GoFlyDigital: We Make the Business Go BOOM.

Go Fly Digital is just one of the very best Shopify development companies in India that provides the very best eCommerce services in the nation. Making up a durable group of skilled and highly-skilled experts consisting of internet developers, developers, and illustrators that produce effective eCommerce sites.
The business thinks in providing first-rate solutions to satisfy the demands of its relied on customers. They provide a wide variety of SEO solutions, web content prices, analytics prices, social prices, develop prices, illustration solutions, computer animation solutions, and so on.

Customers - ReviewsCart, E-Shoppers, Tax obligation Kaarya, Manthan Dezin Workshop, AlertTrace

E-mail - info@goflydigital.com

Site - https://goflydigital.com/

**Deal with - **861, 8th Flooring, Loom B1, Spaze I-Tech Park, Industry 49, Gurugram, Haryana 122018

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GoFlyDigital: We Make the Business Go BOOM.
Carmen  Grimes

Carmen Grimes

1595491178

Best Electric Bikes and Scooters for Rental Business or Campus Facility

The electric scooter revolution has caught on super-fast taking many cities across the globe by storm. eScooters, a renovated version of old-school scooters now turned into electric vehicles are an environmentally friendly solution to current on-demand commute problems. They work on engines, like cars, enabling short traveling distances without hassle. The result is that these groundbreaking electric machines can now provide faster transport for less — cheaper than Uber and faster than Metro.

Since they are durable, fast, easy to operate and maintain, and are more convenient to park compared to four-wheelers, the eScooters trend has and continues to spike interest as a promising growth area. Several companies and universities are increasingly setting up shop to provide eScooter services realizing a would-be profitable business model and a ready customer base that is university students or residents in need of faster and cheap travel going about their business in school, town, and other surrounding areas.

Electric Scooters Trends and Statistics

In many countries including the U.S., Canada, Mexico, U.K., Germany, France, China, Japan, India, Brazil and Mexico and more, a growing number of eScooter users both locals and tourists can now be seen effortlessly passing lines of drivers stuck in the endless and unmoving traffic.

A recent report by McKinsey revealed that the E-Scooter industry will be worth― $200 billion to $300 billion in the United States, $100 billion to $150 billion in Europe, and $30 billion to $50 billion in China in 2030. The e-Scooter revenue model will also spike and is projected to rise by more than 20% amounting to approximately $5 billion.

And, with a necessity to move people away from high carbon prints, traffic and congestion issues brought about by car-centric transport systems in cities, more and more city planners are developing more bike/scooter lanes and adopting zero-emission plans. This is the force behind the booming electric scooter market and the numbers will only go higher and higher.

Companies that have taken advantage of the growing eScooter trend develop an appthat allows them to provide efficient eScooter services. Such an app enables them to be able to locate bike pick-up and drop points through fully integrated google maps.

List of Best Electric Bikes for Rental Business or Campus Facility 2020:

It’s clear that e scooters will increasingly become more common and the e-scooter business model will continue to grab the attention of manufacturers, investors, entrepreneurs. All this should go ahead with a quest to know what are some of the best electric bikes in the market especially for anyone who would want to get started in the electric bikes/scooters rental business.

We have done a comprehensive list of the best electric bikes! Each bike has been reviewed in depth and includes a full list of specs and a photo.

Billy eBike

mobile-best-electric-bikes-scooters https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/enkicycles/billy-were-redefining-joyrides

To start us off is the Billy eBike, a powerful go-anywhere urban electric bike that’s specially designed to offer an exciting ride like no other whether you want to ride to the grocery store, cafe, work or school. The Billy eBike comes in 4 color options – Billy Blue, Polished aluminium, Artic white, and Stealth black.

Price: $2490

Available countries

Available in the USA, Europe, Asia, South Africa and Australia.This item ships from the USA. Buyers are therefore responsible for any taxes and/or customs duties incurred once it arrives in your country.

Features

  • Control – Ride with confidence with our ultra-wide BMX bars and a hyper-responsive twist throttle.
  • Stealth- Ride like a ninja with our Gates carbon drive that’s as smooth as butter and maintenance-free.
  • Drive – Ride further with our high torque fat bike motor, giving a better climbing performance.
  • Accelerate – Ride quicker with our 20-inch lightweight cutout rims for improved acceleration.
  • Customize – Ride your own way with 5 levels of power control. Each level determines power and speed.
  • Flickable – Ride harder with our BMX /MotoX inspired geometry and lightweight aluminum package

Specifications

  • Maximum speed: 20 mph (32 km/h)
  • Range per charge: 41 miles (66 km)
  • Maximum Power: 500W
  • Motor type: Fat Bike Motor: Bafang RM G060.500.DC
  • Load capacity: 300lbs (136kg)
  • Battery type: 13.6Ah Samsung lithium-ion,
  • Battery capacity: On/off-bike charging available
  • Weight: w/o batt. 48.5lbs (22kg), w/ batt. 54lbs (24.5kg)
  • Front Suspension: Fully adjustable air shock, preload/compression damping /lockout
  • Rear Suspension: spring, preload adjustment
  • Built-in GPS

Why Should You Buy This?

  • Riding fun and excitement
  • Better climbing ability and faster acceleration.
  • Ride with confidence
  • Billy folds for convenient storage and transportation.
  • Shorty levers connect to disc brakes ensuring you stop on a dime
  • belt drives are maintenance-free and clean (no oil or lubrication needed)

**Who Should Ride Billy? **

Both new and experienced riders

**Where to Buy? **Local distributors or ships from the USA.

Genze 200 series e-Bike

genze-best-electric-bikes-scooters https://www.genze.com/fleet/

Featuring a sleek and lightweight aluminum frame design, the 200-Series ebike takes your riding experience to greater heights. Available in both black and white this ebike comes with a connected app, which allows you to plan activities, map distances and routes while also allowing connections with fellow riders.

Price: $2099.00

Available countries

The Genze 200 series e-Bike is available at GenZe retail locations across the U.S or online via GenZe.com website. Customers from outside the US can ship the product while incurring the relevant charges.

Features

  • 2 Frame Options
  • 2 Sizes
  • Integrated/Removable Battery
  • Throttle and Pedal Assist Ride Modes
  • Integrated LCD Display
  • Connected App
  • 24 month warranty
  • GPS navigation
  • Bluetooth connectivity

Specifications

  • Maximum speed: 20 mph with throttle
  • Range per charge: 15-18 miles w/ throttle and 30-50 miles w/ pedal assist
  • Charging time: 3.5 hours
  • Motor type: Brushless Rear Hub Motor
  • Gears: Microshift Thumb Shifter
  • Battery type: Removable Samsung 36V, 9.6AH Li-Ion battery pack
  • Battery capacity: 36V and 350 Wh
  • Weight: 46 pounds
  • Derailleur: 8-speed Shimano
  • Brakes: Dual classic
  • Wheels: 26 x 20 inches
  • Frame: 16, and 18 inches
  • Operating Mode: Analog mode 5 levels of Pedal Assist Thrott­le Mode

Norco from eBikestore

norco-best-electric-bikes-scooters https://ebikestore.com/shop/norco-vlt-s2/

The Norco VLT S2 is a front suspension e-Bike with solid components alongside the reliable Bosch Performance Line Power systems that offer precise pedal assistance during any riding situation.

Price: $2,699.00

Available countries

This item is available via the various Norco bikes international distributors.

