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How To Get Started With Fastify and Next.js using a TypeScript Custom Server

If you’re wanting all the greatness of Next.js without having to deploy on the Vercel platform then look no further, use a custom server with Fastify! 3 main reasons why this is worth it:

  • Use the backend systems you know - ie Fastify - no having to learn how serverless works or how Next.js handles it’s backend API requests in a specific way

  • Keep full access to realtime features - server side events, websockets, socket.io, etc!

  • Don’t get tied to a separate platform when you really want to use Next.js for your next project. Using a Fastify custom server you can containerize your app and be on your way!

Github Repo with working example:

https://github.com/wolfejw86/blog-exa…

Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/JayWolfe/featured

#react #typescript #fastify

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

How To Get Started With Fastify and Next.js using a TypeScript Custom Server
Shubham Ankit

Shubham Ankit

1657081614

How to Automate Excel with Python | Python Excel Tutorial (OpenPyXL)

How to Automate Excel with Python

In this article, We will show how we can use python to automate Excel . A useful Python library is Openpyxl which we will learn to do Excel Automation

What is OPENPYXL

Openpyxl is a Python library that is used to read from an Excel file or write to an Excel file. Data scientists use Openpyxl for data analysis, data copying, data mining, drawing charts, styling sheets, adding formulas, and more.

Workbook: A spreadsheet is represented as a workbook in openpyxl. A workbook consists of one or more sheets.

Sheet: A sheet is a single page composed of cells for organizing data.

Cell: The intersection of a row and a column is called a cell. Usually represented by A1, B5, etc.

Row: A row is a horizontal line represented by a number (1,2, etc.).

Column: A column is a vertical line represented by a capital letter (A, B, etc.).

Openpyxl can be installed using the pip command and it is recommended to install it in a virtual environment.

pip install openpyxl

CREATE A NEW WORKBOOK

We start by creating a new spreadsheet, which is called a workbook in Openpyxl. We import the workbook module from Openpyxl and use the function Workbook() which creates a new workbook.

from openpyxl
import Workbook
#creates a new workbook
wb = Workbook()
#Gets the first active worksheet
ws = wb.active
#creating new worksheets by using the create_sheet method

ws1 = wb.create_sheet("sheet1", 0) #inserts at first position
ws2 = wb.create_sheet("sheet2") #inserts at last position
ws3 = wb.create_sheet("sheet3", -1) #inserts at penultimate position

#Renaming the sheet
ws.title = "Example"

#save the workbook
wb.save(filename = "example.xlsx")

READING DATA FROM WORKBOOK

We load the file using the function load_Workbook() which takes the filename as an argument. The file must be saved in the same working directory.

#loading a workbook
wb = openpyxl.load_workbook("example.xlsx")

 

GETTING SHEETS FROM THE LOADED WORKBOOK

 

#getting sheet names
wb.sheetnames
result = ['sheet1', 'Sheet', 'sheet3', 'sheet2']

#getting a particular sheet
sheet1 = wb["sheet2"]

#getting sheet title
sheet1.title
result = 'sheet2'

#Getting the active sheet
sheetactive = wb.active
result = 'sheet1'

 

ACCESSING CELLS AND CELL VALUES

 

#get a cell from the sheet
sheet1["A1"] <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.A1 >

  #get the cell value
ws["A1"].value 'Segment'

#accessing cell using row and column and assigning a value
d = ws.cell(row = 4, column = 2, value = 10)
d.value
10

 

ITERATING THROUGH ROWS AND COLUMNS

 

#looping through each row and column
for x in range(1, 5):
  for y in range(1, 5):
  print(x, y, ws.cell(row = x, column = y)
    .value)

#getting the highest row number
ws.max_row
701

#getting the highest column number
ws.max_column
19

There are two functions for iterating through rows and columns.

Iter_rows() => returns the rows
Iter_cols() => returns the columns {
  min_row = 4, max_row = 5, min_col = 2, max_col = 5
} => This can be used to set the boundaries
for any iteration.

Example:

#iterating rows
for row in ws.iter_rows(min_row = 2, max_col = 3, max_row = 3):
  for cell in row:
  print(cell) <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.A2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.B2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.C2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.A3 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.B3 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.C3 >

  #iterating columns
for col in ws.iter_cols(min_row = 2, max_col = 3, max_row = 3):
  for cell in col:
  print(cell) <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.A2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.A3 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.B2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.B3 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.C2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.C3 >

To get all the rows of the worksheet we use the method worksheet.rows and to get all the columns of the worksheet we use the method worksheet.columns. Similarly, to iterate only through the values we use the method worksheet.values.


Example:

for row in ws.values:
  for value in row:
  print(value)

 

WRITING DATA TO AN EXCEL FILE

Writing to a workbook can be done in many ways such as adding a formula, adding charts, images, updating cell values, inserting rows and columns, etc… We will discuss each of these with an example.

 

CREATING AND SAVING A NEW WORKBOOK

 

#creates a new workbook
wb = openpyxl.Workbook()

#saving the workbook
wb.save("new.xlsx")

 

ADDING AND REMOVING SHEETS

 

#creating a new sheet
ws1 = wb.create_sheet(title = "sheet 2")

#creating a new sheet at index 0
ws2 = wb.create_sheet(index = 0, title = "sheet 0")

#checking the sheet names
wb.sheetnames['sheet 0', 'Sheet', 'sheet 2']

#deleting a sheet
del wb['sheet 0']

#checking sheetnames
wb.sheetnames['Sheet', 'sheet 2']

 

ADDING CELL VALUES

 

#checking the sheet value
ws['B2'].value
null

#adding value to cell
ws['B2'] = 367

#checking value
ws['B2'].value
367

 

ADDING FORMULAS

 

We often require formulas to be included in our Excel datasheet. We can easily add formulas using the Openpyxl module just like you add values to a cell.
 

For example:

import openpyxl
from openpyxl
import Workbook

wb = openpyxl.load_workbook("new1.xlsx")
ws = wb['Sheet']

ws['A9'] = '=SUM(A2:A8)'

wb.save("new2.xlsx")

The above program will add the formula (=SUM(A2:A8)) in cell A9. The result will be as below.

image

 

MERGE/UNMERGE CELLS

Two or more cells can be merged to a rectangular area using the method merge_cells(), and similarly, they can be unmerged using the method unmerge_cells().

For example:
Merge cells

#merge cells B2 to C9
ws.merge_cells('B2:C9')
ws['B2'] = "Merged cells"

Adding the above code to the previous example will merge cells as below.

image

UNMERGE CELLS

 

#unmerge cells B2 to C9
ws.unmerge_cells('B2:C9')

The above code will unmerge cells from B2 to C9.

INSERTING AN IMAGE

To insert an image we import the image function from the module openpyxl.drawing.image. We then load our image and add it to the cell as shown in the below example.

Example:

import openpyxl
from openpyxl
import Workbook
from openpyxl.drawing.image
import Image

wb = openpyxl.load_workbook("new1.xlsx")
ws = wb['Sheet']
#loading the image(should be in same folder)
img = Image('logo.png')
ws['A1'] = "Adding image"
#adjusting size
img.height = 130
img.width = 200
#adding img to cell A3

ws.add_image(img, 'A3')

wb.save("new2.xlsx")

Result:

image

CREATING CHARTS

Charts are essential to show a visualization of data. We can create charts from Excel data using the Openpyxl module chart. Different forms of charts such as line charts, bar charts, 3D line charts, etc., can be created. We need to create a reference that contains the data to be used for the chart, which is nothing but a selection of cells (rows and columns). I am using sample data to create a 3D bar chart in the below example:

Example

import openpyxl
from openpyxl
import Workbook
from openpyxl.chart
import BarChart3D, Reference, series

wb = openpyxl.load_workbook("example.xlsx")
ws = wb.active

values = Reference(ws, min_col = 3, min_row = 2, max_col = 3, max_row = 40)
chart = BarChart3D()
chart.add_data(values)
ws.add_chart(chart, "E3")
wb.save("MyChart.xlsx")

Result
image


How to Automate Excel with Python with Video Tutorial

Welcome to another video! In this video, We will cover how we can use python to automate Excel. I'll be going over everything from creating workbooks to accessing individual cells and stylizing cells. There is a ton of things that you can do with Excel but I'll just be covering the core/base things in OpenPyXl.

⭐️ Timestamps ⭐️
00:00 | Introduction
02:14 | Installing openpyxl
03:19 | Testing Installation
04:25 | Loading an Existing Workbook
06:46 | Accessing Worksheets
07:37 | Accessing Cell Values
08:58 | Saving Workbooks
09:52 | Creating, Listing and Changing Sheets
11:50 | Creating a New Workbook
12:39 | Adding/Appending Rows
14:26 | Accessing Multiple Cells
20:46 | Merging Cells
22:27 | Inserting and Deleting Rows
23:35 | Inserting and Deleting Columns
24:48 | Copying and Moving Cells
26:06 | Practical Example, Formulas & Cell Styling

📄 Resources 📄
OpenPyXL Docs: https://openpyxl.readthedocs.io/en/stable/ 
Code Written in This Tutorial: https://github.com/techwithtim/ExcelPythonTutorial 
Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/TechWithTim/featured 

#python 

NBB: Ad-hoc CLJS Scripting on Node.js

Nbb

Not babashka. Node.js babashka!?

Ad-hoc CLJS scripting on Node.js.

Status

Experimental. Please report issues here.

Goals and features

Nbb's main goal is to make it easy to get started with ad hoc CLJS scripting on Node.js.

Additional goals and features are:

  • Fast startup without relying on a custom version of Node.js.
  • Small artifact (current size is around 1.2MB).
  • First class macros.
  • Support building small TUI apps using Reagent.
  • Complement babashka with libraries from the Node.js ecosystem.

Requirements

Nbb requires Node.js v12 or newer.

How does this tool work?

CLJS code is evaluated through SCI, the same interpreter that powers babashka. Because SCI works with advanced compilation, the bundle size, especially when combined with other dependencies, is smaller than what you get with self-hosted CLJS. That makes startup faster. The trade-off is that execution is less performant and that only a subset of CLJS is available (e.g. no deftype, yet).

Usage

Install nbb from NPM:

$ npm install nbb -g

Omit -g for a local install.

Try out an expression:

$ nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'
6

And then install some other NPM libraries to use in the script. E.g.:

$ npm install csv-parse shelljs zx

Create a script which uses the NPM libraries:

(ns script
  (:require ["csv-parse/lib/sync$default" :as csv-parse]
            ["fs" :as fs]
            ["path" :as path]
            ["shelljs$default" :as sh]
            ["term-size$default" :as term-size]
            ["zx$default" :as zx]
            ["zx$fs" :as zxfs]
            [nbb.core :refer [*file*]]))

(prn (path/resolve "."))

(prn (term-size))

(println (count (str (fs/readFileSync *file*))))

(prn (sh/ls "."))

(prn (csv-parse "foo,bar"))

(prn (zxfs/existsSync *file*))

(zx/$ #js ["ls"])

Call the script:

$ nbb script.cljs
"/private/tmp/test-script"
#js {:columns 216, :rows 47}
510
#js ["node_modules" "package-lock.json" "package.json" "script.cljs"]
#js [#js ["foo" "bar"]]
true
$ ls
node_modules
package-lock.json
package.json
script.cljs

Macros

Nbb has first class support for macros: you can define them right inside your .cljs file, like you are used to from JVM Clojure. Consider the plet macro to make working with promises more palatable:

(defmacro plet
  [bindings & body]
  (let [binding-pairs (reverse (partition 2 bindings))
        body (cons 'do body)]
    (reduce (fn [body [sym expr]]
              (let [expr (list '.resolve 'js/Promise expr)]
                (list '.then expr (list 'clojure.core/fn (vector sym)
                                        body))))
            body
            binding-pairs)))

Using this macro we can look async code more like sync code. Consider this puppeteer example:

(-> (.launch puppeteer)
      (.then (fn [browser]
               (-> (.newPage browser)
                   (.then (fn [page]
                            (-> (.goto page "https://clojure.org")
                                (.then #(.screenshot page #js{:path "screenshot.png"}))
                                (.catch #(js/console.log %))
                                (.then #(.close browser)))))))))

Using plet this becomes:

(plet [browser (.launch puppeteer)
       page (.newPage browser)
       _ (.goto page "https://clojure.org")
       _ (-> (.screenshot page #js{:path "screenshot.png"})
             (.catch #(js/console.log %)))]
      (.close browser))

See the puppeteer example for the full code.

