_TEMPLATE_PACK = 'uni_form'

For it to function correctly, you will need to go to the settings file and add crispy_forms to the installed apps list. Keep in mind that there is an underscore between crispy and forms.

Then you need to specify the crispy template pack. The one listed below is the default but if you are using the Bootstrap CSS framework, check out how to integrate Bootstrap with django-crispy-forms

 

env > mysite > main > templates > main > contact.html

{% load crispy_forms_tags %}

<form method="post">
    {% csrf_token %}
       {{form|crispy}}
       <button type="submit">Submit</button>
</form>

The package django-crispy-forms is added to the project in the form of a filter added within the Django template language {{form}}. This format will not only call all of the form fields but also format each field according to the crispy form template pack specified in the settings.

Refer to the article Render Forms with Django Crispy Forms for more information regarding the form rendering process using crispy forms and the article Build a Django Contact Form with Email Backend for more general information on how to build a Django form. 

 


 

(4) Django Tables

macOS Terminal

(env)User-Macbook:mysite user$ pip install django-tables2

Windows Command Prompt

(env) C:\Users\Owner\desktop\code\env\mysite>pip install django-tables2

Now let's say you want to create a dynamic table in your Django project that connects to a model. Install django-tables2, a Django-specific package for table rendering.

 

env > mysite > mysite > settings.py

INSTALLED_APPS = [
    ...
    'django_tables2',
]

Add Django tables to the installed apps.

 

env > mysite > main > models.py

from django.db import models


class MyModel(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=100, verbose_name="full name")
    email = models.EmailField(max_length=200)

Then create the model you wish to use in the table.

After you have created the model, you will need to run the commands python manage.py makemigrations and python manage.py migrate to add the model to the database and add your model objects via the Django admin. For more instruction, see How to Use Django Models

 

env > mysite > main > (New File) tables.py

import django_tables2 as tables
from .models import MyModel

class MyTable(tables.Table):
    class Meta:
        model = MyModel
        fields = ("name", "email", )

 

Now, create a new file called tables.py in the application folder, main, and import tables from django_tables2 at the top of the file. Then create a class that specifies the model and field names. 

 

env > mysite > main > views.py (Class-based views)

...
from django_tables2 import SingleTableView

from .models import MyModel
from .tables import MyTable


class ListView(SingleTableView):
    model = MyModel
    table_class = MyTable
    template_name = 'main/table.html'

 

If you are looking to use class-based views, go to the views file and add the view class specifying the model, table, and template. Again, you will need to import the necessary variables from their appropriate files at the top of the file.

 

env > mysite > main > urls.py (Class-based views)

from django.urls import path
from . import views

app_name = "main"   


urlpatterns = [
     path("table", views.ListView.as_view()),
]

Then make sure there is a tables URL in the app urls.py file. If you are looking to learn more about class-based views, check out the article Django Class-based Views.

 

env > mysite > main > views.py (Function-based views)

...
from django_tables2 import SingleTableView

from .models import MyModel
from .tables import MyTable


def list(request):
	model = MyModel.objects.all()
	table = MyTable(model)
	return render(request=request, template_name="main/table.html", context={"model":model, "table":table})

 

Or you can choose to do function-based views in the views.py file. Either one will work, but the format is different. 

 

env > mysite > main > urls.py (Function-based views)

from django.urls import path
from . import views

app_name = "main"   


urlpatterns = [
    path("table", views.list, name="list"),
]

Then add the table URL in the app urls.py file. 

 

env > mysite > main > templates > main > (New File) table.html

{% load render_table from django_tables2 %}

<div>
    {% render_table table %}
</div>

With the views and URLs configured, you can render the table in the template by loading in render_table from django_tables2 at the top of the file then calling render_table and the context of the table passed in the view.

By default, the class-based view passes the table context as just table, and in the function-based view, we also chose to specify the context of the table as table

 

If you want to add Bootstrap CSS to the table:

env > mysite > main > tables.py

import django_tables2 as tables
from .models import MyModel

class MyTable(tables.Table):
    class Meta:
        model = MyModel
        template_name = "django_tables2/bootstrap4.html"
        fields = ("name", "email",)

 

Add a template name to the tables.py file connecting to the Bootstrap template. This and other template files can be found in the Lib > site-packages > django_tables2 > templates > django_tables2 folder of your project.