Features

  • VLT aluminum frame- for stiffness and wheel security.
  • Bosch e-bike system – for their reliability and performance.
  • E-bike components – for added durability.
  • Hydraulic disc brakes – offer riders more stopping power for safety and control at higher speeds.
  • Practical design features – to add convenience and versatility.

Specifications

  • Maximum speed: KMC X9 9spd
  • Motor type: Bosch Active Line
  • Gears: Shimano Altus RD-M2000, SGS, 9 Speed
  • Battery type: Power Pack 400
  • Battery capacity: 396Wh
  • Suspension: SR Suntour suspension fork
  • Frame: Norco VLT, Aluminum, 12x142mm TA Dropouts

Bodo EV

bodo-best-electric-bikes-scootershttp://www.bodoevs.com/bodoev/products_show.asp?product_id=13

Manufactured by Bodo Vehicle Group Limited, the Bodo EV is specially designed for strong power and extraordinary long service to facilitate super amazing rides. The Bodo Vehicle Company is a striking top in electric vehicles brand field in China and across the globe. Their Bodo EV will no doubt provide your riders with high-level riding satisfaction owing to its high-quality design, strength, breaking stability and speed.

Price: $799

Available countries

This item ships from China with buyers bearing the shipping costs and other variables prior to delivery.

Features

  • Reliable
  • Environment friendly
  • Comfortable riding
  • Fashionable
  • Economical
  • Durable – long service life
  • Braking stability
  • LED lighting technology

Specifications

  • Maximum speed: 45km/h
  • Range per charge: 50km per person
  • Charging time: 8 hours
  • Maximum Power: 3000W
  • Motor type: Brushless DC Motor
  • Load capacity: 100kg
  • Battery type: Lead-acid battery
  • Battery capacity: 60V 20AH
  • Weight: w/o battery 47kg

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Fannie  Zemlak

Fannie Zemlak

1599854400

What's new in the go 1.15

Go announced Go 1.15 version on 11 Aug 2020. Highlighted updates and features include Substantial improvements to the Go linker, Improved allocation for small objects at high core counts, X.509 CommonName deprecation, GOPROXY supports skipping proxies that return errors, New embedded tzdata package, Several Core Library improvements and more.

As Go promise for maintaining backward compatibility. After upgrading to the latest Go 1.15 version, almost all existing Golang applications or programs continue to compile and run as older Golang version.

#go #golang #go 1.15 #go features #go improvement #go package #go new features

Carmen  Grimes

Carmen Grimes

1595494844

How to start an electric scooter facility/fleet in a university campus/IT park

Are you leading an organization that has a large campus, e.g., a large university? You are probably thinking of introducing an electric scooter/bicycle fleet on the campus, and why wouldn’t you?

Introducing micro-mobility in your campus with the help of such a fleet would help the people on the campus significantly. People would save money since they don’t need to use a car for a short distance. Your campus will see a drastic reduction in congestion, moreover, its carbon footprint will reduce.

Micro-mobility is relatively new though and you would need help. You would need to select an appropriate fleet of vehicles. The people on your campus would need to find electric scooters or electric bikes for commuting, and you need to provide a solution for this.

To be more specific, you need a short-term electric bike rental app. With such an app, you will be able to easily offer micro-mobility to the people on the campus. We at Devathon have built Autorent exactly for this.

What does Autorent do and how can it help you? How does it enable you to introduce micro-mobility on your campus? We explain these in this article, however, we will touch upon a few basics first.

Micro-mobility: What it is

micro-mobility

You are probably thinking about micro-mobility relatively recently, aren’t you? A few relevant insights about it could help you to better appreciate its importance.

Micro-mobility is a new trend in transportation, and it uses vehicles that are considerably smaller than cars. Electric scooters (e-scooters) and electric bikes (e-bikes) are the most popular forms of micro-mobility, however, there are also e-unicycles and e-skateboards.

You might have already seen e-scooters, which are kick scooters that come with a motor. Thanks to its motor, an e-scooter can achieve a speed of up to 20 km/h. On the other hand, e-bikes are popular in China and Japan, and they come with a motor, and you can reach a speed of 40 km/h.

You obviously can’t use these vehicles for very long commutes, however, what if you need to travel a short distance? Even if you have a reasonable public transport facility in the city, it might not cover the route you need to take. Take the example of a large university campus. Such a campus is often at a considerable distance from the central business district of the city where it’s located. While public transport facilities may serve the central business district, they wouldn’t serve this large campus. Currently, many people drive their cars even for short distances.

As you know, that brings its own set of challenges. Vehicular traffic adds significantly to pollution, moreover, finding a parking spot can be hard in crowded urban districts.

Well, you can reduce your carbon footprint if you use an electric car. However, electric cars are still new, and many countries are still building the necessary infrastructure for them. Your large campus might not have the necessary infrastructure for them either. Presently, electric cars don’t represent a viable option in most geographies.

As a result, you need to buy and maintain a car even if your commute is short. In addition to dealing with parking problems, you need to spend significantly on your car.

All of these factors have combined to make people sit up and think seriously about cars. Many people are now seriously considering whether a car is really the best option even if they have to commute only a short distance.

This is where micro-mobility enters the picture. When you commute a short distance regularly, e-scooters or e-bikes are viable options. You limit your carbon footprints and you cut costs!

Businesses have seen this shift in thinking, and e-scooter companies like Lime and Bird have entered this field in a big way. They let you rent e-scooters by the minute. On the other hand, start-ups like Jump and Lyft have entered the e-bike market.

Think of your campus now! The people there might need to travel short distances within the campus, and e-scooters can really help them.

How micro-mobility can benefit you

benefits-micromobility

What advantages can you get from micro-mobility? Let’s take a deeper look into this question.

Micro-mobility can offer several advantages to the people on your campus, e.g.:

  • Affordability: Shared e-scooters are cheaper than other mass transportation options. Remember that the people on your campus will use them on a shared basis, and they will pay for their short commutes only. Well, depending on your operating model, you might even let them use shared e-scooters or e-bikes for free!
  • Convenience: Users don’t need to worry about finding parking spots for shared e-scooters since these are small. They can easily travel from point A to point B on your campus with the help of these e-scooters.
  • Environmentally sustainable: Shared e-scooters reduce the carbon footprint, moreover, they decongest the roads. Statistics from the pilot programs in cities like Portland and Denver showimpressive gains around this key aspect.
  • Safety: This one’s obvious, isn’t it? When people on your campus use small e-scooters or e-bikes instead of cars, the problem of overspeeding will disappear. you will see fewer accidents.

#android app #autorent #ios app #mobile app development #app like bird #app like bounce #app like lime #autorent #bird scooter business model #bird scooter rental #bird scooter rental cost #bird scooter rental price #clone app like bird #clone app like bounce #clone app like lime #electric rental scooters #electric scooter company #electric scooter rental business #how do you start a moped #how to start a moped #how to start a scooter rental business #how to start an electric company #how to start electric scooterrental business #lime scooter business model #scooter franchise #scooter rental business #scooter rental business for sale #scooter rental business insurance #scooters franchise cost #white label app like bird #white label app like bounce #white label app like lime

Why Business Cards Printing are essential for your business

No matter how technological advancement helps in communication but business card printing still worth it. Most businesses prefer to have and share business cards to develop a direct relationship with the potential market. It is an important part of the promotional and branding strategy and effectively described the brand’s nature. It gives ease in sharing the business-related information in the public like at conference, workshops and other.

This is image title

Moreover, a quality visiting card printing online provides the impression of products or services. According to the random research, it is stated that most of the customers draw the conclusion about the business and its products from the card quality or its printing. So, a smart business card with the right size and content is essential for the business.