Since v0.0.36, nbb includes promesa which is a library to deal with promises. The above plet macro is similar to promesa.core/let.

Startup time

$ time nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'
6
nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'   0.17s  user 0.02s system 109% cpu 0.168 total

The baseline startup time for a script is about 170ms seconds on my laptop. When invoked via npx this adds another 300ms or so, so for faster startup, either use a globally installed nbb or use $(npm bin)/nbb script.cljs to bypass npx.

Dependencies

NPM dependencies

Nbb does not depend on any NPM dependencies. All NPM libraries loaded by a script are resolved relative to that script. When using the Reagent module, React is resolved in the same way as any other NPM library.

Classpath

To load .cljs files from local paths or dependencies, you can use the --classpath argument. The current dir is added to the classpath automatically. So if there is a file foo/bar.cljs relative to your current dir, then you can load it via (:require [foo.bar :as fb]). Note that nbb uses the same naming conventions for namespaces and directories as other Clojure tools: foo-bar in the namespace name becomes foo_bar in the directory name.

To load dependencies from the Clojure ecosystem, you can use the Clojure CLI or babashka to download them and produce a classpath:

$ classpath="$(clojure -A:nbb -Spath -Sdeps '{:aliases {:nbb {:replace-deps {com.github.seancorfield/honeysql {:git/tag "v2.0.0-rc5" :git/sha "01c3a55"}}}}}')"

and then feed it to the --classpath argument:

$ nbb --classpath "$classpath" -e "(require '[honey.sql :as sql]) (sql/format {:select :foo :from :bar :where [:= :baz 2]})"
["SELECT foo FROM bar WHERE baz = ?" 2]

Currently nbb only reads from directories, not jar files, so you are encouraged to use git libs. Support for .jar files will be added later.

Current file

The name of the file that is currently being executed is available via nbb.core/*file* or on the metadata of vars:

(ns foo
  (:require [nbb.core :refer [*file*]]))

(prn *file*) ;; "/private/tmp/foo.cljs"

(defn f [])
(prn (:file (meta #'f))) ;; "/private/tmp/foo.cljs"

Reagent

Nbb includes reagent.core which will be lazily loaded when required. You can use this together with ink to create a TUI application:

$ npm install ink

ink-demo.cljs:

(ns ink-demo
  (:require ["ink" :refer [render Text]]
            [reagent.core :as r]))

(defonce state (r/atom 0))

(doseq [n (range 1 11)]
  (js/setTimeout #(swap! state inc) (* n 500)))

(defn hello []
  [:> Text {:color "green"} "Hello, world! " @state])

(render (r/as-element [hello]))

Promesa

Working with callbacks and promises can become tedious. Since nbb v0.0.36 the promesa.core namespace is included with the let and do! macros. An example:

(ns prom
  (:require [promesa.core :as p]))

(defn sleep [ms]
  (js/Promise.
   (fn [resolve _]
     (js/setTimeout resolve ms))))

(defn do-stuff
  []
  (p/do!
   (println "Doing stuff which takes a while")
   (sleep 1000)
   1))

(p/let [a (do-stuff)
        b (inc a)
        c (do-stuff)
        d (+ b c)]
  (prn d))
$ nbb prom.cljs
Doing stuff which takes a while
Doing stuff which takes a while
3

Also see API docs.

Js-interop

Since nbb v0.0.75 applied-science/js-interop is available:

(ns example
  (:require [applied-science.js-interop :as j]))

(def o (j/lit {:a 1 :b 2 :c {:d 1}}))

(prn (j/select-keys o [:a :b])) ;; #js {:a 1, :b 2}
(prn (j/get-in o [:c :d])) ;; 1

Most of this library is supported in nbb, except the following:

  • destructuring using :syms
  • property access using .-x notation. In nbb, you must use keywords.

See the example of what is currently supported.

Examples

See the examples directory for small examples.

Also check out these projects built with nbb:

API

See API documentation.

Migrating to shadow-cljs

See this gist on how to convert an nbb script or project to shadow-cljs.

Build

Prequisites:

  • babashka >= 0.4.0
  • Clojure CLI >= 1.10.3.933
  • Node.js 16.5.0 (lower version may work, but this is the one I used to build)

To build:

  • Clone and cd into this repo
  • bb release

Run bb tasks for more project-related tasks.

Download Details:
Author: borkdude
Download Link: Download The Source Code
Official Website: https://github.com/borkdude/nbb 
License: EPL-1.0

#node #javascript

Build a GraphQL app in Node.js with TypeScript and graphql-request

In this article, you will build a full-stack app using GraphQL and Node.js in the backend. Meanwhile, our frontend will use the graphql-request library to perform network operations on our backend.

Why use graphql-request and TypeScript?

Whenever developers build a GraphQL server using Apollo, the library generates a “frontend” which looks like so:

Frontend Developed By GraphQL And Apollo

This interface allows users to make query or mutation requests to the server via code. However, let’s address the elephant in the room: it doesn’t look very user friendly. Since the frontend doesn’t feature any buttons or any helpful interface elements, it might be hard for many users to navigate around your app. Consequently, this shrinks your user base. So how do we solve this problem?

This is where graphql-request comes in. It is an open source library which lets users perform queries on a GraphQL server. It boasts the following features:

  • Lightweight — This library is just over 21 kilobytes minified, which ensures your app stays performant
  • Promise-based API — This brings in support for asynchronous applications
  • TypeScript support — graphql-request is one of many libraries which allows for TypeScript. One major advantage of Typescript is that it allows for stable and predictable code

For example, look at the following program:

let myNumber = 9; //here, myNumber is an integer
myNumber = 'hello'; //now it is a string.
myNumber = myNumber + 10; //even though we are adding a string to an integer,
//JavaScript won't return an error. In the real world, it might bring unexpected outputs.
//However, in Typescript, we can tell the compiler..
//what data types we need to choose.
let myNumber:number = 39; //tell TS that we want to declare an integer.
myNumber = 9+'hello'; //returns an error. Therefore, it's easier to debug the program
//this promises stability and security. 

In this article, we will build a full-stack app using GraphQL and TypeScript. Here, we will use the apollo-server-express package to build a backend server. Furthermore, for the frontend, we will use Next and graphql-request to consume our GraphQL API.

Building our server

Project initialization

To initialize a blank Node.js project, run these terminal commands:

mkdir graphql-ts-tutorial #create project folder 
cd graphql-ts-tutorial 
npm init -y #initialize the app

When that’s done, we now have to tell Node that we need to use TypeScript in our codebase:

#configure our Typescript:
npx tsc --init --rootDir app --outDir dist --esModuleInterop --resolveJsonModule --lib es6 --module commonjs --allowJs true --noImplicitAny true
mkdir app #our main code folder
mkdir dist #Typescript will use this folder to compile our program.

Next, install these dependencies:

#development dependencies. Will tell Node that we will use Typescript
npm install -d ts-node @types/node typescript @types/express nodemon
#Installing Apollo Server and its associated modules. Will help us build our GraphQL
#server
npm install apollo-server-express apollo-server-core express graphql

After this step, navigate to your app folder. Here, create the following files:

  • index.ts: Our main file. This will execute and run our Express GraphQL server
  • dataset.ts: This will serve as our database, which will be served to the client
  • Resolvers.ts: This module will handle user commands. We will learn about resolvers later in this article
  • Schema.ts: As the name suggests, this file will store the schematics needed to send data to the client

In the end, your folder structure should look like so:

Folder Structure

Creating our database

In this section, we will create a dummy database which will be used to send requested data. To do so, go to app/dataset.ts and write the following code:

let people: { id: number; name: string }[] = [
  { id: 1, name: "Cassie" },
  { id: 2, name: "Rue" },
  { id: 3, name: "Lexi" },
];
export default people;
  • First, we created an array of objects called people
  • This array will have two fields: id of type number, and name of type string

Defining our schema

Here, we will now create a schema for our GraphQL server.

To put it simply, a GraphQL schema is a description of the dataset that clients can request from an API. This concept is similar to that of the Mongoose library.
To build a schema, navigate to the app/Schema.ts file. There, write the following code:

import { gql } from "apollo-server-express"; //will create a schema
const Schema = gql`
  type Person {
    id: ID!
    name: String
  }
  #handle user commands
  type Query {
    getAllPeople: [Person] #will return multiple Person instances
    getPerson(id: Int): Person #has an argument of 'id` of type Integer.
  }
`;
export default Schema; 
//export this Schema so we can use it in our project

Let’s break down this code piece by piece:

  • The Schema variable contains our GraphQL schema
  • First, we created a Person schema. It will have two fields: id of type ID and name of type String
  • Later on, we instructed GraphQL that if the client runs the getAllPeople command, the server will return an array of Person objects
  • Furthermore, if the user uses the getPerson command, GraphQL will return a single Person instance

Creating resolvers

Now that we have coded our schema, our next step is to define our resolvers.
In simple terms, a resolver is a group of functions that generate response for a GraphQL query. In other words, a resolver serves as a GraphQL query handler.
In Resolvers.ts, write the following code:

import people from "./dataset"; //get all of the available data from our database.
const Resolvers = {
  Query: {
    getAllPeople: () => people, //if the user runs the getAllPeople command
    //if the user runs the getPerson command:
    getPerson: (_: any, args: any) => { 
      console.log(args);
      //get the object that contains the specified ID.
      return people.find((person) => person.id === args.id);
    },
  },
};
export default Resolvers;
  • Here, we created a Query object that handles all the incoming queries going to the server
  • If the user executes the getAllPeople command, the program will return all the objects present in our database
  • Moreover, the getPerson command requires an argument id. This will return a Person instance with the matching ID
  • In the end, we exported our resolver so that it could be linked with our app

Configuring our server

We’re almost done! Now that we have built both our schema and resolver, our next step is to link them together.

In index.js, write this block of code:

import { ApolloServer } from "apollo-server-express";
import Schema from "./Schema";
import Resolvers from "./Resolvers";
import express from "express";
import { ApolloServerPluginDrainHttpServer } from "apollo-server-core";
import http from "http";

async function startApolloServer(schema: any, resolvers: any) {
  const app = express();
  const httpServer = http.createServer(app);
  const server = new ApolloServer({
    typeDefs: schema,
    resolvers,
    //tell Express to attach GraphQL functionality to the server
    plugins: [ApolloServerPluginDrainHttpServer({ httpServer })],
  }) as any;
  await server.start(); //start the GraphQL server.
  server.applyMiddleware({ app });
  await new Promise<void>((resolve) =>
    httpServer.listen({ port: 4000 }, resolve) //run the server on port 4000
  );
  console.log(`Server ready at http://localhost:4000${server.graphqlPath}`);
}
//in the end, run the server and pass in our Schema and Resolver.
startApolloServer(Schema, Resolvers);

Let’s test it out! To run the code, use this Bash command:

npx nodemon app/index.ts 

This will create a server at the localhost:4000/graphql URL.

Here, you can see your available schemas within the UI:

Available Schemas Within The UI

This means that our code works!