 

env > mysite > main > templates > main > (New File) table.html

{% extends "main/header.html" %}

{% block content %}

{% load render_table from django_tables2 %}

<div class="container">
    {% render_table table %}
</div>

{% endblock %}

Then you can extend to a header that loads in the Bootstrap CDNs. This is the easiest way of adding Bootstrap to all of your templates using the same piece of code.

If you are unsure of how to use the extends tag with the Bootstrap CDNs, check out the Django extends tag and block content section in the Beginner's Guide to Django Web Apps

 


 

(5) Django Filter

macOS Terminal

(env)User-Macbook:mysite user$  pip install django-filter

Windows Command Prompt

(env) C:\Users\Owner\desktop\code\env\mysite>  pip install django-filter

Now that you have a table, you probably want the ability to search for specific content within the rows and filter the table by its results. The django-filter package can easily be used on top of the django-tables2 package to accomplish this.

 

env > mysite > mysite > settings.py

INSTALLED_APPS = [
    ...
    'django_filters',
]

Add Django filters to the installed apps. Note that is django_filters not django_filter.

 

env > mysite > main > (New File) filters.py

import django_filters
from .models import MyModel


class MyFilter(django_filters.FilterSet):
	name = django_filters.CharFilter(lookup_expr='icontains')

	class Meta:
		model = MyModel
		fields = {'name', 'email'}

 

Now, create a new file called filters.py in the application folder, main, and import django_filters. Then list the model and the model fields you wish to filter by.

You can also choose to add django_filters.CharFilter to the class. In the example above, the filter displays any rows where the name column contains the query specified. 

You can also choose to do django_filters.CharFilter(lookup_expr='iexact') if you are looking to filter only by an exact query match.

 

env > mysite > main > views.py (Class-based views)

...
from django_tables2 import SingleTableMixin
from django_filters.views import FilterView

from .models import MyModel
from .tables import MyTable
from .filters import MyFilter


class ListView(SingleTableMixin, FilterView):
    model = MyModel
    table_class = MyTable
    template_name = 'main/table.html'
    filterset_class = MyFilter

 

Then for a class-based view, import FilterView from django_filters.views at the top of the file and change django_tables2 import from SingleTableView to SingleTableMixin. You will also need to import your custom filter from the filter.py file.

In the class view, ListView will now inherit SingleTableMixin and FilterView and list the filterset_class as the custom filter within it. 

 

env > mysite > main > templates > main > table.html

{% load render_table from django_tables2 %}

<div>
    <br>
    <form action="" method="GET">
        {{filter.form}}
        <button type="submit">Filter</button>
    </form>
    <br>
    {% render_table table %}
</div>

With class-based views, the URL will stay the same but you will need to add a form HTML element and the Django Template language calling the filter and the form within the template. You also need a submit button within the form to submit your filter queries. Nothing changes about the way the table renders.

 

env > mysite > main > views.py (Function-based views)

...
from django_tables2.views import SingleTableMixin
from django_filter import FilterView

from .models import MyModel
from .tables import MyTable


def list(request):
	model = MyModel.objects.all()
	filterset_class = MyFilter(request.GET, model)
	table = MyTable(filterset_class.qs)
	return render(request=request, template_name="main/table.html", context={"model":model, "table":table, "filterset_class":filterset_class})

 

If using function-based views, make the same imports and the class-based views, then create an instance of the MyFilter class and pass in a GET request and model as arguments. Pass in the filterset_class as a queryset argument in the table then lists the filterset_class as context in the return render. 

 

env > mysite > main > templates > main > table.html

{% load render_table from django_tables2 %}

<div>
    <br>
    <form action="" method="GET">
        {{filterset_class.form}}
        <button type="submit">Filter</button>
    </form>
    <br>
    {% render_table table %}
</div>

With function-based views, you will need to specify the filterset_class, or the context declared, as the filter on the form. Everything else is the same format as the class-based template.

If you are looking to style the form, either scroll back up to the Django Crispy Forms section or click at the article mentioned earlier, Render Forms with Django Crispy Forms.

 


 

(6) Python Decouple

macOS Terminal

(env)User-Macbook:mysite user$ pip install python-decouple

Windows Command Prompt

(env) C:\Users\Owner\desktop\code\env\mysite> pip install python-decouple

The last and arguably most important Python package we will discuss is python-decouple. This package hides your sensitive configuration keys and information from hackers. It was created for Django but it is now considered a "generic tool" for separating configuration settings.