Here are the factors that will help to understand the importance of the business card in the brand promotion or more:

Provide Contact Details:

One of the main reasons behind business card printing is the contact sharing features. The card contains contact details, name, logo, and other related information that helps the client to reach the business. Further, it helps to describe the brand or product nature before approaching the product or services. Other than the technology usage or sharing of the information through devices, business cards are most suitable and a handy item that worth a lot for the customers.

This is image title

The impression of the Brand:

The business card is a source that will deliver the first impression of the brand or business towards the potential buyers. It is something handy with the physical touch that develops a direct relationship with the potential market. While going to print business cards that quality, printing style, and overall outlook matters a lot. Because it works as the first impression of the business and its product or services for the potential market. So, the worthy card made with durable material and have an attractive color combination or layout can capture the interest easily.

It contains the company logo, name, design, and color combination that quickly attain the interest of the audience. On other hand, it is an important factor to pay attention to while making the designing and printing decision about the business card.

Direct Marketing Facility:

No doubt there are multiple marketing and promotional tools are available for the product or business promotion. But engraved business cards online is something incredible and handy that provide the physical touch experience. It works as the marketing or promotional element that helps in sharing the details directly to the potential market. With the more physical interaction that the business cards offer to the buyers and business.

The important thing that has to be considered in making the custom business cards, related to the content adjustment, design, and color combination. It helps to capture the buyer’s interest and deliver the right impression towards them.

This is image title

Appreciated in Different Cultures:

The business cards preferably deliver the right knowledge and impression about the product or services. It described the brand position, nature of the products or services, and other relevant skills. In most cultures, it is appreciated to have and share physical business cards as an information-sharing tool. In face-to-face interaction, develops a network and promotes sharing the business information in a circle.

Ease to Provide a Business Reference:

In business cards, online people find multiple opportunities in designing and Printing Services with a significant impression. It helps to make an easy referral related to particular services and a person with a skill set. The business car not only contains the address, contact information, or brand-related knowledge. It provides details about the particular person and reflects the skill set. Multiple factors truly help to describe the right impression of the brand through color, text, and images.

A tool to Develop Trust:

For business growth and development, it is important to gain the trust level of the customers. With the custom business cards, it is easier to attain the trust of the customers. in the competitive business atmosphere for a business survival trust is the only key, that can be over the product or on a company as well. Through the business card, it is easier to exchange and share personal warmth feelings.

With Business Cards Printing, it is easier to show more graphical representation through colors and design. Moreover, with the physical touch, it is easier to give trust feelings or more.

This is image title

Final Consideration!

In the competitive business world, the business card is a source to deliver information and capture the interest of potential buyers. It helps to impress the audience and provide relevant product details and skills that build trust or act as the direct promotional tool.

#business cards printing #visiting card printing online #go print business cards #engraved business cards online #custom business cards #business cards online

Elian  Harber

Elian Harber

1641430440

Bokeh Plotting Backend for Pandas and GeoPandas

Pandas-Bokeh provides a Bokeh plotting backend for Pandas, GeoPandas and Pyspark DataFrames, similar to the already existing Visualization feature of Pandas. Importing the library adds a complementary plotting method plot_bokeh() on DataFrames and Series.

With Pandas-Bokeh, creating stunning, interactive, HTML-based visualization is as easy as calling:

df.plot_bokeh()

Pandas-Bokeh also provides native support as a Pandas Plotting backend for Pandas >= 0.25. When Pandas-Bokeh is installed, switchting the default Pandas plotting backend to Bokeh can be done via:

pd.set_option('plotting.backend', 'pandas_bokeh')

More details about the new Pandas backend can be found below.


Interactive Documentation

Please visit:

https://patrikhlobil.github.io/Pandas-Bokeh/

for an interactive version of the documentation below, where you can play with the dynamic Bokeh plots.


For more information have a look at the Examples below or at notebooks on the Github Repository of this project.

Startimage


 

Installation

You can install Pandas-Bokeh from PyPI via pip

pip install pandas-bokeh

or conda:

conda install -c patrikhlobil pandas-bokeh

With the current release 0.5.5, Pandas-Bokeh officially supports Python 3.6 and newer. For more details, see Release Notes.

How To Use

Classical Use

The Pandas-Bokeh library should be imported after Pandas, GeoPandas and/or Pyspark. After the import, one should define the plotting output, which can be:

pandas_bokeh.output_notebook(): Embeds the Plots in the cell outputs of the notebook. Ideal when working in Jupyter Notebooks.

pandas_bokeh.output_file(filename): Exports the plot to the provided filename as an HTML.

For more details about the plotting outputs, see the reference here or the Bokeh documentation.

Notebook output (see also bokeh.io.output_notebook)

import pandas as pd import pandas_bokeh pandas_bokeh.output_notebook()

File output to "Interactive Plot.html" (see also bokeh.io.output_file)

import pandas as pd import pandas_bokeh pandas_bokeh.output_file("Interactive Plot.html")

Pandas-Bokeh as native Pandas plotting backend

For pandas >= 0.25, a plotting backend switch is natively supported. It can be achievied by calling:

import pandas as pd
pd.set_option('plotting.backend', 'pandas_bokeh')

Now, the plotting API is accessible for a Pandas DataFrame via:

df.plot(...)

All additional functionalities of Pandas-Bokeh are then accessible at pd.plotting. So, setting the output to notebook is:

pd.plotting.output_notebook()

or calling the grid layout functionality:

pd.plotting.plot_grid(...)

Note: Backwards compatibility is kept since there will still be the df.plot_bokeh(...) methods for a DataFrame.


Plot types

Supported plottypes are at the moment:

Also, check out the complementary chapter Outputs, Formatting & Layouts about:


Lineplot

Basic Lineplot

This simple lineplot in Pandas-Bokeh already contains various interactive elements:

  • a pannable and zoomable (zoom in plotarea and zoom on axis) plot
  • by clicking on the legend elements, one can hide and show the individual lines
  • a Hovertool for the plotted lines

Consider the following simple example:

import numpy as np

np.random.seed(42)
df = pd.DataFrame({"Google": np.random.randn(1000)+0.2, 
                   "Apple": np.random.randn(1000)+0.17}, 
                   index=pd.date_range('1/1/2000', periods=1000))
df = df.cumsum()
df = df + 50
df.plot_bokeh(kind="line")       #equivalent to df.plot_bokeh.line()

ApplevsGoogle_1

Note, that similar to the regular pandas.DataFrame.plot method, there are also additional accessors to directly access the different plotting types like:

  • df.plot_bokeh(kind="line", ...)df.plot_bokeh.line(...)
  • df.plot_bokeh(kind="bar", ...)df.plot_bokeh.bar(...)
  • df.plot_bokeh(kind="hist", ...)df.plot_bokeh.hist(...)
  • ...