All of our GraphQL queries will go within the Operation panel. To see it in action, type this snippet within this box:

#make a query:
query {
  #get all of the people available in the server
  getAllPeople {
    #procure their IDs and names.
    id
    name
  }
}

To see the result, click on the Run button:

Run Button For Results

We can even search for a specific entity via the getPerson query:

query ($getPersonId: Int) { #the argument will be of type Integer
  getPerson(id: 1) {
    #get the person with the ID of 1
    name
    id
  }
}

Getperson Query

Creating mutations

In the GraphQL world, mutations are commands that perform side effects on the database. Common examples of this include:

  • Adding a user to the database — When a client signs up for a website, the user performs a mutation to save their data in their database
  • Editing or deleting an object — If a user modifies or removes data from a database, they are essentially creating a mutation on the server

To handle mutations, go to your Schema.ts module. Here, within the Schema variable, add the following lines of code:

const Schema = gql`
  #other code..
  type Mutation {
    #the addPerson commmand will accept an argument of type String.
    #it will return a 'Person' instance. 
    addPerson(name: String): Person
  }
`;

Our next step is to create a resolver to handle this mutation. To do so, within the Resolvers.ts file, add this block of code:

const Resolvers = {
  Query: {
    //..further code..
  },
  //code to add:
  //all our mutations go here.
  Mutation: {
    //create our mutation:
    addPerson: (_: any, args: any) => {
      const newPerson = {
        id: people.length + 1, //id field
        name: args.name, //name field
      };
      people.push(newPerson);
      return newPerson; //return the new object's result
    },
  },
};
  • The addPerson mutation accepts a name argument
  • When a name is passed, the program will create a new object with a matching name key
  • Next, it will use the push method to add this object to the people dataset
  • Finally, it will return the new object’s properties to the client

That’s it! To test it out, run this code within the Operations window:

#perform a mutation on the server
mutation($name: String) {
  addPerson(name:"Hussain") { #add a new person with the name "Hussain"
    #if the execution succeeds, return its 'id' and 'name` to the user.
    id
    name
  }
}

Addperson

Let’s verify if GraphQL has added the new entry to the database:

query {
  getAllPeople { #get all the results within the 'people' database. 
  #return only their names
  name 
  }
}

Verify That GraphQL Added A New Entry

Building our client

We have successfully built our server. In this section, we will build a client app using Next that will listen to the server and render data to the UI.

As a first step, initialize a blank Next.js app like so:

npx create-next-app@latest graphql-client --ts
touch constants.tsx #our query variables go here.

To perform GraphQL operations, we will use the graphql-request library. This is a minimal, open source module that will help us make mutations and queries on our server:

npm install graphql-request graphql
npm install react-hook-form #to capture user input

Creating query variables

In this section, we will code our queries and mutations to help us make GraphQL operations. To do so, go to constants.tsx and add the following code:

import { gql } from "graphql-request";
//create our query
const getAllPeopleQuery = gql`
  query {
    getAllPeople { #run the getAllPeople command
      id
      name
    }
  }
`;
//Next, declare a mutation
const addPersonMutation = gql`
  mutation addPeople($name: String!) {
    addPerson(name: $name) { #add a new entry. Argument will be 'name'
      id
      name
    }
  }
`;
export { getAllPeopleQuery, addPersonMutation };
  • In the first part, we created the getAllPeopleQuery variable. When the user runs this query, the program will instruct the server to get all the entries present in the database
  • Later on, the addPerson mutation tells GraphQL to add a new entry with its respected name field
  • In the end, we used the export keyword to link our variables with the rest of the project

Performing queries

In pages/index.ts, write the following code:

import type { NextPage, GetStaticProps, InferGetStaticPropsType } from "next";
import { request } from "graphql-request"; //allows us to perform a request on our server
import { getAllPeopleQuery } from "../constants"; 
import Link from "next/link";
const Home: NextPage = ({
  result, //extract the 'result' prop 
}: InferGetStaticPropsType<typeof getStaticProps>) => {
  return (
    <div className={styles.container}>
      {result.map((item: any) => { //render the 'result' array to the UI 
        return <p key={item.id}>{item.name}</p>;
      })}
    <Link href="/addpage">Add a new entry </Link>
    </div>
  );
};
//fetch data from the server
export const getStaticProps: GetStaticProps = async () => {
  //the first argument is the URL of our GraphQL server
  const res = await request("http://localhost:4000/graphql", getAllPeopleQuery);
  const result = res.getAllPeople;
  return {
    props: {
      result,
    }, // will be passed to the page component as props
  };
};
export default Home;

Here is a breakdown of this code piece by piece:

  • In the getStaticProps method, we instructed Next to run the getAllPeople command on our GraphQL server
  • Later on, we returned its response to the Home functional component. This means that we can now render the result to the UI
  • Next, the program used the map method to render all of the results of the getAllPeople command to the UI. Each paragraph element will display the name fields of each entry
  • Furthermore, we also used a Link component to redirect the user to the addpage route. This will allow the user to add a new Person instance to the table

To test out the code, run the following terminal command:

npm run dev

This will be the result:

Addpage Route

Our GraphQL server even updates in real time.

GraphQL Updating In Real Time

Performing mutations

Now that we have successfully performed a query, we can even perform mutations via the graphql-request library.

Within your pages folder, create a new file called addpage.tsx. As the name suggests, this component will allow the user to add a new entry to the database. Here, start by writing the following block of code:

import type { NextPage, GetStaticProps, InferGetStaticPropsType } from "next";
import { request } from "graphql-request";
import { addPersonMutation } from "../constants";
const AddPage: NextPage = () => {
  return (
    <div>
      <p>We will add a new entry here. </p>
    </div>
  );
};
export default AddPage;

In this piece of code, we are creating a blank page with a piece of text. We are doing this to ensure whether our URL routing system works.

Creating A Blank Page To Ensure URL Routing Works

This means that we used routing successfully! Next, write this snippet in your addpage.tsx file:

import { useForm } from "react-hook-form";
const { register, handleSubmit } = useForm();
//if the user submits the form, then the program will output the value of their input.
const onSubmit = (data: any) => console.log(data);
return (
  <div>
    <form onSubmit={handleSubmit(onSubmit)}> {/*Bind our handler to this form.*/}
      {/* The user's input will be saved within the 'name' property */}
      <input defaultValue="test" {...register("name")} />
      <input type="submit" />
    </form>
  </div>
);

This will be the output:

 Output

Now that we have successfully captured the user’s input, our last step is to add their entry to the server.

To do so, change the onSubmit handler located in pages/addpage.tsx file like so:

const onSubmit = async (data: any) => {
  const response = await request(
    "http://localhost:4000/graphql",
    addPersonMutation,
    data
  );
  console.log(response);
};
  • Here, we’re performing a mutation request to our GraphQL server via the request function
  • Furthermore, we also passed in the addPerson mutation command to our request header. This will tell GraphQL to perform the addMutation action on our server

This will be the result:

Result Of Addmutation Action

And we’re done!

Conclusion

Here is the full source code of this project.

In this article, you learned how to create a full-stack app using GraphQL and TypeScript. They both are extremely crucial skills within the programming world since they are in high demand nowadays.

If you encountered any difficulty in this code, I advise you to deconstruct the code and play with it so that you can fully grasp this concept.

Thank you so much for reading! Happy coding!

This story was originally published at https://blog.logrocket.com/build-graphql-app-node-js-typescript-graphql-request/

#graphql #typescript #nodejs 

Saul  Alaniz

Saul Alaniz

1654310400

Cree Una Aplicación GraphQL En Node.js Con TypeScript Y Graphql-reques

En este artículo, creará una aplicación de pila completa utilizando GraphQL y Node.js en el backend. Mientras tanto, nuestro frontend usará la graphql-requestbiblioteca para realizar operaciones de red en nuestro backend.

¿Por qué usar graphql-request y TypeScript?

Cada vez que los desarrolladores construyen un servidor GraphQL usando Apollo, la biblioteca genera una "interfaz" que se ve así:

Esta interfaz permite a los usuarios realizar consultas o solicitudes de mutación al servidor a través de un código. Sin embargo, hablemos del elefante en la habitación: no parece muy fácil de usar. Dado que la interfaz no presenta ningún botón ni ningún elemento de interfaz útil, puede ser difícil para muchos usuarios navegar por su aplicación. En consecuencia, esto reduce su base de usuarios. Entonces, ¿cómo resolvemos este problema?

Aquí es donde graphql-requestentra en juego. Es una biblioteca de código abierto que permite a los usuarios realizar consultas en un servidor GraphQL. Cuenta con las siguientes características:

  • Ligero: esta biblioteca tiene un poco más de 21 kilobytes minimizados, lo que garantiza que su aplicación se mantenga en funcionamiento
  • API basada en promesas: esto brinda soporte para aplicaciones asíncronas
  • Compatibilidad con TypeScript: graphql-requestes una de las muchas bibliotecas que permite TypeScript. Una de las principales ventajas de Typescript es que permite un código estable y predecible.

Por ejemplo, mira el siguiente programa:

let myNumber = 9; //here, myNumber is an integer
myNumber = 'hello'; //now it is a string.
myNumber = myNumber + 10; //even though we are adding a string to an integer,
//JavaScript won't return an error. In the real world, it might bring unexpected outputs.
//However, in Typescript, we can tell the compiler..
//what data types we need to choose.
let myNumber:number = 39; //tell TS that we want to declare an integer.
myNumber = 9+'hello'; //returns an error. Therefore, it's easier to debug the program
//this promises stability and security. 

En este artículo, crearemos una aplicación de pila completa utilizando GraphQL y TypeScript. Aquí, usaremos el apollo-server-expresspaquete para construir un servidor backend. Además, para la interfaz, usaremos Next y graphql-requestconsumiremos nuestra API GraphQL.

Construyendo nuestro servidor

Inicialización del proyecto

Para inicializar un proyecto Node.js en blanco, ejecute estos comandos de terminal:

mkdir graphql-ts-tutorial #create project folder 
cd graphql-ts-tutorial 
npm init -y #initialize the app

Cuando termine, ahora tenemos que decirle a Node que necesitamos usar TypeScript en nuestra base de código:

#configure our Typescript:
npx tsc --init --rootDir app --outDir dist --esModuleInterop --resolveJsonModule --lib es6 --module commonjs --allowJs true --noImplicitAny true
mkdir app #our main code folder
mkdir dist #Typescript will use this folder to compile our program.

A continuación, instale estas dependencias:

#development dependencies. Will tell Node that we will use Typescript
npm install -d ts-node @types/node typescript @types/express nodemon
#Installing Apollo Server and its associated modules. Will help us build our GraphQL
#server
npm install apollo-server-express apollo-server-core express graphql

Después de este paso, navegue a su appcarpeta. Aquí, crea los siguientes archivos:

  • index.ts: Nuestro archivo principal. Esto ejecutará y ejecutará nuestro servidor Express GraphQL
  • dataset.ts: Esto servirá como nuestra base de datos, que se servirá al cliente
  • Resolvers.ts: Este módulo manejará los comandos del usuario. Aprenderemos sobre los resolutores más adelante en este artículo.
  • Schema.ts: como sugiere el nombre, este archivo almacenará los esquemas necesarios para enviar datos al cliente

Al final, la estructura de carpetas debería verse así:

Creando nuestra base de datos

En esta sección, crearemos una base de datos ficticia que se utilizará para enviar los datos solicitados. Para hacerlo, vaya a app/dataset.tsy escriba el siguiente código:

let people: { id: number; name: string }[] = [
  { id: 1, name: "Cassie" },
  { id: 2, name: "Rue" },
  { id: 3, name: "Lexi" },
];
export default people;
  • Primero, creamos una matriz de objetos llamadapeople
  • Esta matriz tendrá dos campos: idde tipo numbery namede tipostring

Definiendo nuestro esquema

Aquí, ahora crearemos un esquema para nuestro servidor GraphQL.

