Justen  Hintz

Justen Hintz

1550136288

Can we make a JavaScript program that saves the work done by the user?

#javascript

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Adam Daniels

1550147894

Indeed you can! However, just like Reggev Amsalem mentioned, you do not want to save their work for every keystroke. Instead, you probably want to wait for x seconds before saving their works. Here is a quick snippet for it that will wait for x seconds before doing something, (I remember I copied it from somewhere else, but I cannot seem to find the origin/site again)

var typingTimer; //timer identifier
var doneTypingInterval = 5000; //time in ms, 5 second for example
var $input = $('input[name=someForm]');
 
$input.on('keyup', function () {
  clearTimeout(typingTimer);
  typingTimer = setTimeout(doneTyping, doneTypingInterval);
});
 
$input.on('keydown', function () {
 clearTimeout(typingTimer);
});
 
function doneTyping () {
  // do something
  // maybe save it to localStorage or IndexedDB
}

The *doneTyping function *will get called after the user finished typing for 5 seconds.

Inside the function, you can probably save the user’s work in localStorage or IndexedDB (as mentioned from others)*. *However, I would personally recommend *IndexedDB *because it is done *asynchronously *while the *localStorage *calls are *synchronous. *Depends on your situation and how small you set your *doneTypingInterval, *it could be very expensive (performance-wise) when you set it to less than 1 second and use localStorage to save their work (Calling *synchronous *calls every second might not be the best idea in the world). This is probably the easiest solution that I can think of that will allows user to save the work they done.

Keep in mind that localStorage and *IndexedDB *are not permanent storage. Any one could erase them easily. Your better bet is to call an API request along with user’s work to save it into the DB.

P.S. I recently did a progressive web app to-do list (still in progress) that will save user’s each to-do into IndexedDB before saving them into the database. Here is the code, poanchen/pwa-to-do-list in case you need some direction on how to use IndexedDB.

Sasha  Roberts

Sasha Roberts

1659500100

Reform: Form Objects Decoupled From Models In Ruby

Reform

Form objects decoupled from your models.

Reform gives you a form object with validations and nested setup of models. It is completely framework-agnostic and doesn't care about your database.

Although reform can be used in any Ruby framework, it comes with Rails support, works with simple_form and other form gems, allows nesting forms to implement has_one and has_many relationships, can compose a form from multiple objects and gives you coercion.

Full Documentation

Reform is part of the Trailblazer framework. Full documentation is available on the project site.

Reform 2.2

Temporary note: Reform 2.2 does not automatically load Rails files anymore (e.g. ActiveModel::Validations). You need the reform-rails gem, see Installation.

Defining Forms

Forms are defined in separate classes. Often, these classes partially map to a model.

class AlbumForm < Reform::Form
  property :title
  validates :title, presence: true
end

Fields are declared using ::property. Validations work exactly as you know it from Rails or other frameworks. Note that validations no longer go into the model.

The API

Forms have a ridiculously simple API with only a handful of public methods.

  1. #initialize always requires a model that the form represents.
  2. #validate(params) updates the form's fields with the input data (only the form, not the model) and then runs all validations. The return value is the boolean result of the validations.
  3. #errors returns validation messages in a classic ActiveModel style.
  4. #sync writes form data back to the model. This will only use setter methods on the model(s).
  5. #save (optional) will call #save on the model and nested models. Note that this implies a #sync call.
  6. #prepopulate! (optional) will run pre-population hooks to "fill out" your form before rendering.

In addition to the main API, forms expose accessors to the defined properties. This is used for rendering or manual operations.

Setup

In your controller or operation you create a form instance and pass in the models you want to work on.

class AlbumsController
  def new
    @form = AlbumForm.new(Album.new)
  end

This will also work as an editing form with an existing album.

def edit
  @form = AlbumForm.new(Album.find(1))
end

Reform will read property values from the model in setup. In our example, the AlbumForm will call album.title to populate the title field.

Rendering Forms

Your @form is now ready to be rendered, either do it yourself or use something like Rails' #form_for, simple_form or formtastic.

= form_for @form do |f|
  = f.input :title

Nested forms and collections can be easily rendered with fields_for, etc. Note that you no longer pass the model to the form builder, but the Reform instance.

Optionally, you might want to use the #prepopulate! method to pre-populate fields and prepare the form for rendering.