Advanced Lineplot

There are various optional parameters to tune the plots, for example:

kind: Which kind of plot should be produced. Currently supported are: "line", "point", "scatter", "bar" and "histogram". In the near future many more will be implemented as horizontal barplot, boxplots, pie-charts, etc.

x: Name of the column to use for the horizontal x-axis. If the x parameter is not specified, the index is used for the x-values of the plot. Alternative, also an array of values can be passed that has the same number of elements as the DataFrame.

y: Name of column or list of names of columns to use for the vertical y-axis.

figsize: Choose width & height of the plot

title: Sets title of the plot

xlim/ylim: Set visibler range of plot for x- and y-axis (also works for datetime x-axis)

xlabel/ylabel: Set x- and y-labels

logx/logy: Set log-scale on x-/y-axis

xticks/yticks: Explicitly set the ticks on the axes

color: Defines a single color for a plot.

colormap: Can be used to specify multiple colors to plot. Can be either a list of colors or the name of a Bokeh color palette

hovertool: If True a Hovertool is active, else if False no Hovertool is drawn.

hovertool_string: If specified, this string will be used for the hovertool (@{column} will be replaced by the value of the column for the element the mouse hovers over, see also Bokeh documentation and here)

toolbar_location: Specify the position of the toolbar location (None, "above", "below", "left" or "right"). Default: "right"

zooming: Enables/Disables zooming. Default: True

panning: Enables/Disables panning. Default: True

fontsize_label/fontsize_ticks/fontsize_title/fontsize_legend: Set fontsize of labels, ticks, title or legend (int or string of form "15pt")

rangetool Enables a range tool scroller. Default False

kwargs**: Optional keyword arguments of bokeh.plotting.figure.line

Try them out to get a feeling for the effects. Let us consider now:

df.plot_bokeh.line(
    figsize=(800, 450),
    y="Apple",
    title="Apple vs Google",
    xlabel="Date",
    ylabel="Stock price [$]",
    yticks=[0, 100, 200, 300, 400],
    ylim=(0, 400),
    toolbar_location=None,
    colormap=["red", "blue"],
    hovertool_string=r"""<img
                        src='https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fa/Apple_logo_black.svg/170px-Apple_logo_black.svg.png' 
                        height="42" alt="@imgs" width="42"
                        style="float: left; margin: 0px 15px 15px 0px;"
                        border="2"></img> Apple 
                        
                        <h4> Stock Price: </h4> @{Apple}""",
    panning=False,
    zooming=False)

ApplevsGoogle_2

Lineplot with data points

For lineplots, as for many other plot-kinds, there are some special keyword arguments that only work for this plotting type. For lineplots, these are:

plot_data_points: Plot also the data points on the lines

plot_data_points_size: Determines the size of the data points

marker: Defines the point type (Default: "circle"). Possible values are: 'circle', 'square', 'triangle', 'asterisk', 'circle_x', 'square_x', 'inverted_triangle', 'x', 'circle_cross', 'square_cross', 'diamond', 'cross'

kwargs**: Optional keyword arguments of bokeh.plotting.figure.line```

Let us use this information to have another version of the same plot:

df.plot_bokeh.line(
    figsize=(800, 450),
    title="Apple vs Google",
    xlabel="Date",
    ylabel="Stock price [$]",
    yticks=[0, 100, 200, 300, 400],
    ylim=(100, 200),
    xlim=("2001-01-01", "2001-02-01"),
    colormap=["red", "blue"],
    plot_data_points=True,
    plot_data_points_size=10,
    marker="asterisk")

ApplevsGoogle_3

Lineplot with rangetool

ts = pd.Series(np.random.randn(1000), index=pd.date_range('1/1/2000', periods=1000))
df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randn(1000, 4), index=ts.index, columns=list('ABCD'))
df = df.cumsum()

df.plot_bokeh(rangetool=True)

rangetool

Pointplot

If you just wish to draw the date points for curves, the pointplot option is the right choice. It also accepts the kwargs of bokeh.plotting.figure.scatter like marker or size:

import numpy as np

x = np.arange(-3, 3, 0.1)
y2 = x**2
y3 = x**3
df = pd.DataFrame({"x": x, "Parabula": y2, "Cube": y3})
df.plot_bokeh.point(
    x="x",
    xticks=range(-3, 4),
    size=5,
    colormap=["#009933", "#ff3399"],
    title="Pointplot (Parabula vs. Cube)",
    marker="x")

Pointplot

Stepplot

With a similar API as the line- & pointplots, one can generate a stepplot. Additional keyword arguments for this plot type are passes to bokeh.plotting.figure.step, e.g. mode (before, after, center), see the following example

import numpy as np

x = np.arange(-3, 3, 1)
y2 = x**2
y3 = x**3
df = pd.DataFrame({"x": x, "Parabula": y2, "Cube": y3})
df.plot_bokeh.step(
    x="x",
    xticks=range(-1, 1),
    colormap=["#009933", "#ff3399"],
    title="Pointplot (Parabula vs. Cube)",
    figsize=(800,300),
    fontsize_title=30,
    fontsize_label=25,
    fontsize_ticks=15,
    fontsize_legend=5,
    )

df.plot_bokeh.step(
    x="x",
    xticks=range(-1, 1),
    colormap=["#009933", "#ff3399"],
    title="Pointplot (Parabula vs. Cube)",
    mode="after",
    figsize=(800,300)
    )

Stepplot

Note that the step-plot API of Bokeh does so far not support a hovertool functionality.

Scatterplot

A basic scatterplot can be created using the kind="scatter" option. For scatterplots, the x and y parameters have to be specified and the following optional keyword argument is allowed:

category: Determines the category column to use for coloring the scatter points

kwargs**: Optional keyword arguments of bokeh.plotting.figure.scatter

Note, that the pandas.DataFrame.plot_bokeh() method return per default a Bokeh figure, which can be embedded in Dashboard layouts with other figures and Bokeh objects (for more details about (sub)plot layouts and embedding the resulting Bokeh plots as HTML click here).

In the example below, we use the building grid layout support of Pandas-Bokeh to display both the DataFrame (using a Bokeh DataTable) and the resulting scatterplot:

# Load Iris Dataset:
df = pd.read_csv(
    r"https://raw.githubusercontent.com/PatrikHlobil/Pandas-Bokeh/master/docs/Testdata/iris/iris.csv"
)
df = df.sample(frac=1)

# Create Bokeh-Table with DataFrame:
from bokeh.models.widgets import DataTable, TableColumn
from bokeh.models import ColumnDataSource

data_table = DataTable(
    columns=[TableColumn(field=Ci, title=Ci) for Ci in df.columns],
    source=ColumnDataSource(df),
    height=300,
)

# Create Scatterplot:
p_scatter = df.plot_bokeh.scatter(
    x="petal length (cm)",
    y="sepal width (cm)",
    category="species",
    title="Iris DataSet Visualization",
    show_figure=False,
)

# Combine Table and Scatterplot via grid layout:
pandas_bokeh.plot_grid([[data_table, p_scatter]], plot_width=400, plot_height=350)

 

Scatterplot

A possible optional keyword parameters that can be passed to bokeh.plotting.figure.scatter is size. Below, we use the sepal length of the Iris data as reference for the size:

#Change one value to clearly see the effect of the size keyword
df.loc[13, "sepal length (cm)"] = 15

#Make scatterplot:
p_scatter = df.plot_bokeh.scatter(
    x="petal length (cm)",
    y="sepal width (cm)",
    category="species",
    title="Iris DataSet Visualization with Size Keyword",
    size="sepal length (cm)")

Scatterplot2

In this example you can see, that the additional dimension sepal length cannot be used to clearly differentiate between the virginica and versicolor species.