 

env > mysite > (New File) .env

SECRET_KEY =sdjioerb43buobnodhioh4i34hgip
DEBUG =True

env > mysite > mysite > settings.py

from decouple import config

SECRET_KEY = config('SECRET_KEY')
DEBUG = config('DEBUG', cast=bool)

Create a new file named .env in the project folder then import config in the settings.py file. Then transfer all of the configuration settings and variables you wish to hide to the .env file and call each variable using the python-decouple format of config('variable').

#programming #django #python

Stuti .

Stuti .

1624862078

Top 10 Video Calling & Conferencing APIs & SDKs { july 2022 }

Top Video Calling API & SDK and Video Conferencing API & SDK for Developers are integrated and embeddable video calling API, and programmable live video Conferencing API, in just a few lines of code.

video calling api

A video calling feature can be easily integrated into any existing application, allowing to leverage the functionality in order to improve productivity. This is a great idea for saving money and development time. To do so all we need to do is integrate the API or SDK for video calling into the existing software.

In the rapidly modernizing world, technology has advanced in a hurtle. The use of mobile gadgets has surged a lot. The world is growing digital and everything is accessible from a single place. In the company of modernization, there is a huge increase in digitalization. Virtual communication has been nowadays an important tool to keep up with people. Due to virtual video communication, we can today talk face-to-face overseas too. Such a great invention to make work easy.

Many companies work on the aspect of virtual communication. The video calls we do to communicate with our clients, corporates, and family are developed with the help of Software Development Kits (SDKs). Companies align with competition and design their SDKs to support their video calling applications and websites. These days conferencing has become so efficient without any lags or errors or issues. This is just because of the effective product delivery of the companies who have landed themselves to make an effective approach towards real-time communication.

What is Video Calling API?

Video Calling API are app development kits that complement apps that support video calling features on their applications to connect their customers with the community. These SDKs are developed by companies with their effective creative SDK ideas, built with interfaces designed in a lucrative way to make them attract users.

The rise in remote working has also led to a rise in video conferencing in companies in both internal and external environments. To detail a video SDK, let us understand the significance to develop a clear idea of how SDK works. Video conferencing is considered to be one of the most important tools for business considering the pandemic situation, video SDK makes it efficient.

Video Calling API makes efficient use of resources. It helps to lower the costs in many direct and indirect ways. The tangible costs are cut. The designed SDKs help in eliminating costs with their integrated functions.

Video Calling  API helps in faster delivery, saving a lot of time. They help in creating video conferences for businesses with their integrated.

Video Calling  API are a stable platform build-up for apps with video conferencing. They make video conferencing flexible and accessible from any place and any time.

Video SDK allows conferencing on a large scale helping businesses achieve their desired objectives.

Video conferencing has become significant over time and for that reason, a strong SDK build-up is now an urge for each company. Being the product providers, the companies who build these SDKs look to deliver all their innovations in it so that the end customer finds it very much involved and attractive. An ideal Video SDK must have these features.

Video conferencing

The very basic feature a Video SDK must have is an effective video conferencing interface. It must be compatible for one-to-one communication as well as communication on a mass scale. This is the foremost feature to address while choosing a video-conferencing application.

Real-time chats and messaging

A video conferencing application must be designed to provide real-time chats in an ongoing meeting. This helps to supplement clarity during the meeting virtually, through multimedia channels.

Audio and video recording

In an ideal video conferencing, the users generally believe to have a backup of that communication for the future. This is the top-notch requirement for a company to build up a stable domain.

Sharing the screen

A screen share enables viewing access to the participants of the meeting, developing a clear perspective of ideas thought to the ideas delivered.
Push notifications
An attractive Video SDK must support enabling notifications while the conference to make discussions acknowledged at the right time. This helps in running a business conference smoothly.

Effective flexibility and scalability

A video SDK must provide effective scalability so that it can be addressed with any supportive device without a screen of less clarity. It must be flexible enough to support all the devices for its accessibility.
In the market of real-time communication, various companies offer customizable video SDK interfaces for their clients. Due to the current pandemic situation, the real-time communication industry has increased a lot. People have made virtual communication as the most used method to communicate, rather it is their professional or personal life. Many companies have launched their Video SDKs with customizable features.

Here are Top 10  Video Calling APIs & SDKs Provider Choose India, US, Canada

1. Video SDK Embed Live Video Calling & Conferencing API & SDK 

Video SDK is a web-RTC company that looks into creating lucrative Video SDKs and APIs for their clients. It looks for better engagement of their clients by supporting them with providing the best products for the end-users. Video SDK production, delivering sub 100ms to 150ms low latency streaming in the real-time community creating its image as the ideal platform for video conferencing due to its flexible and scalable SDKs. They aim at delivering some of the best experiences to their clients with their customizable SDKs.