En pocas palabras, un esquema de GraphQL es una descripción del conjunto de datos que los clientes pueden solicitar desde una API. Este concepto es similar al de la biblioteca Mongoose .
Para crear un esquema, vaya al app/Schema.tsarchivo. Allí escribe el siguiente código:

import { gql } from "apollo-server-express"; //will create a schema
const Schema = gql`
  type Person {
    id: ID!
    name: String
  }
  #handle user commands
  type Query {
    getAllPeople: [Person] #will return multiple Person instances
    getPerson(id: Int): Person #has an argument of 'id` of type Integer.
  }
`;
export default Schema; 
//export this Schema so we can use it in our project

Desglosemos este código pieza por pieza:

  • La Schemavariable contiene nuestro esquema GraphQL
  • Primero, creamos un Personesquema. Tendrá dos campos: idde tipo IDy namede tipoString
  • Más adelante, le indicamos a GraphQL que si el cliente ejecuta el getAllPeoplecomando, el servidor devolverá una matriz de Personobjetos
  • Además, si el usuario usa el getPersoncomando, GraphQL devolverá una sola Personinstancia

Creando resolutores

Ahora que hemos codificado nuestro esquema, nuestro siguiente paso es definir nuestros resolutores.
En términos simples, un resolver es un grupo de funciones que generan una respuesta para una consulta de GraphQL. En otras palabras, un resolver sirve como un controlador de consultas GraphQL.
En Resolvers.ts, escribe el siguiente código:

import people from "./dataset"; //get all of the available data from our database.
const Resolvers = {
  Query: {
    getAllPeople: () => people, //if the user runs the getAllPeople command
    //if the user runs the getPerson command:
    getPerson: (_: any, args: any) => { 
      console.log(args);
      //get the object that contains the specified ID.
      return people.find((person) => person.id === args.id);
    },
  },
};
export default Resolvers;
  • Aquí, creamos un Queryobjeto que maneja todas las consultas entrantes que van al servidor
  • Si el usuario ejecuta el getAllPeoplecomando, el programa devolverá todos los objetos presentes en nuestra base de datos
  • Además, el getPersoncomando requiere un argumento id. Esto devolverá una Personinstancia con el ID coincidente
  • Al final, exportamos nuestro resolver para que pudiera vincularse con nuestra aplicación.

Configurando nuestro servidor

¡Ya casi hemos terminado! Ahora que hemos creado tanto nuestro esquema como nuestro resolutor, nuestro siguiente paso es vincularlos.

En index.js, escribe este bloque de código:

import { ApolloServer } from "apollo-server-express";
import Schema from "./Schema";
import Resolvers from "./Resolvers";
import express from "express";
import { ApolloServerPluginDrainHttpServer } from "apollo-server-core";
import http from "http";

async function startApolloServer(schema: any, resolvers: any) {
  const app = express();
  const httpServer = http.createServer(app);
  const server = new ApolloServer({
    typeDefs: schema,
    resolvers,
    //tell Express to attach GraphQL functionality to the server
    plugins: [ApolloServerPluginDrainHttpServer({ httpServer })],
  }) as any;
  await server.start(); //start the GraphQL server.
  server.applyMiddleware({ app });
  await new Promise<void>((resolve) =>
    httpServer.listen({ port: 4000 }, resolve) //run the server on port 4000
  );
  console.log(`Server ready at http://localhost:4000${server.graphqlPath}`);
}
//in the end, run the server and pass in our Schema and Resolver.
startApolloServer(Schema, Resolvers);

¡Vamos a probarlo! Para ejecutar el código, use este comando Bash:

npx nodemon app/index.ts 

Esto creará un servidor en la localhost:4000/graphqlURL.

Aquí puede ver sus esquemas disponibles dentro de la interfaz de usuario:

¡Esto significa que nuestro código funciona!

Todas nuestras consultas de GraphQL irán dentro del panel de Operación . Para verlo en acción, escriba este fragmento dentro de este cuadro:

#make a query:
query {
  #get all of the people available in the server
  getAllPeople {
    #procure their IDs and names.
    id
    name
  }
}

Para ver el resultado, haga clic en el botón Ejecutar :

Incluso podemos buscar una entidad específica a través de la getPersonconsulta:

query ($getPersonId: Int) { #the argument will be of type Integer
  getPerson(id: 1) {
    #get the person with the ID of 1
    name
    id
  }
}

Creando mutaciones

En el mundo de GraphQL, las mutaciones son comandos que tienen efectos secundarios en la base de datos. Ejemplos comunes de esto incluyen:

  • Agregar un usuario a la base de datos: cuando un cliente se registra en un sitio web, el usuario realiza una mutación para guardar sus datos en su base de datos
  • Editar o eliminar un objeto: si un usuario modifica o elimina datos de una base de datos, esencialmente está creando una mutación en el servidor.

Para manejar mutaciones, vaya a su Schema.tsmódulo. Aquí, dentro de la Schemavariable, agregue las siguientes líneas de código:

const Schema = gql`
  #other code..
  type Mutation {
    #the addPerson commmand will accept an argument of type String.
    #it will return a 'Person' instance. 
    addPerson(name: String): Person
  }
`;

Nuestro próximo paso es crear un resolver para manejar esta mutación. Para hacerlo, dentro del Resolvers.tsarchivo, agregue este bloque de código:

const Resolvers = {
  Query: {
    //..further code..
  },
  //code to add:
  //all our mutations go here.
  Mutation: {
    //create our mutation:
    addPerson: (_: any, args: any) => {
      const newPerson = {
        id: people.length + 1, //id field
        name: args.name, //name field
      };
      people.push(newPerson);
      return newPerson; //return the new object's result
    },
  },
};
  • La addPersonmutación acepta un nameargumento.
  • Cuando namese pasa a, el programa creará un nuevo objeto con una nameclave coincidente
  • A continuación, utilizará el pushmétodo para agregar este objeto al conjunto de peopledatos .
  • Finalmente, devolverá las propiedades del nuevo objeto al cliente.

¡Eso es todo! Para probarlo, ejecute este código dentro de la ventana Operaciones :

#perform a mutation on the server
mutation($name: String) {
  addPerson(name:"Hussain") { #add a new person with the name "Hussain"
    #if the execution succeeds, return its 'id' and 'name` to the user.
    id
    name
  }
}

Verifiquemos si GraphQL ha agregado la nueva entrada a la base de datos:

query {
  getAllPeople { #get all the results within the 'people' database. 
  #return only their names
  name 
  }
}

Construyendo nuestro cliente

Hemos construido con éxito nuestro servidor. En esta sección, crearemos una aplicación cliente usando Next que escuchará al servidor y procesará datos en la interfaz de usuario.

Como primer paso, inicialice una aplicación Next.js en blanco así:

npx create-next-app@latest graphql-client --ts
touch constants.tsx #our query variables go here.

Para realizar operaciones GraphQL, utilizaremos la biblioteca graphql-request . Este es un módulo mínimo y de código abierto que nos ayudará a realizar mutaciones y consultas en nuestro servidor:

npm install graphql-request graphql
npm install react-hook-form #to capture user input

Creación de variables de consulta

En esta sección, codificaremos nuestras consultas y mutaciones para ayudarnos a realizar operaciones GraphQL. Para hacerlo, vaya a constants.tsxy agregue el siguiente código:

import { gql } from "graphql-request";
//create our query
const getAllPeopleQuery = gql`
  query {
    getAllPeople { #run the getAllPeople command
      id
      name
    }
  }
`;
//Next, declare a mutation
const addPersonMutation = gql`
  mutation addPeople($name: String!) {
    addPerson(name: $name) { #add a new entry. Argument will be 'name'
      id
      name
    }
  }
`;
export { getAllPeopleQuery, addPersonMutation };
  • En la primera parte, creamos la getAllPeopleQueryvariable. Cuando el usuario ejecuta esta consulta, el programa le indicará al servidor que obtenga todas las entradas presentes en la base de datos.
  • Más tarde, la addPersonmutación le dice a GraphQL que agregue una nueva entrada con su namecampo respectivo
  • Al final, usamos la exportpalabra clave para vincular nuestras variables con el resto del proyecto.

Realización de consultas

En pages/index.ts, escribe el siguiente código:

import type { NextPage, GetStaticProps, InferGetStaticPropsType } from "next";
import { request } from "graphql-request"; //allows us to perform a request on our server
import { getAllPeopleQuery } from "../constants"; 
import Link from "next/link";
const Home: NextPage = ({
  result, //extract the 'result' prop 
}: InferGetStaticPropsType<typeof getStaticProps>) => {
  return (
    <div className={styles.container}>
      {result.map((item: any) => { //render the 'result' array to the UI 
        return <p key={item.id}>{item.name}</p>;
      })}
    <Link href="/addpage">Add a new entry </Link>
    </div>
  );
};
//fetch data from the server
export const getStaticProps: GetStaticProps = async () => {
  //the first argument is the URL of our GraphQL server
  const res = await request("http://localhost:4000/graphql", getAllPeopleQuery);
  const result = res.getAllPeople;
  return {
    props: {
      result,
    }, // will be passed to the page component as props
  };
};
export default Home;

Aquí hay un desglose de este código pieza por pieza:

  • En el getStaticPropsmétodo, le indicamos a Next que ejecute el getAllPeoplecomando en nuestro servidor GraphQL
  • Posteriormente, devolvimos su respuesta al Homecomponente funcional. Esto significa que ahora podemos mostrar el resultado en la interfaz de usuario.
  • A continuación, el programa usó el mapmétodo para representar todos los resultados del getAllPeoplecomando en la interfaz de usuario. Cada elemento de párrafo mostrará los namecampos de cada entrada
  • Además, también usamos un Linkcomponente para redirigir al usuario a la addpageruta. Esto permitirá al usuario agregar una nueva Personinstancia a la tabla .

Para probar el código, ejecute el siguiente comando de terminal:

npm run dev

Este será el resultado:

Nuestro servidor GraphQL incluso se actualiza en tiempo real.

Realizando mutaciones

Ahora que hemos realizado con éxito una consulta, incluso podemos realizar mutaciones a través de la graphql-requestbiblioteca.

Dentro de su pagescarpeta, cree un nuevo archivo llamado addpage.tsx. Como sugiere el nombre, este componente permitirá al usuario agregar una nueva entrada a la base de datos. Aquí, comience escribiendo el siguiente bloque de código:

import type { NextPage, GetStaticProps, InferGetStaticPropsType } from "next";
import { request } from "graphql-request";
import { addPersonMutation } from "../constants";
const AddPage: NextPage = () => {
  return (
    <div>
      <p>We will add a new entry here. </p>
    </div>
  );
};
export default AddPage;

En este fragmento de código, estamos creando una página en blanco con un fragmento de texto. Estamos haciendo esto para asegurarnos de que nuestro sistema de enrutamiento de URL funcione.

¡Esto significa que usamos el enrutamiento con éxito! A continuación, escribe este fragmento en tu addpage.tsxarchivo:

import { useForm } from "react-hook-form";
const { register, handleSubmit } = useForm();
//if the user submits the form, then the program will output the value of their input.
const onSubmit = (data: any) => console.log(data);
return (
  <div>
    <form onSubmit={handleSubmit(onSubmit)}> {/*Bind our handler to this form.*/}
      {/* The user's input will be saved within the 'name' property */}
      <input defaultValue="test" {...register("name")} />
      <input type="submit" />
    </form>
  </div>
);

Esta será la salida:

 

Ahora que hemos capturado con éxito la entrada del usuario, nuestro último paso es agregar su entrada al servidor.

Para hacerlo, cambie el onSubmitcontrolador ubicado en pages/addpage.tsxel archivo de esta manera:

const onSubmit = async (data: any) => {
  const response = await request(
    "http://localhost:4000/graphql",
    addPersonMutation,
    data
  );
  console.log(response);
};
  • Aquí, estamos realizando una solicitud de mutación a nuestro servidor GraphQL a través de la requestfunción
  • Además, también pasamos el addPersoncomando de mutación a nuestro encabezado de solicitud. Esto le indicará a GraphQL que realice la addMutationacción en nuestro servidor

Este será el resultado:

¡Y hemos terminado!

Conclusión

Aquí está el código fuente completo de este proyecto.

En este artículo, aprendió a crear una aplicación completa con GraphQL y TypeScript. Ambas son habilidades extremadamente cruciales dentro del mundo de la programación, ya que tienen una gran demanda en la actualidad.

Si encontró alguna dificultad en este código, le aconsejo que deconstruya el código y juegue con él para que pueda comprender completamente este concepto.

Muchas Gracias Por Leer! ¡Feliz codificación!