Barplot

The barplot API has no special keyword arguments, but accepts optional kwargs of bokeh.plotting.figure.vbar like alpha. It uses per default the index for the bar categories (however, also columns can be used as x-axis category using the x argument).

data = {
    'fruits':
    ['Apples', 'Pears', 'Nectarines', 'Plums', 'Grapes', 'Strawberries'],
    '2015': [2, 1, 4, 3, 2, 4],
    '2016': [5, 3, 3, 2, 4, 6],
    '2017': [3, 2, 4, 4, 5, 3]
}
df = pd.DataFrame(data).set_index("fruits")

p_bar = df.plot_bokeh.bar(
    ylabel="Price per Unit [€]", 
    title="Fruit prices per Year", 
    alpha=0.6)

Barplot

Using the stacked keyword argument you also maked stacked barplots:

p_stacked_bar = df.plot_bokeh.bar(
    ylabel="Price per Unit [€]",
    title="Fruit prices per Year",
    stacked=True,
    alpha=0.6)

Barplot2

Also horizontal versions of the above barplot are supported with the keyword kind="barh" or the accessor plot_bokeh.barh. You can still specify a column of the DataFrame as the bar category via the x argument if you do not wish to use the index.

#Reset index, such that "fruits" is now a column of the DataFrame:
df.reset_index(inplace=True)

#Create horizontal bar (via kind keyword):
p_hbar = df.plot_bokeh(
    kind="barh",
    x="fruits",
    xlabel="Price per Unit [€]",
    title="Fruit prices per Year",
    alpha=0.6,
    legend = "bottom_right",
    show_figure=False)

#Create stacked horizontal bar (via barh accessor):
p_stacked_hbar = df.plot_bokeh.barh(
    x="fruits",
    stacked=True,
    xlabel="Price per Unit [€]",
    title="Fruit prices per Year",
    alpha=0.6,
    legend = "bottom_right",
    show_figure=False)

#Plot all barplot examples in a grid:
pandas_bokeh.plot_grid([[p_bar, p_stacked_bar],
                        [p_hbar, p_stacked_hbar]], 
                       plot_width=450)

Barplot3

Histogram

For drawing histograms (kind="hist"), Pandas-Bokeh has a lot of customization features. Optional keyword arguments for histogram plots are:

bins: Determines bins to use for the histogram. If bins is an int, it defines the number of equal-width bins in the given range (10, by default). If bins is a sequence, it defines the bin edges, including the rightmost edge, allowing for non-uniform bin widths. If bins is a string, it defines the method used to calculate the optimal bin width, as defined by histogram_bin_edges.

histogram_type: Either "sidebyside", "topontop" or "stacked". Default: "topontop"

stacked: Boolean that overrides the histogram_type as "stacked" if given. Default: False

kwargs**: Optional keyword arguments of bokeh.plotting.figure.quad

Below examples of the different histogram types:

import numpy as np

df_hist = pd.DataFrame({
    'a': np.random.randn(1000) + 1,
    'b': np.random.randn(1000),
    'c': np.random.randn(1000) - 1
    },
    columns=['a', 'b', 'c'])

#Top-on-Top Histogram (Default):
df_hist.plot_bokeh.hist(
    bins=np.linspace(-5, 5, 41),
    vertical_xlabel=True,
    hovertool=False,
    title="Normal distributions (Top-on-Top)",
    line_color="black")

#Side-by-Side Histogram (multiple bars share bin side-by-side) also accessible via
#kind="hist":
df_hist.plot_bokeh(
    kind="hist",
    bins=np.linspace(-5, 5, 41),
    histogram_type="sidebyside",
    vertical_xlabel=True,
    hovertool=False,
    title="Normal distributions (Side-by-Side)",
    line_color="black")

#Stacked histogram:
df_hist.plot_bokeh.hist(
    bins=np.linspace(-5, 5, 41),
    histogram_type="stacked",
    vertical_xlabel=True,
    hovertool=False,
    title="Normal distributions (Stacked)",
    line_color="black")

Histogram

Further, advanced keyword arguments for histograms are:

  • weights: A column of the DataFrame that is used as weight for the histogramm aggregation (see also numpy.histogram)
  • normed: If True, histogram values are normed to 1 (sum of histogram values=1). It is also possible to pass an integer, e.g. normed=100 would result in a histogram with percentage y-axis (sum of histogram values=100). Default: False
  • cumulative: If True, a cumulative histogram is shown. Default: False
  • show_average: If True, the average of the histogram is also shown. Default: False

Their usage is shown in these examples:

p_hist = df_hist.plot_bokeh.hist(
    y=["a", "b"],
    bins=np.arange(-4, 6.5, 0.5),
    normed=100,
    vertical_xlabel=True,
    ylabel="Share[%]",
    title="Normal distributions (normed)",
    show_average=True,
    xlim=(-4, 6),
    ylim=(0, 30),
    show_figure=False)

p_hist_cum = df_hist.plot_bokeh.hist(
    y=["a", "b"],
    bins=np.arange(-4, 6.5, 0.5),
    normed=100,
    cumulative=True,
    vertical_xlabel=True,
    ylabel="Share[%]",
    title="Normal distributions (normed & cumulative)",
    show_figure=False)

pandas_bokeh.plot_grid([[p_hist, p_hist_cum]], plot_width=450, plot_height=300)

Histogram2


 

Areaplot

Areaplot (kind="area") can be either drawn on top of each other or stacked. The important parameters are:

stacked: If True, the areaplots are stacked. If False, plots are drawn on top of each other. Default: False

kwargs**: Optional keyword arguments of bokeh.plotting.figure.patch


Let us consider the energy consumption split by source that can be downloaded as DataFrame via:

df_energy = pd.read_csv(r"https://raw.githubusercontent.com/PatrikHlobil/Pandas-Bokeh/master/docs/Testdata/energy/energy.csv", 
parse_dates=["Year"])
df_energy.head()
YearOilGasCoalNuclear EnergyHydroelectricityOther Renewable
1970-01-012291.5826.71467.317.7265.85.8
1971-01-012427.7884.81459.224.9276.46.3
1972-01-012613.9933.71475.734.1288.96.8
1973-01-012818.1978.01519.645.9292.57.3
1974-01-012777.31001.91520.959.6321.17.7


Creating the Areaplot can be achieved via:

df_energy.plot_bokeh.area(
    x="Year",
    stacked=True,
    legend="top_left",
    colormap=["brown", "orange", "black", "grey", "blue", "green"],
    title="Worldwide energy consumption split by energy source",
    ylabel="Million tonnes oil equivalent",
    ylim=(0, 16000))

areaplot

Note that the energy consumption of fossile energy is still increasing and renewable energy sources are still small in comparison 😢!!! However, when we norm the plot using the normed keyword, there is a clear trend towards renewable energies in the last decade:

df_energy.plot_bokeh.area(
    x="Year",
    stacked=True,
    normed=100,
    legend="bottom_left",
    colormap=["brown", "orange", "black", "grey", "blue", "green"],
    title="Worldwide energy consumption split by energy source",
    ylabel="Million tonnes oil equivalent")

areaplot2

Pieplot

For Pieplots, let us consider a dataset showing the results of all Bundestags elections in Germany since 2002:

df_pie = pd.read_csv(r"https://raw.githubusercontent.com/PatrikHlobil/Pandas-Bokeh/master/docs/Testdata/Bundestagswahl/Bundestagswahl.csv")
df_pie
Partei20022005200920132017
CDU/CSU38.535.233.841.532.9
SPD38.534.223.025.720.5
FDP7.49.814.64.810.7
Grünen8.68.110.78.48.9
Linke/PDS4.08.711.98.69.2
AfD0.00.00.00.012.6
Sonstige3.04.06.011.05.0

We can create a Pieplot of the last election in 2017 by specifying the "Partei" (german for party) column as the x column and the "2017" column as the y column for values:

df_pie.plot_bokeh.pie(
    x="Partei",
    y="2017",
    colormap=["blue", "red", "yellow", "green", "purple", "orange", "grey"],
    title="Results of German Bundestag Election 2017",
    )

pieplot

When you pass several columns to the y parameter (not providing the y-parameter assumes you plot all columns), multiple nested pieplots will be shown in one plot:

df_pie.plot_bokeh.pie(
    x="Partei",
    colormap=["blue", "red", "yellow", "green", "purple", "orange", "grey"],
    title="Results of German Bundestag Elections [2002-2017]",
    line_color="grey")

pieplot2

Mapplot

The mapplot method of Pandas-Bokeh allows for plotting geographic points stored in a Pandas DataFrame on an interactive map. For more advanced Geoplots for line and polygon shapes have a look at the Geoplots examples for the GeoPandas API of Pandas-Bokeh.