Validation

After form submission, you need to validate the input.

class SongsController
  def create
    @form = SongForm.new(Song.new)

    #=> params: {song: {title: "Rio", length: "366"}}

    if @form.validate(params[:song])

The #validate method first updates the values of the form - the underlying model is still treated as immutuable and remains unchanged. It then runs all validations you provided in the form.

It's the only entry point for updating the form. This is per design, as separating writing and validation doesn't make sense for a form.

This allows rendering the form after validate with the data that has been submitted. However, don't get confused, the model's values are still the old, original values and are only changed after a #save or #sync operation.

Syncing Back

After validation, you have two choices: either call #save and let Reform sort out the rest. Or call #sync, which will write all the properties back to the model. In a nested form, this works recursively, of course.

It's then up to you what to do with the updated models - they're still unsaved.

Saving Forms

The easiest way to save the data is to call #save on the form.

if @form.validate(params[:song])
  @form.save  #=> populates album with incoming data
              #   by calling @form.album.title=.
else
  # handle validation errors.
end

This will sync the data to the model and then call album.save.

Sometimes, you need to do saving manually.

Default values

Reform allows default values to be provided for properties.

class AlbumForm < Reform::Form
  property :price_in_cents, default: 9_95
end

Saving Forms Manually

Calling #save with a block will provide a nested hash of the form's properties and values. This does not call #save on the models and allows you to implement the saving yourself.

The block parameter is a nested hash of the form input.

  @form.save do |hash|
    hash      #=> {title: "Greatest Hits"}
    Album.create(hash)
  end

You can always access the form's model. This is helpful when you were using populators to set up objects when validating.

  @form.save do |hash|
    album = @form.model

    album.update_attributes(hash[:album])
  end

Nesting

Reform provides support for nested objects. Let's say the Album model keeps some associations.

class Album < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_one  :artist
  has_many :songs
end

The implementation details do not really matter here, as long as your album exposes readers and writes like Album#artist and Album#songs, this allows you to define nested forms.

class AlbumForm < Reform::Form
  property :title
  validates :title, presence: true

  property :artist do
    property :full_name
    validates :full_name, presence: true
  end

  collection :songs do
    property :name
  end
end

You can also reuse an existing form from elsewhere using :form.

property :artist, form: ArtistForm

Nested Setup

Reform will wrap defined nested objects in their own forms. This happens automatically when instantiating the form.

album.songs #=> [<Song name:"Run To The Hills">]

form = AlbumForm.new(album)
form.songs[0] #=> <SongForm model: <Song name:"Run To The Hills">>
form.songs[0].name #=> "Run To The Hills"

Nested Rendering

When rendering a nested form you can use the form's readers to access the nested forms.

= text_field :title,         @form.title
= text_field "artist[name]", @form.artist.name

Or use something like #fields_for in a Rails environment.

= form_for @form do |f|
  = f.text_field :title

  = f.fields_for :artist do |a|
    = a.text_field :name

Nested Processing

validate will assign values to the nested forms. sync and save work analogue to the non-nested form, just in a recursive way.

The block form of #save would give you the following data.

@form.save do |nested|
  nested #=> {title:  "Greatest Hits",
         #    artist: {name: "Duran Duran"},
         #    songs: [{title: "Hungry Like The Wolf"},
         #            {title: "Last Chance On The Stairways"}]
         #   }
  end

The manual saving with block is not encouraged. You should rather check the Disposable docs to find out how to implement your manual tweak with the official API.

Populating Forms

Very often, you need to give Reform some information how to create or find nested objects when validateing. This directive is called populator and documented here.

Installation

Add this line to your Gemfile:

gem "reform"

Reform works fine with Rails 3.1-5.0. However, inheritance of validations with ActiveModel::Validations is broken in Rails 3.2 and 4.0.

Since Reform 2.2, you have to add the reform-rails gem to your Gemfile to automatically load ActiveModel/Rails files.

gem "reform-rails"

Since Reform 2.0 you need to specify which validation backend you want to use (unless you're in a Rails environment where ActiveModel will be used).

To use ActiveModel (not recommended because very out-dated).

require "reform/form/active_model/validations"
Reform::Form.class_eval do
  include Reform::Form::ActiveModel::Validations
end

To use dry-validation (recommended).

require "reform/form/dry"
Reform::Form.class_eval do
  feature Reform::Form::Dry
end

Put this in an initializer or on top of your script.