Esta historia se publicó originalmente en https://blog.logrocket.com/build-graphql-app-node-js-typescript-graphql-request/

#graphql #typescript #nodejs 

LaravelS: Glue for using Swoole in Laravel Or Lumen

🚀 LaravelS is an out-of-the-box adapter between Swoole and Laravel/Lumen.

Please Watch this repository to get the latest updates.

 _                               _  _____ 
| |                             | |/ ____|
| |     __ _ _ __ __ ___   _____| | (___  
| |    / _` | '__/ _` \ \ / / _ \ |\___ \ 
| |___| (_| | | | (_| |\ V /  __/ |____) |
|______\__,_|_|  \__,_| \_/ \___|_|_____/ 

中文文档

Features

Built-in Http/WebSocket server

Multi-port mixed protocol

Custom process

Memory resident

Asynchronous event listening

Asynchronous task queue

Millisecond cron job

Common Components

Gracefully reload

Automatically reload after modifying code

Support Laravel/Lumen both, good compatibility

Simple & Out of the box

Benchmark

Which is the fastest web framework?

TechEmpower Framework Benchmarks

Requirements

DependencyRequirement
PHP>= 5.5.9 Recommend PHP7+
Swoole>= 1.7.19 No longer support PHP5 since 2.0.12 Recommend 4.5.0+
Laravel/Lumen>= 5.1 Recommend 8.0+

Install

1.Require package via Composer(packagist).

composer require "hhxsv5/laravel-s:~3.7.0" -vvv
# Make sure that your composer.lock file is under the VCS

2.Register service provider(pick one of two).

Laravel: in config/app.php file, Laravel 5.5+ supports package discovery automatically, you should skip this step

'providers' => [
    //...
    Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Illuminate\LaravelSServiceProvider::class,
],

Lumen: in bootstrap/app.php file

$app->register(Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Illuminate\LaravelSServiceProvider::class);

3.Publish configuration and binaries.

After upgrading LaravelS, you need to republish; click here to see the change notes of each version.

php artisan laravels publish
# Configuration: config/laravels.php
# Binary: bin/laravels bin/fswatch bin/inotify

4.Change config/laravels.php: listen_ip, listen_port, refer Settings.

5.Performance tuning

Adjust kernel parameters

Number of Workers: LaravelS uses Swoole's Synchronous IO mode, the larger the worker_num setting, the better the concurrency performance, but it will cause more memory usage and process switching overhead. If one request takes 100ms, in order to provide 1000QPS concurrency, at least 100 Worker processes need to be configured. The calculation method is: worker_num = 1000QPS/(1s/1ms) = 100, so incremental pressure testing is needed to calculate the best worker_num.

Number of Task Workers

Run

Please read the notices carefully before running, Important notices(IMPORTANT).

  • Commands: php bin/laravels {start|stop|restart|reload|info|help}.
CommandDescription
startStart LaravelS, list the processes by "ps -ef|grep laravels"
stopStop LaravelS, and trigger the method onStop of Custom process
restartRestart LaravelS: Stop gracefully before starting; The service is unavailable until startup is complete
reloadReload all Task/Worker/Timer processes which contain your business codes, and trigger the method onReload of Custom process, CANNOT reload Master/Manger processes. After modifying config/laravels.php, you only have to call restart to restart
infoDisplay component version information
helpDisplay help information
  • Boot options for the commands start and restart.
OptionDescription
-d|--daemonizeRun as a daemon, this option will override the swoole.daemonize setting in laravels.php
-e|--envThe environment the command should run under, such as --env=testing will use the configuration file .env.testing firstly, this feature requires Laravel 5.2+
-i|--ignoreIgnore checking PID file of Master process
-x|--x-versionThe version(branch) of the current project, stored in $_ENV/$_SERVER, access via $_ENV['X_VERSION'] $_SERVER['X_VERSION'] $request->server->get('X_VERSION')
  • Runtime files: start will automatically execute php artisan laravels config and generate these files, developers generally don't need to pay attention to them, it's recommended to add them to .gitignore.
FileDescription
storage/laravels.confLaravelS's runtime configuration file
storage/laravels.pidPID file of Master process
storage/laravels-timer-process.pidPID file of the Timer process
storage/laravels-custom-processes.pidPID file of all custom processes

Deploy

It is recommended to supervise the main process through Supervisord, the premise is without option -d and to set swoole.daemonize to false.

[program:laravel-s-test]
directory=/var/www/laravel-s-test
command=/usr/local/bin/php bin/laravels start -i
numprocs=1
autostart=true
autorestart=true
startretries=3
user=www-data
redirect_stderr=true
stdout_logfile=/var/log/supervisor/%(program_name)s.log

Cooperate with Nginx (Recommended)

Demo.

gzip on;
gzip_min_length 1024;
gzip_comp_level 2;
gzip_types text/plain text/css text/javascript application/json application/javascript application/x-javascript application/xml application/x-httpd-php image/jpeg image/gif image/png font/ttf font/otf image/svg+xml;
gzip_vary on;
gzip_disable "msie6";
upstream swoole {
    # Connect IP:Port
    server 127.0.0.1:5200 weight=5 max_fails=3 fail_timeout=30s;
    # Connect UnixSocket Stream file, tips: put the socket file in the /dev/shm directory to get better performance
    #server unix:/yourpath/laravel-s-test/storage/laravels.sock weight=5 max_fails=3 fail_timeout=30s;
    #server 192.168.1.1:5200 weight=3 max_fails=3 fail_timeout=30s;
    #server 192.168.1.2:5200 backup;
    keepalive 16;
}
server {
    listen 80;
    # Don't forget to bind the host
    server_name laravels.com;
    root /yourpath/laravel-s-test/public;
    access_log /yourpath/log/nginx/$server_name.access.log  main;
    autoindex off;
    index index.html index.htm;
    # Nginx handles the static resources(recommend enabling gzip), LaravelS handles the dynamic resource.
    location / {
        try_files $uri @laravels;
    }
    # Response 404 directly when request the PHP file, to avoid exposing public/*.php
    #location ~* \.php$ {
    #    return 404;
    #}
    location @laravels {
        # proxy_connect_timeout 60s;
        # proxy_send_timeout 60s;
        # proxy_read_timeout 120s;
        proxy_http_version 1.1;
        proxy_set_header Connection "";
        proxy_set_header X-Real-IP $remote_addr;
        proxy_set_header X-Real-PORT $remote_port;
        proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-For $proxy_add_x_forwarded_for;
        proxy_set_header Host $http_host;
        proxy_set_header Scheme $scheme;
        proxy_set_header Server-Protocol $server_protocol;
        proxy_set_header Server-Name $server_name;
        proxy_set_header Server-Addr $server_addr;
        proxy_set_header Server-Port $server_port;
        # "swoole" is the upstream
        proxy_pass http://swoole;
    }
}

Cooperate with Apache

LoadModule proxy_module /yourpath/modules/mod_proxy.so
LoadModule proxy_balancer_module /yourpath/modules/mod_proxy_balancer.so
LoadModule lbmethod_byrequests_module /yourpath/modules/mod_lbmethod_byrequests.so
LoadModule proxy_http_module /yourpath/modules/mod_proxy_http.so
LoadModule slotmem_shm_module /yourpath/modules/mod_slotmem_shm.so
LoadModule rewrite_module /yourpath/modules/mod_rewrite.so
LoadModule remoteip_module /yourpath/modules/mod_remoteip.so
LoadModule deflate_module /yourpath/modules/mod_deflate.so

<IfModule deflate_module>
    SetOutputFilter DEFLATE
    DeflateCompressionLevel 2
    AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE text/html text/plain text/css text/javascript application/json application/javascript application/x-javascript application/xml application/x-httpd-php image/jpeg image/gif image/png font/ttf font/otf image/svg+xml
</IfModule>

<VirtualHost *:80>
    # Don't forget to bind the host
    ServerName www.laravels.com
    ServerAdmin hhxsv5@sina.com

    DocumentRoot /yourpath/laravel-s-test/public;
    DirectoryIndex index.html index.htm
    <Directory "/">
        AllowOverride None
        Require all granted
    </Directory>

    RemoteIPHeader X-Forwarded-For

    ProxyRequests Off
    ProxyPreserveHost On
    <Proxy balancer://laravels>  
        BalancerMember http://192.168.1.1:5200 loadfactor=7
        #BalancerMember http://192.168.1.2:5200 loadfactor=3
        #BalancerMember http://192.168.1.3:5200 loadfactor=1 status=+H
        ProxySet lbmethod=byrequests
    </Proxy>
    #ProxyPass / balancer://laravels/
    #ProxyPassReverse / balancer://laravels/

    # Apache handles the static resources, LaravelS handles the dynamic resource.
    RewriteEngine On
    RewriteCond %{DOCUMENT_ROOT}%{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
    RewriteCond %{DOCUMENT_ROOT}%{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
    RewriteRule ^/(.*)$ balancer://laravels%{REQUEST_URI} [P,L]

    ErrorLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/www.laravels.com.error.log
    CustomLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/www.laravels.com.access.log combined
</VirtualHost>

Enable WebSocket server

The Listening address of WebSocket Sever is the same as Http Server.

1.Create WebSocket Handler class, and implement interface WebSocketHandlerInterface.The instant is automatically instantiated when start, you do not need to manually create it.

namespace App\Services;
use Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Swoole\WebSocketHandlerInterface;
use Swoole\Http\Request;
use Swoole\Http\Response;
use Swoole\WebSocket\Frame;
use Swoole\WebSocket\Server;
/**
 * @see https://www.swoole.co.uk/docs/modules/swoole-websocket-server
 */
class WebSocketService implements WebSocketHandlerInterface
{
    // Declare constructor without parameters
    public function __construct()
    {
    }
    // public function onHandShake(Request $request, Response $response)
    // {
           // Custom handshake: https://www.swoole.co.uk/docs/modules/swoole-websocket-server-on-handshake
           // The onOpen event will be triggered automatically after a successful handshake
    // }
    public function onOpen(Server $server, Request $request)
    {
        // Before the onOpen event is triggered, the HTTP request to establish the WebSocket has passed the Laravel route,
        // so Laravel's Request, Auth information are readable, Session is readable and writable, but only in the onOpen event.
        // \Log::info('New WebSocket connection', [$request->fd, request()->all(), session()->getId(), session('xxx'), session(['yyy' => time()])]);
        // The exceptions thrown here will be caught by the upper layer and recorded in the Swoole log. Developers need to try/catch manually.
        $server->push($request->fd, 'Welcome to LaravelS');
    }
    public function onMessage(Server $server, Frame $frame)
    {
        // \Log::info('Received message', [$frame->fd, $frame->data, $frame->opcode, $frame->finish]);
        // The exceptions thrown here will be caught by the upper layer and recorded in the Swoole log. Developers need to try/catch manually.
        $server->push($frame->fd, date('Y-m-d H:i:s'));
    }
    public function onClose(Server $server, $fd, $reactorId)
    {
        // The exceptions thrown here will be caught by the upper layer and recorded in the Swoole log. Developers need to try/catch manually.
    }
}

2.Modify config/laravels.php.

// ...
'websocket'      => [
    'enable'  => true, // Note: set enable to true
    'handler' => \App\Services\WebSocketService::class,
],
'swoole'         => [
    //...
    // Must set dispatch_mode in (2, 4, 5), see https://www.swoole.co.uk/docs/modules/swoole-server/configuration
    'dispatch_mode' => 2,
    //...
],
// ...

3.Use SwooleTable to bind FD & UserId, optional, Swoole Table Demo. Also you can use the other global storage services, like Redis/Memcached/MySQL, but be careful that FD will be possible conflicting between multiple Swoole Servers.