2. ZujoNow Live Video Calling Solution for Business Collaboration

Zujonow is a company that develops its product on cutting-edge technologies. It delivers products for its clients based on video conferencing with effective scalability and customizable SDKs. They also deal in products like live streaming, on-demand videos, and real-time communication. Zujonow work is a well-crafted platform for education and other related industries.

3. EnableX Live Video Calling API for Web & App

EnableX works on the development of communication APIs. it focuses on communication solutions and provides services in real-time communication for its clients. It delivers its products with SMS and chat interfaces too. EnableX works on developing educational APIs for students and also maintaining portfolios.

4. Daily.co Powerful Live Video Calling API

Daily.co is a real-time audio and video API developer, working on focusing on the best scalable video conferencing api for its clients. Daily.co works on developing global infrastructure delivering the best call quality on a timely basis, considering their web-RTC to be a source of service to the clients.

5. Eyeson Live Video Calling Solution for Business Collaboration

Eyeson masters into high-performing API including managed hosting and scaling for web-based business workflows on any device. It has a patented single Stream Technology merges any live media, data and participants in real-time into a single video and audio stream. The cloud services at eyeson can immediately be used for world wide scaling. It provides a world-class facility for its clients with guaranteed privacy.

6. Agora  Live video calling api

Agora.io is a web real-time communication company that develops SDKs and APIs. It works on engagement for the users by real-time voice, video call javascript  messaging, and live streaming products. They also have set up classrooms for students for learning with an interactive whiteboard.

7. Twilio cloud-based Live Video Calling APIs and SDK

Twilio develops video applications that are fully customizable, scalable, and flexible for usage. It constructs applications and connectivity and has its build-up. It makes channels for video, chats, and programmable chats. Twilio also looks at SMS build-up for its clients. It provides solutions based on real-time communication and scalability and video calling api 

8. PubNub Live Video Calling and Realtime Communication Platform

Pubnub is an in-app chat for real-time chat engagement. It retains full control, functionality, and customization without the time and expense of building in-house. It provides outsourcing to clients with the products like custom chat, effortless scalability, in-class integrations, and Chat UI support. They have a strong research window that looks for developing APIs for their clients.

9. Cometchat  Live Video Calling api Provider

Cometchat is designed for providing APIs and SDKs for various solutions for ed-tech, healthcare, dating, and social community. It is also devised for on-demand videos and live streaming. It allows its users to customize their Whitelabel as per their needs to make it feel like ownership. Cometchat is adaptive to all languages and has effective work data too.

10. Sinch  WebRTC- Live Video Conferencing API Solution

Sinch works on managing different APIs for messaging and calling. It puts forward the products for video calling, voice calls, SMS verification, and other engagement platforms. It provides solutions to different industries like health, retail, telecommunications, media and entertainment, and more. It provided operators opportunities for monetizing wholesale, preventing fraud, and other activities.

11. Apphitect  video and chat calling api

Apphitect focuses on mobile app development for android and iOS. It also engages its clients with different solutions concerning messaging. Apphitect delivers app testings and mobile. It develops everything from wireframe to pixel. Apphitact is currently working in 40+ cities with its headquarters in UAE.

12. Vidyo audio and Live Video Calling API providers

Vidyo provides solutions to services like Branding and white-labeling and hybrid cloud expansion. It also works with solutions for deployment services and project management services. It works for several industries like health, education, government, finance, retail; and more. It promotes connectivity and engagement for the users and also focuses on video conferencing systems for businesses.

 

 

Due to the current pandemic, real-time communication has took a massive hype for its flexible availability. All the businesses, corporates, schools, and organisations had to run over the web. Even earlier video conferencing was an all time favorable option for corporates to abide with communicating with clients, over a distance. But in the latter period, recently, the whole world has become dependent on it. For the same cause, it led to emergence of various innovative ideas for bringing people closer together even at a distance. Video conferencing has today become vital and above all it is appreciable for the companies who have invested in bringing up ideas by developing customisable video SDKs for their clients to promote belongingness. The APIs and SDKs designed by the companies have made it easier to use by the end consumers too. Overall, video conferencing makes work flexible and accessible to all, making itself categorise into an principal element of businesses.

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