Compositions

Reform allows to map multiple models to one form. The complete documentation is here, however, this is how it works.

class AlbumForm < Reform::Form
  include Composition

  property :id,    on: :album
  property :title, on: :album
  property :songs, on: :cd
  property :cd_id, on: :cd, from: :id
end

When initializing a composition, you have to pass a hash that contains the composees.

AlbumForm.new(album: album, cd: CD.find(1))

More

Reform comes many more optional features, like hash fields, coercion, virtual fields, and so on. Check the full documentation here.

Reform is part of the Trailblazer project. Please buy my book to support the development and learn everything about Reform - there's two chapters dedicated to Reform!

Security And Strong_parameters

By explicitly defining the form layout using ::property there is no more need for protecting from unwanted input. strong_parameter or attr_accessible become obsolete. Reform will simply ignore undefined incoming parameters.

This is not Reform 1.x!

Temporary note: This is the README and API for Reform 2. On the public API, only a few tiny things have changed. Here are the Reform 1.2 docs.

Anyway, please upgrade and report problems and do not simply assume that we will magically find out what needs to get fixed. When in trouble, join us on Gitter.

Full documentation for Reform is available online, or support us and grab the Trailblazer book. There is an Upgrading Guide to help you migrate through versions.

Attributions!!!

Great thanks to Blake Education for giving us the freedom and time to develop this project in 2013 while working on their project.


Author: trailblazer
Source code: https://github.com/trailblazer/reform
License:  MIT license

#ruby  #ruby-on-rails

Dylan  Iqbal

Dylan Iqbal

1561523460

Matplotlib Cheat Sheet: Plotting in Python

This Matplotlib cheat sheet introduces you to the basics that you need to plot your data with Python and includes code samples.

Data visualization and storytelling with your data are essential skills that every data scientist needs to communicate insights gained from analyses effectively to any audience out there. 

For most beginners, the first package that they use to get in touch with data visualization and storytelling is, naturally, Matplotlib: it is a Python 2D plotting library that enables users to make publication-quality figures. But, what might be even more convincing is the fact that other packages, such as Pandas, intend to build more plotting integration with Matplotlib as time goes on.

However, what might slow down beginners is the fact that this package is pretty extensive. There is so much that you can do with it and it might be hard to still keep a structure when you're learning how to work with Matplotlib.   

DataCamp has created a Matplotlib cheat sheet for those who might already know how to use the package to their advantage to make beautiful plots in Python, but that still want to keep a one-page reference handy. Of course, for those who don't know how to work with Matplotlib, this might be the extra push be convinced and to finally get started with data visualization in Python. 

You'll see that this cheat sheet presents you with the six basic steps that you can go through to make beautiful plots. 

Check out the infographic by clicking on the button below:

Python Matplotlib cheat sheet

With this handy reference, you'll familiarize yourself in no time with the basics of Matplotlib: you'll learn how you can prepare your data, create a new plot, use some basic plotting routines to your advantage, add customizations to your plots, and save, show and close the plots that you make.

What might have looked difficult before will definitely be more clear once you start using this cheat sheet! Use it in combination with the Matplotlib Gallery, the documentation.

Matplotlib 

Matplotlib is a Python 2D plotting library which produces publication-quality figures in a variety of hardcopy formats and interactive environments across platforms.

Prepare the Data 

1D Data 

>>> import numpy as np
>>> x = np.linspace(0, 10, 100)
>>> y = np.cos(x)
>>> z = np.sin(x)

2D Data or Images 

>>> data = 2 * np.random.random((10, 10))
>>> data2 = 3 * np.random.random((10, 10))
>>> Y, X = np.mgrid[-3:3:100j, -3:3:100j]
>>> U = 1 X** 2 + Y
>>> V = 1 + X Y**2
>>> from matplotlib.cbook import get_sample_data
>>> img = np.load(get_sample_data('axes_grid/bivariate_normal.npy'))

Create Plot

>>> import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

Figure 

>>> fig = plt.figure()
>>> fig2 = plt.figure(figsize=plt.figaspect(2.0))