4.Cooperate with Nginx (Recommended)

Refer WebSocket Proxy

map $http_upgrade $connection_upgrade {
    default upgrade;
    ''      close;
}
upstream swoole {
    # Connect IP:Port
    server 127.0.0.1:5200 weight=5 max_fails=3 fail_timeout=30s;
    # Connect UnixSocket Stream file, tips: put the socket file in the /dev/shm directory to get better performance
    #server unix:/yourpath/laravel-s-test/storage/laravels.sock weight=5 max_fails=3 fail_timeout=30s;
    #server 192.168.1.1:5200 weight=3 max_fails=3 fail_timeout=30s;
    #server 192.168.1.2:5200 backup;
    keepalive 16;
}
server {
    listen 80;
    # Don't forget to bind the host
    server_name laravels.com;
    root /yourpath/laravel-s-test/public;
    access_log /yourpath/log/nginx/$server_name.access.log  main;
    autoindex off;
    index index.html index.htm;
    # Nginx handles the static resources(recommend enabling gzip), LaravelS handles the dynamic resource.
    location / {
        try_files $uri @laravels;
    }
    # Response 404 directly when request the PHP file, to avoid exposing public/*.php
    #location ~* \.php$ {
    #    return 404;
    #}
    # Http and WebSocket are concomitant, Nginx identifies them by "location"
    # !!! The location of WebSocket is "/ws"
    # Javascript: var ws = new WebSocket("ws://laravels.com/ws");
    location =/ws {
        # proxy_connect_timeout 60s;
        # proxy_send_timeout 60s;
        # proxy_read_timeout: Nginx will close the connection if the proxied server does not send data to Nginx in 60 seconds; At the same time, this close behavior is also affected by heartbeat setting of Swoole.
        # proxy_read_timeout 60s;
        proxy_http_version 1.1;
        proxy_set_header X-Real-IP $remote_addr;
        proxy_set_header X-Real-PORT $remote_port;
        proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-For $proxy_add_x_forwarded_for;
        proxy_set_header Host $http_host;
        proxy_set_header Scheme $scheme;
        proxy_set_header Server-Protocol $server_protocol;
        proxy_set_header Server-Name $server_name;
        proxy_set_header Server-Addr $server_addr;
        proxy_set_header Server-Port $server_port;
        proxy_set_header Upgrade $http_upgrade;
        proxy_set_header Connection $connection_upgrade;
        proxy_pass http://swoole;
    }
    location @laravels {
        # proxy_connect_timeout 60s;
        # proxy_send_timeout 60s;
        # proxy_read_timeout 60s;
        proxy_http_version 1.1;
        proxy_set_header Connection "";
        proxy_set_header X-Real-IP $remote_addr;
        proxy_set_header X-Real-PORT $remote_port;
        proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-For $proxy_add_x_forwarded_for;
        proxy_set_header Host $http_host;
        proxy_set_header Scheme $scheme;
        proxy_set_header Server-Protocol $server_protocol;
        proxy_set_header Server-Name $server_name;
        proxy_set_header Server-Addr $server_addr;
        proxy_set_header Server-Port $server_port;
        proxy_pass http://swoole;
    }
}

5.Heartbeat setting

Heartbeat setting of Swoole

// config/laravels.php
'swoole' => [
    //...
    // All connections are traversed every 60 seconds. If a connection does not send any data to the server within 600 seconds, the connection will be forced to close.
    'heartbeat_idle_time'      => 600,
    'heartbeat_check_interval' => 60,
    //...
],

Proxy read timeout of Nginx

# Nginx will close the connection if the proxied server does not send data to Nginx in 60 seconds
proxy_read_timeout 60s;

6.Push data in controller

namespace App\Http\Controllers;
class TestController extends Controller
{
    public function push()
    {
        $fd = 1; // Find fd by userId from a map [userId=>fd].
        /**@var \Swoole\WebSocket\Server $swoole */
        $swoole = app('swoole');
        $success = $swoole->push($fd, 'Push data to fd#1 in Controller');
        var_dump($success);
    }
}

Listen events

System events

Usually, you can reset/destroy some global/static variables, or change the current Request/Response object.

laravels.received_request After LaravelS parsed Swoole\Http\Request to Illuminate\Http\Request, before Laravel's Kernel handles this request.

// Edit file `app/Providers/EventServiceProvider.php`, add the following code into method `boot`
// If no variable $events, you can also call Facade \Event::listen(). 
$events->listen('laravels.received_request', function (\Illuminate\Http\Request $req, $app) {
    $req->query->set('get_key', 'hhxsv5');// Change query of request
    $req->request->set('post_key', 'hhxsv5'); // Change post of request
});

laravels.generated_response After Laravel's Kernel handled the request, before LaravelS parses Illuminate\Http\Response to Swoole\Http\Response.

// Edit file `app/Providers/EventServiceProvider.php`, add the following code into method `boot`
// If no variable $events, you can also call Facade \Event::listen(). 
$events->listen('laravels.generated_response', function (\Illuminate\Http\Request $req, \Symfony\Component\HttpFoundation\Response $rsp, $app) {
    $rsp->headers->set('header-key', 'hhxsv5');// Change header of response
});

Customized asynchronous events

This feature depends on AsyncTask of Swoole, your need to set swoole.task_worker_num in config/laravels.php firstly. The performance of asynchronous event processing is influenced by number of Swoole task process, you need to set task_worker_num appropriately.

1.Create event class.

use Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Swoole\Task\Event;
class TestEvent extends Event
{
    protected $listeners = [
        // Listener list
        TestListener1::class,
        // TestListener2::class,
    ];
    private $data;
    public function __construct($data)
    {
        $this->data = $data;
    }
    public function getData()
    {
        return $this->data;
    }
}

2.Create listener class.

use Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Swoole\Task\Task;
use Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Swoole\Task\Listener;
class TestListener1 extends Listener
{
    /**
     * @var TestEvent
     */
    protected $event;
    
    public function handle()
    {
        \Log::info(__CLASS__ . ':handle start', [$this->event->getData()]);
        sleep(2);// Simulate the slow codes
        // Deliver task in CronJob, but NOT support callback finish() of task.
        // Note: Modify task_ipc_mode to 1 or 2 in config/laravels.php, see https://www.swoole.co.uk/docs/modules/swoole-server/configuration
        $ret = Task::deliver(new TestTask('task data'));
        var_dump($ret);
        // The exceptions thrown here will be caught by the upper layer and recorded in the Swoole log. Developers need to try/catch manually.
    }
}

3.Fire event.

// Create instance of event and fire it, "fire" is asynchronous.
use Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Swoole\Task\Event;
$event = new TestEvent('event data');
// $event->delay(10); // Delay 10 seconds to fire event
// $event->setTries(3); // When an error occurs, try 3 times in total
$success = Event::fire($event);
var_dump($success);// Return true if sucess, otherwise false

Asynchronous task queue

This feature depends on AsyncTask of Swoole, your need to set swoole.task_worker_num in config/laravels.php firstly. The performance of task processing is influenced by number of Swoole task process, you need to set task_worker_num appropriately.

1.Create task class.

use Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Swoole\Task\Task;
class TestTask extends Task
{
    private $data;
    private $result;
    public function __construct($data)
    {
        $this->data = $data;
    }
    // The logic of task handling, run in task process, CAN NOT deliver task
    public function handle()
    {
        \Log::info(__CLASS__ . ':handle start', [$this->data]);
        sleep(2);// Simulate the slow codes
        // The exceptions thrown here will be caught by the upper layer and recorded in the Swoole log. Developers need to try/catch manually.
        $this->result = 'the result of ' . $this->data;
    }
    // Optional, finish event, the logic of after task handling, run in worker process, CAN deliver task 
    public function finish()
    {
        \Log::info(__CLASS__ . ':finish start', [$this->result]);
        Task::deliver(new TestTask2('task2 data')); // Deliver the other task
    }
}

2.Deliver task.

// Create instance of TestTask and deliver it, "deliver" is asynchronous.
use Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Swoole\Task\Task;
$task = new TestTask('task data');
// $task->delay(3);// delay 3 seconds to deliver task
// $task->setTries(3); // When an error occurs, try 3 times in total
$ret = Task::deliver($task);
var_dump($ret);// Return true if sucess, otherwise false

Millisecond cron job

Wrapper cron job base on Swoole's Millisecond Timer, replace Linux Crontab.

1.Create cron job class.

namespace App\Jobs\Timer;
use App\Tasks\TestTask;
use Swoole\Coroutine;
use Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Swoole\Task\Task;
use Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Swoole\Timer\CronJob;
class TestCronJob extends CronJob
{
    protected $i = 0;
    // !!! The `interval` and `isImmediate` of cron job can be configured in two ways(pick one of two): one is to overload the corresponding method, and the other is to pass parameters when registering cron job.
    // --- Override the corresponding method to return the configuration: begin
    public function interval()
    {
        return 1000;// Run every 1000ms
    }
    public function isImmediate()
    {
        return false;// Whether to trigger `run` immediately after setting up
    }
    // --- Override the corresponding method to return the configuration: end
    public function run()
    {
        \Log::info(__METHOD__, ['start', $this->i, microtime(true)]);
        // do something
        // sleep(1); // Swoole < 2.1
        Coroutine::sleep(1); // Swoole>=2.1 Coroutine will be automatically created for run().
        $this->i++;
        \Log::info(__METHOD__, ['end', $this->i, microtime(true)]);

        if ($this->i >= 10) { // Run 10 times only
            \Log::info(__METHOD__, ['stop', $this->i, microtime(true)]);
            $this->stop(); // Stop this cron job, but it will run again after restart/reload.
            // Deliver task in CronJob, but NOT support callback finish() of task.
            // Note: Modify task_ipc_mode to 1 or 2 in config/laravels.php, see https://www.swoole.co.uk/docs/modules/swoole-server/configuration
            $ret = Task::deliver(new TestTask('task data'));
            var_dump($ret);
        }
        // The exceptions thrown here will be caught by the upper layer and recorded in the Swoole log. Developers need to try/catch manually.
    }
}

2.Register cron job.

// Register cron jobs in file "config/laravels.php"
[
    // ...
    'timer'          => [
        'enable' => true, // Enable Timer
        'jobs'   => [ // The list of cron job
            // Enable LaravelScheduleJob to run `php artisan schedule:run` every 1 minute, replace Linux Crontab
            // \Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Illuminate\LaravelScheduleJob::class,
            // Two ways to configure parameters:
            // [\App\Jobs\Timer\TestCronJob::class, [1000, true]], // Pass in parameters when registering
            \App\Jobs\Timer\TestCronJob::class, // Override the corresponding method to return the configuration
        ],
        'max_wait_time' => 5, // Max waiting time of reloading
        // Enable the global lock to ensure that only one instance starts the timer when deploying multiple instances. This feature depends on Redis, please see https://laravel.com/docs/7.x/redis
        'global_lock'     => false,
        'global_lock_key' => config('app.name', 'Laravel'),
    ],
    // ...
];

3.Note: it will launch multiple timers when build the server cluster, so you need to make sure that launch one timer only to avoid running repetitive task.

4.LaravelS v3.4.0 starts to support the hot restart [Reload] Timer process. After LaravelS receives the SIGUSR1 signal, it waits for max_wait_time(default 5) seconds to end the process, then the Manager process will pull up the Timer process again.

5.If you only need to use minute-level scheduled tasks, it is recommended to enable Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Illuminate\LaravelScheduleJob instead of Linux Crontab, so that you can follow the coding habits of Laravel task scheduling and configure Kernel.

// app/Console/Kernel.php
protected function schedule(Schedule $schedule)
{
    // runInBackground() will start a new child process to execute the task. This is asynchronous and will not affect the execution timing of other tasks.
    $schedule->command(TestCommand::class)->runInBackground()->everyMinute();
}

Automatically reload after modifying code

Via inotify, support Linux only.

1.Install inotify extension.

2.Turn on the switch in Settings.

3.Notice: Modify the file only in Linux to receive the file change events. It's recommended to use the latest Docker. Vagrant Solution.

Via fswatch, support OS X/Linux/Windows.

1.Install fswatch.

2.Run command in your project root directory.

# Watch current directory
./bin/fswatch
# Watch app directory
./bin/fswatch ./app

Via inotifywait, support Linux.

1.Install inotify-tools.

2.Run command in your project root directory.