For mapplots, only (latitude, longitude) pairs in geographic projection (WGS84) can be plotted on a map. The basic API has the following 2 base parameters:

  • x: name of the longitude column of the DataFrame
  • y: name of the latitude column of the DataFrame

The other optional keyword arguments are discussed in the section about the GeoPandas API, e.g. category for coloring the points.

Below an example of plotting all cities for more than 1 million inhabitants:

df_mapplot = pd.read_csv(r"https://raw.githubusercontent.com/PatrikHlobil/Pandas-Bokeh/master/docs/Testdata/populated%20places/populated_places.csv")
df_mapplot.head()
namepop_maxlatitudelongitudesize
Mesa108539433.423915-111.7360841.085394
Sharjah110302725.37138355.4064781.103027
Changwon108149935.219102128.5835621.081499
Sheffield129290053.366677-1.4999971.292900
Abbottabad118364734.14950373.1995011.183647
df_mapplot["size"] = df_mapplot["pop_max"] / 1000000
df_mapplot.plot_bokeh.map(
    x="longitude",
    y="latitude",
    hovertool_string="""<h2> @{name} </h2> 
    
                        <h3> Population: @{pop_max} </h3>""",
    tile_provider="STAMEN_TERRAIN_RETINA",
    size="size", 
    figsize=(900, 600),
    title="World cities with more than 1.000.000 inhabitants")

 

Mapplot

Geoplots

Pandas-Bokeh also allows for interactive plotting of Maps using GeoPandas by providing a geopandas.GeoDataFrame.plot_bokeh() method. It allows to plot the following geodata on a map :

  • Points/MultiPoints
  • Lines/MultiLines
  • Polygons/MultiPolygons

Note: t is not possible to mix up the objects types, i.e. a GeoDataFrame with Points and Lines is for example not allowed.

Les us start with a simple example using the "World Borders Dataset" . Let us first import all neccessary libraries and read the shapefile:

import geopandas as gpd
import pandas as pd
import pandas_bokeh
pandas_bokeh.output_notebook()

#Read in GeoJSON from URL:
df_states = gpd.read_file(r"https://raw.githubusercontent.com/PatrikHlobil/Pandas-Bokeh/master/docs/Testdata/states/states.geojson")
df_states.head()
STATE_NAMEREGIONPOPESTIMATE2010POPESTIMATE2011POPESTIMATE2012POPESTIMATE2013POPESTIMATE2014POPESTIMATE2015POPESTIMATE2016POPESTIMATE2017geometry
Hawaii413638171378323139277214080381417710142632014286831427538(POLYGON ((-160.0738033454681 22.0041773479577...
Washington467413866819155689089969634107046931715281872809347405743(POLYGON ((-122.4020153103835 48.2252163723779...
Montana4990507996866100352210119211019931102831710386561050493POLYGON ((-111.4754253002074 44.70216236909688...
Maine113275681327968132810113279751328903132778713302321335907(POLYGON ((-69.77727626137293 44.0741483685119...
North Dakota2674518684830701380722908738658754859755548755393POLYGON ((-98.73043728833767 45.93827137024809...

Plotting the data on a map is as simple as calling:

df_states.plot_bokeh(simplify_shapes=10000)

US_States_1

We also passed the optional parameter simplify_shapes (~meter) to improve plotting performance (for a reference see shapely.object.simplify). The above geolayer thus has an accuracy of about 10km.

Many keyword arguments like xlabel, ylabel, xlim, ylim, title, colormap, hovertool, zooming, panning, ... for costumizing the plot are also available for the geoplotting API and can be uses as in the examples shown above. There are however also many other options especially for plotting geodata:

  • geometry_column: Specify the column that stores the geometry-information (default: "geometry")
  • hovertool_columns: Specify column names, for which values should be shown in hovertool
  • hovertool_string: If specified, this string will be used for the hovertool (@{column} will be replaced by the value of the column for the element the mouse hovers over, see also Bokeh documentation)
  • colormap_uselog: If set True, the colormapper is using a logscale. Default: False
  • colormap_range: Specify the value range of the colormapper via (min, max) tuple
  • tile_provider: Define build-in tile provider for background maps. Possible values: None, 'CARTODBPOSITRON', 'CARTODBPOSITRON_RETINA', 'STAMEN_TERRAIN', 'STAMEN_TERRAIN_RETINA', 'STAMEN_TONER', 'STAMEN_TONER_BACKGROUND', 'STAMEN_TONER_LABELS'. Default: CARTODBPOSITRON_RETINA
  • tile_provider_url: An arbitraty tile_provider_url of the form '/{Z}/{X}/{Y}*.png' can be passed to be used as background map.
  • tile_attribution: String (also HTML accepted) for showing attribution for tile source in the lower right corner
  • tile_alpha: Sets the alpha value of the background tile between [0, 1]. Default: 1

One of the most common usage of map plots are choropleth maps, where the color of a the objects is determined by the property of the object itself. There are 3 ways of drawing choropleth maps using Pandas-Bokeh, which are described below.

Categories

This is the simplest way. Just provide the category keyword for the selection of the property column:

  • category: Specifies the column of the GeoDataFrame that should be used to draw a choropleth map
  • show_colorbar: Whether or not to show a colorbar for categorical plots. Default: True

Let us now draw the regions as a choropleth plot using the category keyword (at the moment, only numerical columns are supported for choropleth plots):

df_states.plot_bokeh(
    figsize=(900, 600),
    simplify_shapes=5000,
    category="REGION",
    show_colorbar=False,
    colormap=["blue", "yellow", "green", "red"],
    hovertool_columns=["STATE_NAME", "REGION"],
    tile_provider="STAMEN_TERRAIN_RETINA")

When hovering over the states, the state-name and the region are shown as specified in the hovertool_columns argument.

US_States_2

 

Dropdown

By passing a list of column names of the GeoDataFrame as the dropdown keyword argument, a dropdown menu is shown above the map. This dropdown menu can be used to select the choropleth layer by the user. :

df_states["STATE_NAME_SMALL"] = df_states["STATE_NAME"].str.lower()

df_states.plot_bokeh(
    figsize=(900, 600),
    simplify_shapes=5000,
    dropdown=["POPESTIMATE2010", "POPESTIMATE2017"],
    colormap="Viridis",
    hovertool_string="""
                        <img
                        src="https://www.states101.com/img/flags/gif/small/@STATE_NAME_SMALL.gif" 
                        height="42" alt="@imgs" width="42"
                        style="float: left; margin: 0px 15px 15px 0px;"
                        border="2"></img>
                
                        <h2>  @STATE_NAME </h2>
                        <h3> 2010: @POPESTIMATE2010 </h3>
                        <h3> 2017: @POPESTIMATE2017 </h3>""",
    tile_provider_url=r"http://c.tile.stamen.com/watercolor/{Z}/{X}/{Y}.jpg",
    tile_attribution='Map tiles by <a href="http://stamen.com">Stamen Design</a>, under <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0">CC BY 3.0</a>. Data by <a href="http://openstreetmap.org">OpenStreetMap</a>, under <a href="http://www.openstreetmap.org/copyright">ODbL</a>.'
    )

US_States_3

Using hovertool_string, one can pass a string that can contain arbitrary HTML elements (including divs, images, ...) that is shown when hovering over the geographies (@{column} will be replaced by the value of the column for the element the mouse hovers over, see also Bokeh documentation).