Axes 

>>> fig.add_axes()
>>> ax1 = fig.add_subplot(221) #row-col-num
>>> ax3 = fig.add_subplot(212)
>>> fig3, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2,ncols=2)
>>> fig4, axes2 = plt.subplots(ncols=3)

Save Plot 

>>> plt.savefig('foo.png') #Save figures
>>> plt.savefig('foo.png',  transparent=True) #Save transparent figures

Show Plot

>>> plt.show()

Plotting Routines 

1D Data 

>>> fig, ax = plt.subplots()
>>> lines = ax.plot(x,y) #Draw points with lines or markers connecting them
>>> ax.scatter(x,y) #Draw unconnected points, scaled or colored
>>> axes[0,0].bar([1,2,3],[3,4,5]) #Plot vertical rectangles (constant width)
>>> axes[1,0].barh([0.5,1,2.5],[0,1,2]) #Plot horiontal rectangles (constant height)
>>> axes[1,1].axhline(0.45) #Draw a horizontal line across axes
>>> axes[0,1].axvline(0.65) #Draw a vertical line across axes
>>> ax.fill(x,y,color='blue') #Draw filled polygons
>>> ax.fill_between(x,y,color='yellow') #Fill between y values and 0

2D Data 

>>> fig, ax = plt.subplots()
>>> im = ax.imshow(img, #Colormapped or RGB arrays
      cmap= 'gist_earth', 
      interpolation= 'nearest',
      vmin=-2,
      vmax=2)
>>> axes2[0].pcolor(data2) #Pseudocolor plot of 2D array
>>> axes2[0].pcolormesh(data) #Pseudocolor plot of 2D array
>>> CS = plt.contour(Y,X,U) #Plot contours
>>> axes2[2].contourf(data1) #Plot filled contours
>>> axes2[2]= ax.clabel(CS) #Label a contour plot

Vector Fields 

>>> axes[0,1].arrow(0,0,0.5,0.5) #Add an arrow to the axes
>>> axes[1,1].quiver(y,z) #Plot a 2D field of arrows
>>> axes[0,1].streamplot(X,Y,U,V) #Plot a 2D field of arrows

Data Distributions 

>>> ax1.hist(y) #Plot a histogram
>>> ax3.boxplot(y) #Make a box and whisker plot
>>> ax3.violinplot(z)  #Make a violin plot

Plot Anatomy & Workflow 

Plot Anatomy 

 y-axis      

                           x-axis 

Workflow 

The basic steps to creating plots with matplotlib are:

1 Prepare Data
2 Create Plot
3 Plot
4 Customized Plot
5 Save Plot
6 Show Plot

>>> import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
>>> x = [1,2,3,4]  #Step 1
>>> y = [10,20,25,30] 
>>> fig = plt.figure() #Step 2
>>> ax = fig.add_subplot(111) #Step 3
>>> ax.plot(x, y, color= 'lightblue', linewidth=3)  #Step 3, 4
>>> ax.scatter([2,4,6],
          [5,15,25],
          color= 'darkgreen',
          marker= '^' )
>>> ax.set_xlim(1, 6.5)
>>> plt.savefig('foo.png' ) #Step 5
>>> plt.show() #Step 6

Close and Clear 

>>> plt.cla()  #Clear an axis
>>> plt.clf(). #Clear the entire figure
>>> plt.close(). #Close a window

Plotting Customize Plot 

Colors, Color Bars & Color Maps 

>>> plt.plot(x, x, x, x**2, x, x** 3)
>>> ax.plot(x, y, alpha = 0.4)
>>> ax.plot(x, y, c= 'k')
>>> fig.colorbar(im, orientation= 'horizontal')
>>> im = ax.imshow(img,
            cmap= 'seismic' )

Markers 

>>> fig, ax = plt.subplots()
>>> ax.scatter(x,y,marker= ".")
>>> ax.plot(x,y,marker= "o")

Linestyles 

>>> plt.plot(x,y,linewidth=4.0)
>>> plt.plot(x,y,ls= 'solid') 
>>> plt.plot(x,y,ls= '--') 
>>> plt.plot(x,y,'--' ,x**2,y**2,'-.' ) 
>>> plt.setp(lines,color= 'r',linewidth=4.0)