# Watch current directory
./bin/inotify
# Watch app directory
./bin/inotify ./app

When the above methods does not work, the ultimate solution: set max_request=1,worker_num=1, so that Worker process will restart after processing a request. The performance of this method is very poor, so only development environment use.

Get the instance of SwooleServer in your project

/**
 * $swoole is the instance of `Swoole\WebSocket\Server` if enable WebSocket server, otherwise `Swoole\Http\Server`
 * @var \Swoole\WebSocket\Server|\Swoole\Http\Server $swoole
 */
$swoole = app('swoole');
var_dump($swoole->stats());
$swoole->push($fd, 'Push WebSocket message');

Use SwooleTable

1.Define Table, support multiple.

All defined tables will be created before Swoole starting.

// in file "config/laravels.php"
[
    // ...
    'swoole_tables'  => [
        // Scene:bind UserId & FD in WebSocket
        'ws' => [// The Key is table name, will add suffix "Table" to avoid naming conflicts. Here defined a table named "wsTable"
            'size'   => 102400,// The max size
            'column' => [// Define the columns
                ['name' => 'value', 'type' => \Swoole\Table::TYPE_INT, 'size' => 8],
            ],
        ],
        //...Define the other tables
    ],
    // ...
];

2.Access Table: all table instances will be bound on SwooleServer, access by app('swoole')->xxxTable.

namespace App\Services;
use Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Swoole\WebSocketHandlerInterface;
use Swoole\Http\Request;
use Swoole\WebSocket\Frame;
use Swoole\WebSocket\Server;
class WebSocketService implements WebSocketHandlerInterface
{
    /**@var \Swoole\Table $wsTable */
    private $wsTable;
    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->wsTable = app('swoole')->wsTable;
    }
    // Scene:bind UserId & FD in WebSocket
    public function onOpen(Server $server, Request $request)
    {
        // var_dump(app('swoole') === $server);// The same instance
        /**
         * Get the currently logged in user
         * This feature requires that the path to establish a WebSocket connection go through middleware such as Authenticate.
         * E.g:
         * Browser side: var ws = new WebSocket("ws://127.0.0.1:5200/ws");
         * Then the /ws route in Laravel needs to add the middleware like Authenticate.
         * Route::get('/ws', function () {
         *     // Respond any content with status code 200
         *     return 'websocket';
         * })->middleware(['auth']);
         */
        // $user = Auth::user();
        // $userId = $user ? $user->id : 0; // 0 means a guest user who is not logged in
        $userId = mt_rand(1000, 10000);
        // if (!$userId) {
        //     // Disconnect the connections of unlogged users
        //     $server->disconnect($request->fd);
        //     return;
        // }
        $this->wsTable->set('uid:' . $userId, ['value' => $request->fd]);// Bind map uid to fd
        $this->wsTable->set('fd:' . $request->fd, ['value' => $userId]);// Bind map fd to uid
        $server->push($request->fd, "Welcome to LaravelS #{$request->fd}");
    }
    public function onMessage(Server $server, Frame $frame)
    {
        // Broadcast
        foreach ($this->wsTable as $key => $row) {
            if (strpos($key, 'uid:') === 0 && $server->isEstablished($row['value'])) {
                $content = sprintf('Broadcast: new message "%s" from #%d', $frame->data, $frame->fd);
                $server->push($row['value'], $content);
            }
        }
    }
    public function onClose(Server $server, $fd, $reactorId)
    {
        $uid = $this->wsTable->get('fd:' . $fd);
        if ($uid !== false) {
            $this->wsTable->del('uid:' . $uid['value']); // Unbind uid map
        }
        $this->wsTable->del('fd:' . $fd);// Unbind fd map
        $server->push($fd, "Goodbye #{$fd}");
    }
}

Multi-port mixed protocol

For more information, please refer to Swoole Server AddListener

To make our main server support more protocols not just Http and WebSocket, we bring the feature multi-port mixed protocol of Swoole in LaravelS and name it Socket. Now, you can build TCP/UDP applications easily on top of Laravel.

Create Socket handler class, and extend Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Swoole\Socket\{TcpSocket|UdpSocket|Http|WebSocket}.

namespace App\Sockets;
use Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Swoole\Socket\TcpSocket;
use Swoole\Server;
class TestTcpSocket extends TcpSocket
{
    public function onConnect(Server $server, $fd, $reactorId)
    {
        \Log::info('New TCP connection', [$fd]);
        $server->send($fd, 'Welcome to LaravelS.');
    }
    public function onReceive(Server $server, $fd, $reactorId, $data)
    {
        \Log::info('Received data', [$fd, $data]);
        $server->send($fd, 'LaravelS: ' . $data);
        if ($data === "quit\r\n") {
            $server->send($fd, 'LaravelS: bye' . PHP_EOL);
            $server->close($fd);
        }
    }
    public function onClose(Server $server, $fd, $reactorId)
    {
        \Log::info('Close TCP connection', [$fd]);
        $server->send($fd, 'Goodbye');
    }
}

These Socket connections share the same worker processes with your HTTP/WebSocket connections. So it won't be a problem at all if you want to deliver tasks, use SwooleTable, even Laravel components such as DB, Eloquent and so on. At the same time, you can access Swoole\Server\Port object directly by member property swoolePort.

public function onReceive(Server $server, $fd, $reactorId, $data)
{
    $port = $this->swoolePort; // Get the `Swoole\Server\Port` object
}
namespace App\Http\Controllers;
class TestController extends Controller
{
    public function test()
    {
        /**@var \Swoole\Http\Server|\Swoole\WebSocket\Server $swoole */
        $swoole = app('swoole');
        // $swoole->ports: Traverse all Port objects, https://www.swoole.co.uk/docs/modules/swoole-server/multiple-ports
        $port = $swoole->ports[0]; // Get the `Swoole\Server\Port` object, $port[0] is the port of the main server
        foreach ($port->connections as $fd) { // Traverse all connections
            // $swoole->send($fd, 'Send tcp message');
            // if($swoole->isEstablished($fd)) {
            //     $swoole->push($fd, 'Send websocket message');
            // }
        }
    }
}

Register Sockets.

// Edit `config/laravels.php`
//...
'sockets' => [
    [
        'host'     => '127.0.0.1',
        'port'     => 5291,
        'type'     => SWOOLE_SOCK_TCP,// Socket type: SWOOLE_SOCK_TCP/SWOOLE_SOCK_TCP6/SWOOLE_SOCK_UDP/SWOOLE_SOCK_UDP6/SWOOLE_UNIX_DGRAM/SWOOLE_UNIX_STREAM
        'settings' => [// Swoole settings:https://www.swoole.co.uk/docs/modules/swoole-server-methods#swoole_server-addlistener
            'open_eof_check' => true,
            'package_eof'    => "\r\n",
        ],
        'handler'  => \App\Sockets\TestTcpSocket::class,
        'enable'   => true, // whether to enable, default true
    ],
],

About the heartbeat configuration, it can only be set on the main server and cannot be configured on Socket, but the Socket inherits the heartbeat configuration of the main server.

For TCP socket, onConnect and onClose events will be blocked when dispatch_mode of Swoole is 1/3, so if you want to unblock these two events please set dispatch_mode to 2/4/5.

'swoole' => [
    //...
    'dispatch_mode' => 2,
    //...
];

Test.

TCP: telnet 127.0.0.1 5291

UDP: [Linux] echo "Hello LaravelS" > /dev/udp/127.0.0.1/5292

Register example of other protocols.

  • UDP
  • Http
  • WebSocket: The main server must turn on WebSocket, that is, set websocket.enable to true.

Coroutine

Swoole Coroutine

Warning: The order of code execution in the coroutine is out of order. The data of the request level should be isolated by the coroutine ID. However, there are many singleton and static attributes in Laravel/Lumen, the data between different requests will affect each other, it's Unsafe. For example, the database connection is a singleton, the same database connection shares the same PDO resource. This is fine in the synchronous blocking mode, but it does not work in the asynchronous coroutine mode. Each query needs to create different connections and maintain IO state of different connections, which requires a connection pool.

DO NOT enable the coroutine, only the custom process can use the coroutine.

Custom process

Support developers to create special work processes for monitoring, reporting, or other special tasks. Refer addProcess.

Create Proccess class, implements CustomProcessInterface.

namespace App\Processes;
use App\Tasks\TestTask;
use Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Swoole\Process\CustomProcessInterface;
use Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Swoole\Task\Task;
use Swoole\Coroutine;
use Swoole\Http\Server;
use Swoole\Process;
class TestProcess implements CustomProcessInterface
{
    /**
     * @var bool Quit tag for Reload updates
     */
    private static $quit = false;

    public static function callback(Server $swoole, Process $process)
    {
        // The callback method cannot exit. Once exited, Manager process will automatically create the process 
        while (!self::$quit) {
            \Log::info('Test process: running');
            // sleep(1); // Swoole < 2.1
            Coroutine::sleep(1); // Swoole>=2.1: Coroutine & Runtime will be automatically enabled for callback().
             // Deliver task in custom process, but NOT support callback finish() of task.
            // Note: Modify task_ipc_mode to 1 or 2 in config/laravels.php, see https://www.swoole.co.uk/docs/modules/swoole-server/configuration
            $ret = Task::deliver(new TestTask('task data'));
            var_dump($ret);
            // The upper layer will catch the exception thrown in the callback and record it in the Swoole log, and then this process will exit. The Manager process will re-create the process after 3 seconds, so developers need to try/catch to catch the exception by themselves to avoid frequent process creation.
            // throw new \Exception('an exception');
        }
    }
    // Requirements: LaravelS >= v3.4.0 & callback() must be async non-blocking program.
    public static function onReload(Server $swoole, Process $process)
    {
        // Stop the process...
        // Then end process
        \Log::info('Test process: reloading');
        self::$quit = true;
        // $process->exit(0); // Force exit process
    }
    // Requirements: LaravelS >= v3.7.4 & callback() must be async non-blocking program.
    public static function onStop(Server $swoole, Process $process)
    {
        // Stop the process...
        // Then end process
        \Log::info('Test process: stopping');
        self::$quit = true;
        // $process->exit(0); // Force exit process
    }
}

Register TestProcess.

// Edit `config/laravels.php`
// ...
'processes' => [
    'test' => [ // Key name is process name
        'class'    => \App\Processes\TestProcess::class,
        'redirect' => false, // Whether redirect stdin/stdout, true or false
        'pipe'     => 0,     // The type of pipeline, 0: no pipeline 1: SOCK_STREAM 2: SOCK_DGRAM
        'enable'   => true,  // Whether to enable, default true
        //'num'    => 3   // To create multiple processes of this class, default is 1
        //'queue'    => [ // Enable message queue as inter-process communication, configure empty array means use default parameters
        //    'msg_key'  => 0,    // The key of the message queue. Default: ftok(__FILE__, 1).
        //    'mode'     => 2,    // Communication mode, default is 2, which means contention mode
        //    'capacity' => 8192, // The length of a single message, is limited by the operating system kernel parameters. The default is 8192, and the maximum is 65536
        //],
        //'restart_interval' => 5, // After the process exits abnormally, how many seconds to wait before restarting the process, default 5 seconds
    ],
],

Note: The callback() cannot quit. If quit, the Manager process will re-create the process.

Example: Write data to a custom process.

// config/laravels.php
'processes' => [
    'test' => [
        'class'    => \App\Processes\TestProcess::class,
        'redirect' => false,
        'pipe'     => 1,
    ],
],
// app/Processes/TestProcess.php
public static function callback(Server $swoole, Process $process)
{
    while ($data = $process->read()) {
        \Log::info('TestProcess: read data', [$data]);
        $process->write('TestProcess: ' . $data);
    }
}
// app/Http/Controllers/TestController.php
public function testProcessWrite()
{
    /**@var \Swoole\Process $process */
    $process = app('swoole')->customProcesses['test'];
    $process->write('TestController: write data' . time());
    var_dump($process->read());
}

Common components

Apollo

LaravelS will pull the Apollo configuration and write it to the .env file when starting. At the same time, LaravelS will start the custom process apollo to monitor the configuration and automatically reload when the configuration changes.