Here, we also used an OSM tile server with watercolor style via tile_provider_url and added the attribution via tile_attribution.

Sliders

Another option for interactive choropleth maps is the slider implementation of Pandas-Bokeh. The possible keyword arguments are here:

  • slider: By passing a list of column names of the GeoDataFrame, a slider can be used to . This dropdown menu can be used to select the choropleth layer by the user.
  • slider_range: Pass a range (or numpy.arange) of numbers object to relate the sliders values with the slider columns. By passing range(0,10), the slider will have values [0, 1, 2, ..., 9], when passing numpy.arange(3,5,0.5), the slider will have values [3, 3.5, 4, 4.5]. Default: range(0, len(slider))
  • slider_name: Specifies the title of the slider. Default is an empty string.

This can be used to display the change in population relative to the year 2010:


#Calculate change of population relative to 2010:
for i in range(8):
    df_states["Delta_Population_201%d"%i] = ((df_states["POPESTIMATE201%d"%i] / df_states["POPESTIMATE2010"]) -1 ) * 100

#Specify slider columns:
slider_columns = ["Delta_Population_201%d"%i for i in range(8)]

#Specify slider-range (Maps "Delta_Population_2010" -> 2010, 
#                           "Delta_Population_2011" -> 2011, ...):
slider_range = range(2010, 2018)

#Make slider plot:
df_states.plot_bokeh(
    figsize=(900, 600),
    simplify_shapes=5000,
    slider=slider_columns,
    slider_range=slider_range,
    slider_name="Year", 
    colormap="Inferno",
    hovertool_columns=["STATE_NAME"] + slider_columns,
    title="Change of Population [%]")

US_States_4



 

Plot multiple geolayers

If you wish to display multiple geolayers, you can pass the Bokeh figure of a Pandas-Bokeh plot via the figure keyword to the next plot_bokeh() call:

import geopandas as gpd
import pandas_bokeh
pandas_bokeh.output_notebook()

# Read in GeoJSONs from URL:
df_states = gpd.read_file(r"https://raw.githubusercontent.com/PatrikHlobil/Pandas-Bokeh/master/docs/Testdata/states/states.geojson")
df_cities = gpd.read_file(
    r"https://raw.githubusercontent.com/PatrikHlobil/Pandas-Bokeh/master/docs/Testdata/populated%20places/ne_10m_populated_places_simple_bigcities.geojson"
)
df_cities["size"] = df_cities.pop_max / 400000

#Plot shapes of US states (pass figure options to this initial plot):
figure = df_states.plot_bokeh(
    figsize=(800, 450),
    simplify_shapes=10000,
    show_figure=False,
    xlim=[-170, -80],
    ylim=[10, 70],
    category="REGION",
    colormap="Dark2",
    legend="States",
    show_colorbar=False,
)

#Plot cities as points on top of the US states layer by passing the figure:
df_cities.plot_bokeh(
    figure=figure,         # <== pass figure here!
    category="pop_max",
    colormap="Viridis",
    colormap_uselog=True,
    size="size",
    hovertool_string="""<h1>@name</h1>
                        <h3>Population: @pop_max </h3>""",
    marker="inverted_triangle",
    legend="Cities",
)

Multiple Geolayers


Point & Line plots:

Below, you can see an example that use Pandas-Bokeh to plot point data on a map. The plot shows all cities with a population larger than 1.000.000. For point plots, you can select the marker as keyword argument (since it is passed to bokeh.plotting.figure.scatter). Here an overview of all available marker types:

gdf = gpd.read_file(r"https://raw.githubusercontent.com/PatrikHlobil/Pandas-Bokeh/master/docs/Testdata/populated%20places/ne_10m_populated_places_simple_bigcities.geojson")
gdf["size"] = gdf.pop_max / 400000

gdf.plot_bokeh(
    category="pop_max",
    colormap="Viridis",
    colormap_uselog=True,
    size="size",
    hovertool_string="""<h1>@name</h1>
                        <h3>Population: @pop_max </h3>""",
    xlim=[-15, 35],
    ylim=[30,60],
    marker="inverted_triangle");

Pointmap

In a similar way, also GeoDataFrames with (multi)line shapes can be drawn using Pandas-Bokeh.


 


Colorbar formatting:

If you want to display the numerical labels on your colorbar with an alternative to the scientific format, you can pass in a one of the bokeh number string formats or an instance of one of the bokeh.models.formatters to the colorbar_tick_format argument in the geoplot

An example of using the string format argument:

df_states = gpd.read_file(r"https://raw.githubusercontent.com/PatrikHlobil/Pandas-Bokeh/master/docs/Testdata/states/states.geojson")

df_states["STATE_NAME_SMALL"] = df_states["STATE_NAME"].str.lower()

# pass in a string format to colorbar_tick_format to display the ticks as 10m rather than 1e7
df_states.plot_bokeh(
    figsize=(900, 600),
    category="POPESTIMATE2017",
    simplify_shapes=5000,    
    colormap="Inferno",
    colormap_uselog=True,
    colorbar_tick_format="0.0a")

colorbar_tick_format with string argument

An example of using the bokeh PrintfTickFormatter:

df_states = gpd.read_file(r"https://raw.githubusercontent.com/PatrikHlobil/Pandas-Bokeh/master/docs/Testdata/states/states.geojson")

df_states["STATE_NAME_SMALL"] = df_states["STATE_NAME"].str.lower()

for i in range(8):
    df_states["Delta_Population_201%d"%i] = ((df_states["POPESTIMATE201%d"%i] / df_states["POPESTIMATE2010"]) -1 ) * 100

# pass in a PrintfTickFormatter instance colorbar_tick_format to display the ticks with 2 decimal places  
df_states.plot_bokeh(
    figsize=(900, 600),
    category="Delta_Population_2017",
    simplify_shapes=5000,    
    colormap="Inferno",
    colorbar_tick_format=PrintfTickFormatter(format="%4.2f"))

colorbar_tick_format with bokeh.models.formatter_instance


Outputs, Formatting & Layouts

Output options

The pandas.DataFrame.plot_bokeh API has the following additional keyword arguments:

  • show_figure: If True, the resulting figure is shown (either in the notebook or exported and shown as HTML file, see Basics. If False, None is returned. Default: True
  • return_html: If True, the method call returns an HTML string that contains all Bokeh CSS&JS resources and the figure embedded in a div. This HTML representation of the plot can be used for embedding the plot in an HTML document. Default: False

If you have a Bokeh figure or layout, you can also use the pandas_bokeh.embedded_html function to generate an embeddable HTML representation of the plot. This can be included into any valid HTML (note that this is not possible directly with the HTML generated by the pandas_bokeh.output_file output option, because it includes an HTML header). Let us consider the following simple example:

#Import Pandas and Pandas-Bokeh (if you do not specify an output option, the standard is
#output_file):
import pandas as pd
import pandas_bokeh