Text & Annotations 

>>> ax.text(1,
           -2.1, 
           'Example Graph', 
            style= 'italic' )
>>> ax.annotate("Sine", 
xy=(8, 0),
xycoords= 'data', 
xytext=(10.5, 0),
textcoords= 'data', 
arrowprops=dict(arrowstyle= "->", 
connectionstyle="arc3"),)

Mathtext 

>>> plt.title(r '$sigma_i=15$', fontsize=20)

Limits, Legends and Layouts 

Limits & Autoscaling 

>>> ax.margins(x=0.0,y=0.1) #Add padding to a plot
>>> ax.axis('equal')  #Set the aspect ratio of the plot to 1
>>> ax.set(xlim=[0,10.5],ylim=[-1.5,1.5])  #Set limits for x-and y-axis
>>> ax.set_xlim(0,10.5) #Set limits for x-axis

Legends 

>>> ax.set(title= 'An Example Axes',  #Set a title and x-and y-axis labels
            ylabel= 'Y-Axis', 
            xlabel= 'X-Axis')
>>> ax.legend(loc= 'best')  #No overlapping plot elements

Ticks 

>>> ax.xaxis.set(ticks=range(1,5),  #Manually set x-ticks
             ticklabels=[3,100, 12,"foo" ])
>>> ax.tick_params(axis= 'y', #Make y-ticks longer and go in and out
             direction= 'inout', 
              length=10)

Subplot Spacing 

>>> fig3.subplots_adjust(wspace=0.5,   #Adjust the spacing between subplots
             hspace=0.3,
             left=0.125,
             right=0.9,
             top=0.9,
             bottom=0.1)
>>> fig.tight_layout() #Fit subplot(s) in to the figure area

Axis Spines 

>>> ax1.spines[ 'top'].set_visible(False) #Make the top axis line for a plot invisible
>>> ax1.spines['bottom' ].set_position(( 'outward',10))  #Move the bottom axis line outward

Have this Cheat Sheet at your fingertips

Original article source at https://www.datacamp.com

#matplotlib #cheatsheet #python

Lowa Alice

Lowa Alice

1624384800

Object-oriented Programming in JavaScript: Made Super Simple. DO NOT MISS!!!

Object-oriented programming in JavaScript: learn all about objects, prototypes, prototypical inheritance, this and more.
TABLE OF CONTENT:

00:00: What is OOP?
01:46: Four Pillars of OOP
08:50: Setting Up the Development Environment 11:07: Objects
11:53: Object Literals
14:58: Factories
17:50: Constructors
23:27: Constructor Property
25:53: Functions are Objects
31:09: Value vs Reference Types
37:00: Adding or Removing Properties
40:54: Enumerating Properties
43:45: Abstraction
47:48: Private Properties and Methods
51:55: Getters and Setters
57:32: Exercise
59:42: Solution

📺 The video in this post was made by Programming with Mosh
The origin of the article: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PFmuCDHHpwk&list=PLTjRvDozrdlxEIuOBZkMAK5uiqp8rHUax&index=3
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#javascript #object-oriented programming #object-oriented programming in javascript #object-oriented programming in javascript: made super simple

Sival Alethea

Sival Alethea

1624298400

Learn JavaScript - Full Course for Beginners. DO NOT MISS!!!