Enable Apollo: add --enable-apollo and Apollo parameters to the startup parameters.

php bin/laravels start --enable-apollo --apollo-server=http://127.0.0.1:8080 --apollo-app-id=LARAVEL-S-TEST

Support hot updates(optional).

// Edit `config/laravels.php`
'processes' => Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Components\Apollo\Process::getDefinition(),
// When there are other custom process configurations
'processes' => [
    'test' => [
        'class'    => \App\Processes\TestProcess::class,
        'redirect' => false,
        'pipe'     => 1,
    ],
    // ...
] + Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Components\Apollo\Process::getDefinition(),

List of available parameters.

ParameterDescriptionDefaultDemo
apollo-serverApollo server URL---apollo-server=http://127.0.0.1:8080
apollo-app-idApollo APP ID---apollo-app-id=LARAVEL-S-TEST
apollo-namespacesThe namespace to which the APP belongs, support specify the multipleapplication--apollo-namespaces=application --apollo-namespaces=env
apollo-clusterThe cluster to which the APP belongsdefault--apollo-cluster=default
apollo-client-ipIP of current instance, can also be used for grayscale publishingLocal intranet IP--apollo-client-ip=10.2.1.83
apollo-pull-timeoutTimeout time(seconds) when pulling configuration5--apollo-pull-timeout=5
apollo-backup-old-envWhether to backup the old configuration file when updating the configuration file .envfalse--apollo-backup-old-env

Prometheus

Support Prometheus monitoring and alarm, Grafana visually view monitoring metrics. Please refer to Docker Compose for the environment construction of Prometheus and Grafana.

Require extension APCu >= 5.0.0, please install it by pecl install apcu.

Copy the configuration file prometheus.php to the config directory of your project. Modify the configuration as appropriate.

# Execute commands in the project root directory
cp vendor/hhxsv5/laravel-s/config/prometheus.php config/

If your project is Lumen, you also need to manually load the configuration $app->configure('prometheus'); in bootstrap/app.php.

Configure global middleware: Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Components\Prometheus\RequestMiddleware::class. In order to count the request time consumption as accurately as possible, RequestMiddleware must be the first global middleware, which needs to be placed in front of other middleware.

Register ServiceProvider: Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Components\Prometheus\ServiceProvider::class.

Configure the CollectorProcess in config/laravels.php to collect the metrics of Swoole Worker/Task/Timer processes regularly.

'processes' => Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Components\Prometheus\CollectorProcess::getDefinition(),

Create the route to output metrics.

use Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Components\Prometheus\Exporter;

Route::get('/actuator/prometheus', function () {
    $result = app(Exporter::class)->render();
    return response($result, 200, ['Content-Type' => Exporter::REDNER_MIME_TYPE]);
});

Complete the configuration of Prometheus and start it.

global:
  scrape_interval: 5s
  scrape_timeout: 5s
  evaluation_interval: 30s
scrape_configs:
- job_name: laravel-s-test
  honor_timestamps: true
  metrics_path: /actuator/prometheus
  scheme: http
  follow_redirects: true
  static_configs:
  - targets:
    - 127.0.0.1:5200 # The ip and port of the monitored service
# Dynamically discovered using one of the supported service-discovery mechanisms
# https://prometheus.io/docs/prometheus/latest/configuration/configuration/#scrape_config
# - job_name: laravels-eureka
#   honor_timestamps: true
#   scrape_interval: 5s
#   metrics_path: /actuator/prometheus
#   scheme: http
#   follow_redirects: true
  # eureka_sd_configs:
  # - server: http://127.0.0.1:8080/eureka
  #   follow_redirects: true
  #   refresh_interval: 5s

Start Grafana, then import panel json.

Grafana Dashboard

Other features

Configure Swoole events

Supported events:

EventInterfaceWhen happened
ServerStartHhxsv5\LaravelS\Swoole\Events\ServerStartInterfaceOccurs when the Master process is starting, this event should not handle complex business logic, and can only do some simple work of initialization.
ServerStopHhxsv5\LaravelS\Swoole\Events\ServerStopInterfaceOccurs when the server exits normally, CANNOT use async or coroutine related APIs in this event.
WorkerStartHhxsv5\LaravelS\Swoole\Events\WorkerStartInterfaceOccurs after the Worker/Task process is started, and the Laravel initialization has been completed.
WorkerStopHhxsv5\LaravelS\Swoole\Events\WorkerStopInterfaceOccurs after the Worker/Task process exits normally
WorkerErrorHhxsv5\LaravelS\Swoole\Events\WorkerErrorInterfaceOccurs when an exception or fatal error occurs in the Worker/Task process

1.Create an event class to implement the corresponding interface.

namespace App\Events;
use Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Swoole\Events\ServerStartInterface;
use Swoole\Atomic;
use Swoole\Http\Server;
class ServerStartEvent implements ServerStartInterface
{
    public function __construct()
    {
    }
    public function handle(Server $server)
    {
        // Initialize a global counter (available across processes)
        $server->atomicCount = new Atomic(2233);

        // Invoked in controller: app('swoole')->atomicCount->get();
    }
}
namespace App\Events;
use Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Swoole\Events\WorkerStartInterface;
use Swoole\Http\Server;
class WorkerStartEvent implements WorkerStartInterface
{
    public function __construct()
    {
    }
    public function handle(Server $server, $workerId)
    {
        // Initialize a database connection pool
        // DatabaseConnectionPool::init();
    }
}

2.Configuration.

// Edit `config/laravels.php`
'event_handlers' => [
    'ServerStart' => [\App\Events\ServerStartEvent::class], // Trigger events in array order
    'WorkerStart' => [\App\Events\WorkerStartEvent::class],
],

Serverless

Alibaba Cloud Function Compute

Function Compute.

1.Modify bootstrap/app.php and set the storage directory. Because the project directory is read-only, the /tmp directory can only be read and written.

$app->useStoragePath(env('APP_STORAGE_PATH', '/tmp/storage'));

2.Create a shell script laravels_bootstrap and grant executable permission.

#!/usr/bin/env bash
set +e

# Create storage-related directories
mkdir -p /tmp/storage/app/public
mkdir -p /tmp/storage/framework/cache
mkdir -p /tmp/storage/framework/sessions
mkdir -p /tmp/storage/framework/testing
mkdir -p /tmp/storage/framework/views
mkdir -p /tmp/storage/logs

# Set the environment variable APP_STORAGE_PATH, please make sure it's the same as APP_STORAGE_PATH in .env
export APP_STORAGE_PATH=/tmp/storage

# Start LaravelS
php bin/laravels start

3.Configure template.xml.

ROSTemplateFormatVersion: '2015-09-01'
Transform: 'Aliyun::Serverless-2018-04-03'
Resources:
  laravel-s-demo:
    Type: 'Aliyun::Serverless::Service'
    Properties:
      Description: 'LaravelS Demo for Serverless'
    fc-laravel-s:
      Type: 'Aliyun::Serverless::Function'
      Properties:
        Handler: laravels.handler
        Runtime: custom
        MemorySize: 512
        Timeout: 30
        CodeUri: ./
        InstanceConcurrency: 10
        EnvironmentVariables:
          BOOTSTRAP_FILE: laravels_bootstrap

Important notices

Singleton Issue

Under FPM mode, singleton instances will be instantiated and recycled in every request, request start=>instantiate instance=>request end=>recycled instance.

Under Swoole Server, All singleton instances will be held in memory, different lifetime from FPM, request start=>instantiate instance=>request end=>do not recycle singleton instance. So need developer to maintain status of singleton instances in every request.

Common solutions:

Write a XxxCleaner class to clean up the singleton object state. This class implements the interface Hhxsv5\LaravelS\Illuminate\Cleaners\CleanerInterface and then registers it in cleaners of laravels.php.

Reset status of singleton instances by Middleware.

Re-register ServiceProvider, add XxxServiceProvider into register_providers of file laravels.php. So that reinitialize singleton instances in every request Refer.

Cleaners

Configuration cleaners.

Known issues

Known issues: a package of known issues and solutions.

Debugging method

Logging; if you want to output to the console, you can use stderr, Log::channel('stderr')->debug('debug message').

Laravel Dump Server(Laravel 5.7 has been integrated by default).

Read request

Read request by Illuminate\Http\Request Object, $_ENV is readable, $_SERVER is partially readable, CANNOT USE $_GET/$_POST/$_FILES/$_COOKIE/$_REQUEST/$_SESSION/$GLOBALS.

public function form(\Illuminate\Http\Request $request)
{
    $name = $request->input('name');
    $all = $request->all();
    $sessionId = $request->cookie('sessionId');
    $photo = $request->file('photo');
    // Call getContent() to get the raw POST body, instead of file_get_contents('php://input')
    $rawContent = $request->getContent();
    //...
}

Output response

Respond by Illuminate\Http\Response Object, compatible with echo/vardump()/print_r(),CANNOT USE functions dd()/exit()/die()/header()/setcookie()/http_response_code().

public function json()
{
    return response()->json(['time' => time()])->header('header1', 'value1')->withCookie('c1', 'v1');
}

Persistent connection

Singleton connection will be resident in memory, it is recommended to turn on persistent connection for better performance.

  1. Database connection, it will reconnect automatically immediately after disconnect.
// config/database.php
'connections' => [
    'my_conn' => [
        'driver'    => 'mysql',
        'host'      => env('DB_MY_CONN_HOST', 'localhost'),
        'port'      => env('DB_MY_CONN_PORT', 3306),
        'database'  => env('DB_MY_CONN_DATABASE', 'forge'),
        'username'  => env('DB_MY_CONN_USERNAME', 'forge'),
        'password'  => env('DB_MY_CONN_PASSWORD', ''),
        'charset'   => 'utf8mb4',
        'collation' => 'utf8mb4_unicode_ci',
        'prefix'    => '',
        'strict'    => false,
        'options'   => [
            // Enable persistent connection
            \PDO::ATTR_PERSISTENT => true,
        ],
    ],
],
  1. Redis connection, it won't reconnect automatically immediately after disconnect, and will throw an exception about lost connection, reconnect next time. You need to make sure that SELECT DB correctly before operating Redis every time.
// config/database.php
'redis' => [
    'client' => env('REDIS_CLIENT', 'phpredis'), // It is recommended to use phpredis for better performance.
    'default' => [
        'host'       => env('REDIS_HOST', 'localhost'),
        'password'   => env('REDIS_PASSWORD', null),
        'port'       => env('REDIS_PORT', 6379),
        'database'   => 0,
        'persistent' => true, // Enable persistent connection
    ],
],

About memory leaks

Avoid using global variables. If necessary, please clean or reset them manually.

Infinitely appending element into static/global variable will lead to OOM(Out of Memory).

class Test
{
    public static $array = [];
    public static $string = '';
}

// Controller
public function test(Request $req)
{
    // Out of Memory
    Test::$array[] = $req->input('param1');
    Test::$string .= $req->input('param2');
}

Memory leak detection method

Modify config/laravels.php: worker_num=1, max_request=1000000, remember to change it back after test;

Add routing /debug-memory-leak without route middleware to observe the memory changes of the Worker process;

Start LaravelS and request /debug-memory-leak until diff_mem is less than or equal to zero; if diff_mem is always greater than zero, it means that there may be a memory leak in Global Middleware or Laravel Framework;

After completing Step 3, alternately request the business routes and /debug-memory-leak (It is recommended to use ab/wrk to make a large number of requests for business routes), the initial increase in memory is normal. After a large number of requests for the business routes, if diff_mem is always greater than zero and curr_mem continues to increase, there is a high probability of memory leak; If curr_mem always changes within a certain range and does not continue to increase, there is a low probability of memory leak.

If you still can't solve it, max_request is the last guarantee.

Linux kernel parameter adjustment

Linux kernel parameter adjustment

Pressure test

Pressure test

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Author: hhxsv5
Source Code: https://github.com/hhxsv5/laravel-s 
License: MIT License

#php #laravel #http