#Create DataFrame to Plot:
import numpy as np
x = np.arange(-10, 10, 0.1)
sin = np.sin(x)
cos = np.cos(x)
tan = np.tan(x)
df = pd.DataFrame({"x": x, "sin(x)": sin, "cos(x)": cos, "tan(x)": tan})

#Make Bokeh plot from DataFrame using Pandas-Bokeh. Do not show the plot, but export
#it to an embeddable HTML string:
html_plot = df.plot_bokeh(
    kind="line",
    x="x",
    y=["sin(x)", "cos(x)", "tan(x)"],
    xticks=range(-20, 20),
    title="Trigonometric functions",
    show_figure=False,
    return_html=True,
    ylim=(-1.5, 1.5))

#Write some HTML and embed the HTML plot below it. For production use, please use
#Templates and the awesome Jinja library.
html = r"""
<script type="text/x-mathjax-config">
  MathJax.Hub.Config({tex2jax: {inlineMath: [['$','$'], ['\\(','\\)']]}});
</script>
<script type="text/javascript"
  src="http://cdn.mathjax.org/mathjax/latest/MathJax.js?config=TeX-AMS-MML_HTMLorMML">
</script>

<h1> Trigonometric functions </h1>

<p> The basic trigonometric functions are:</p>

<p>$ sin(x) $</p>
<p>$ cos(x) $</p>
<p>$ tan(x) = \frac{sin(x)}{cos(x)}$</p>

<p>Below is a plot that shows them</p>

""" + html_plot

#Export the HTML string to an external HTML file and show it:
with open("test.html" , "w") as f:
    f.write(html)
    
import webbrowser
webbrowser.open("test.html")

This code will open up a webbrowser and show the following page. As you can see, the interactive Bokeh plot is embedded nicely into the HTML layout. The return_html option is ideal for the use in a templating engine like Jinja.

Embedded HTML

Auto Scaling Plots

For single plots that have a number of x axis values or for larger monitors, you can auto scale the figure to the width of the entire jupyter cell by setting the sizing_mode parameter.

df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.rand(10, 4), columns=['a', 'b', 'c', 'd']) df.plot_bokeh(kind="bar", figsize=(500, 200), sizing_mode="scale_width")

Scaled Plot

The figsize parameter can be used to change the height and width as well as act as a scaling multiplier against the axis that is not being scaled.

 

Number formats

To change the formats of numbers in the hovertool, use the number_format keyword argument. For a documentation about the format to pass, have a look at the Bokeh documentation.Let us consider some examples for the number 3.141592653589793:

FormatOutput
03
0.0003.141
0.00 $3.14 $

This number format will be applied to all numeric columns of the hovertool. If you want to make a very custom or complicated hovertool, you should probably use the hovertool_string keyword argument, see e.g. this example. Below, we use the number_format parameter to specify the "Stock Price" format to 2 decimal digits and an additional $ sign.

import numpy as np

#Lineplot:
np.random.seed(42)
df = pd.DataFrame({
    "Google": np.random.randn(1000) + 0.2,
    "Apple": np.random.randn(1000) + 0.17
},
                  index=pd.date_range('1/1/2000', periods=1000))
df = df.cumsum()
df = df + 50
df.plot_bokeh(
    kind="line",
    title="Apple vs Google",
    xlabel="Date",
    ylabel="Stock price [$]",
    yticks=[0, 100, 200, 300, 400],
    ylim=(0, 400),
    colormap=["red", "blue"],
    number_format="1.00 $")

Number format

Suppress scientific notation for axes

If you want to suppress the scientific notation for axes, you can use the disable_scientific_axes parameter, which accepts one of "x", "y", "xy":

df = pd.DataFrame({"Animal": ["Mouse", "Rabbit", "Dog", "Tiger", "Elefant", "Wale"],
                   "Weight [g]": [19, 3000, 40000, 200000, 6000000, 50000000]})
p_scientific = df.plot_bokeh(x="Animal", y="Weight [g]", show_figure=False)
p_non_scientific = df.plot_bokeh(x="Animal", y="Weight [g]", disable_scientific_axes="y", show_figure=False,)
pandas_bokeh.plot_grid([[p_scientific, p_non_scientific]], plot_width = 450)

Number format

 

Dashboard Layouts

As shown in the Scatterplot Example, combining plots with plots or other HTML elements is straighforward in Pandas-Bokeh due to the layout capabilities of Bokeh. The easiest way to generate a dashboard layout is using the pandas_bokeh.plot_grid method (which is an extension of bokeh.layouts.gridplot):

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
import pandas_bokeh
pandas_bokeh.output_notebook()

#Barplot:
data = {
    'fruits':
    ['Apples', 'Pears', 'Nectarines', 'Plums', 'Grapes', 'Strawberries'],
    '2015': [2, 1, 4, 3, 2, 4],
    '2016': [5, 3, 3, 2, 4, 6],
    '2017': [3, 2, 4, 4, 5, 3]
}
df = pd.DataFrame(data).set_index("fruits")
p_bar = df.plot_bokeh(
    kind="bar",
    ylabel="Price per Unit [€]",
    title="Fruit prices per Year",
    show_figure=False)

#Lineplot:
np.random.seed(42)
df = pd.DataFrame({
    "Google": np.random.randn(1000) + 0.2,
    "Apple": np.random.randn(1000) + 0.17
},
                  index=pd.date_range('1/1/2000', periods=1000))
df = df.cumsum()
df = df + 50
p_line = df.plot_bokeh(
    kind="line",
    title="Apple vs Google",
    xlabel="Date",
    ylabel="Stock price [$]",
    yticks=[0, 100, 200, 300, 400],
    ylim=(0, 400),
    colormap=["red", "blue"],
    show_figure=False)

#Scatterplot:
from sklearn.datasets import load_iris
iris = load_iris()
df = pd.DataFrame(iris["data"])
df.columns = iris["feature_names"]
df["species"] = iris["target"]
df["species"] = df["species"].map(dict(zip(range(3), iris["target_names"])))
p_scatter = df.plot_bokeh(
    kind="scatter",
    x="petal length (cm)",
    y="sepal width (cm)",
    category="species",
    title="Iris DataSet Visualization",
    show_figure=False)

#Histogram:
df_hist = pd.DataFrame({
    'a': np.random.randn(1000) + 1,
    'b': np.random.randn(1000),
    'c': np.random.randn(1000) - 1
},
                       columns=['a', 'b', 'c'])

p_hist = df_hist.plot_bokeh(
    kind="hist",
    bins=np.arange(-6, 6.5, 0.5),
    vertical_xlabel=True,
    normed=100,
    hovertool=False,
    title="Normal distributions",
    show_figure=False)

#Make Dashboard with Grid Layout:
pandas_bokeh.plot_grid([[p_line, p_bar], 
                        [p_scatter, p_hist]], plot_width=450)

Dashboard Layout

Using a combination of row and column elements (see also Bokeh Layouts) allow for a very easy general arrangement of elements. An alternative layout to the one above is:

p_line.plot_width = 900
p_hist.plot_width = 900

layout = pandas_bokeh.column(p_line,
                pandas_bokeh.row(p_scatter, p_bar),
                p_hist)

pandas_bokeh.show(layout)

Alternative Dashboard Layout


 



 

 

Release Notes

Release Notes can be found here.

Contributing to Pandas-Bokeh

If you wish to contribute to the development of Pandas-Bokeh you can follow the instructions on the CONTRIBUTING.md.

 

Author: PatrikHlobil
Source Code: https://github.com/PatrikHlobil/Pandas-Bokeh 
License: MIT License

#machine-learning  #datavisualizations #python