This complete 134-part JavaScript tutorial for beginners will teach you everything you need to know to get started with the JavaScript programming language.
⭐️Course Contents⭐️
0:00:00 Introduction
0:01:24 Running JavaScript
0:04:23 Comment Your Code
0:05:56 Declare Variables
0:06:15 Storing Values with the Assignment Operator
0:11:31 Initializing Variables with the Assignment Operator
0:11:58 Uninitialized Variables
0:12:40 Case Sensitivity in Variables
0:14:05 Add Two Numbers
0:14:34 Subtract One Number from Another
0:14:52 Multiply Two Numbers
0:15:12 Dividing Numbers
0:15:30 Increment
0:15:58 Decrement
0:16:22 Decimal Numbers
0:16:48 Multiply Two Decimals
0:17:18 Divide Decimals
0:17:33 Finding a Remainder
0:18:22 Augmented Addition
0:19:22 Augmented Subtraction
0:20:18 Augmented Multiplication
0:20:51 Augmented Division
0:21:19 Declare String Variables
0:22:01 Escaping Literal Quotes
0:23:44 Quoting Strings with Single Quotes
0:25:18 Escape Sequences
0:26:46 Plus Operator
0:27:49 Plus Equals Operator
0:29:01 Constructing Strings with Variables
0:30:14 Appending Variables to Strings
0:31:11 Length of a String
0:32:01 Bracket Notation
0:33:27 Understand String Immutability
0:34:23 Find the Nth Character
0:34:51 Find the Last Character
0:35:48 Find the Nth-to-Last Character
0:36:28 Word Blanks
0:40:44 Arrays
0:41:43 Nest Arrays
0:42:33 Access Array Data
0:43:34 Modify Array Data
0:44:48 Access Multi-Dimensional Arrays
0:46:30 push()
0:47:29 pop()
0:48:33 shift()
0:49:23 unshift()
0:50:36 Shopping List
0:51:41 Write Reusable with Functions
0:53:41 Arguments
0:55:43 Global Scope
0:59:31 Local Scope
1:00:46 Global vs Local Scope in Functions
1:02:40 Return a Value from a Function
1:03:55 Undefined Value returned
1:04:52 Assignment with a Returned Value
1:05:52 Stand in Line
1:08:41 Boolean Values
1:09:24 If Statements
1:11:51 Equality Operator
1:13:18 Strict Equality Operator
1:14:43 Comparing different values
1:15:38 Inequality Operator
1:16:20 Strict Inequality Operator
1:17:05 Greater Than Operator
1:17:39 Greater Than Or Equal To Operator
1:18:09 Less Than Operator
1:18:44 Less Than Or Equal To Operator
1:19:17 And Operator
1:20:41 Or Operator
1:21:37 Else Statements
1:22:27 Else If Statements
1:23:30 Logical Order in If Else Statements
1:24:45 Chaining If Else Statements
1:27:45 Golf Code
1:32:15 Switch Statements
1:35:46 Default Option in Switch Statements
1:37:23 Identical Options in Switch Statements
1:39:20 Replacing If Else Chains with Switch
1:41:11 Returning Boolean Values from Functions
1:42:20 Return Early Pattern for Functions
1:43:38 Counting Cards
1:49:11 Build Objects
1:50:46 Dot Notation
1:51:33 Bracket Notation
1:52:47 Variables
1:53:34 Updating Object Properties
1:54:30 Add New Properties to Object
1:55:19 Delete Properties from Object
1:55:54 Objects for Lookups
1:57:43 Testing Objects for Properties
1:59:15 Manipulating Complex Objects
2:01:00 Nested Objects
2:01:53 Nested Arrays
2:03:06 Record Collection
2:10:15 While Loops
2:11:35 For Loops
2:13:56 Odd Numbers With a For Loop
2:15:28 Count Backwards With a For Loop
2:17:08 Iterate Through an Array with a For Loop
2:19:43 Nesting For Loops
2:22:45 Do…While Loops
2:24:12 Profile Lookup
2:28:18 Random Fractions
2:28:54 Random Whole Numbers
2:30:21 Random Whole Numbers within a Range
2:31:46 parseInt Function
2:32:36 parseInt Function with a Radix
2:33:29 Ternary Operator
2:34:57 Multiple Ternary Operators
2:36:57 var vs let
2:39:02 var vs let scopes
2:41:32 const Keyword
2:43:40 Mutate an Array Declared with const
2:44:52 Prevent Object Mutation
2:47:17 Arrow Functions
2:28:24 Arrow Functions with Parameters
2:49:27 Higher Order Arrow Functions
2:53:04 Default Parameters
2:54:00 Rest Operator
2:55:31 Spread Operator
2:57:18 Destructuring Assignment: Objects
3:00:18 Destructuring Assignment: Nested Objects
3:01:55 Destructuring Assignment: Arrays
3:03:40 Destructuring Assignment with Rest Operator to Reassign Array
3:05:05 Destructuring Assignment to Pass an Object
3:06:39 Template Literals
3:10:43 Simple Fields
3:12:24 Declarative Functions
3:12:56 class Syntax
3:15:11 getters and setters
3:20:25 import vs require
3:22:33 export
3:23:40 * to Import
3:24:50 export default
3:25:26 Import a Default Export
📺 The video in this post was made by freeCodeCamp.org
The origin of the article: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PkZNo7MFNFg&list=PLWKjhJtqVAblfum5WiQblKPwIbqYXkDoC&index=4

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