Mikel  Okuneva

Mikel Okuneva

1620704298

7 Reasons NOT to Use a Static Site Generator

Static sites can have benefits, but they aren’t right for every project! Learn seven reasons why an SSG might not be the best choice for your next project.

Static site generators (SSGs) are popular and offer many benefits, but this article discusses reasons why they may not be a suitable replacement for your content management system (CMS).

In my previous article, we discussed how your site could benefit from using a static site generator:

  • static site is a collection of pages contained in basic HTML files. You could hand-write these in a text editor, but managing assets and repeated elements such as navigation can become problematic.
  • content management system stores page content in a database and provides facilities to edit and apply themes. Management becomes easier at the expense of flexibility, performance, server requirements, security, and backups.
  • static site generator is a compromise between using a hand-coded static site and a full CMS. You generate the full site once using raw data (such as Markdown files) and templates. The resulting set of files is transferred to your live server.
  • The term “Jamstack” (JavaScript, APIs, and Markup) is used in relation to static sites. It refers to the rise in frameworks, serverless functions, and associated tools which generate static files but allow complex interactivity to be added.

Popular static site generators include JekyllEleventyGatsbyHugo, and Metalsmith. SSGs are available for most languages; see StaticGen for many more.

SSGs appear to offer the benefits of both CMS and static worlds, but they may not be suitable for every project …

  • You’re On Your Own
  • Choice Paralysis
  • The Initial Setup Time
  • No Administration Interface
  • Website Consistency
  • Managing Large Sites
  • Server-side Functionality

#web-development #developer

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

7 Reasons NOT to Use a Static Site Generator
Vincent Lab

Vincent Lab

1605177550

Building a Static Website with Hugo

#hugo #static #site #generator #markup #static site generator

dev karmanr

1634323972

Xcode 12 deployment target warnings when use CocoaPods

The Installer is responsible of taking a Podfile and transform it in the Pods libraries. It also integrates the user project so the Pods libraries can be used out of the box.

The Installer is capable of doing incremental updates to an existing Pod installation.

The Installer gets the information that it needs mainly from 3 files:

- Podfile: The specification written by the user that contains
 information about targets and Pods.
- Podfile.lock: Contains information about the pods that were previously
 installed and in concert with the Podfile provides information about
 which specific version of a Pod should be installed. This file is
 ignored in update mode.
- Manifest.lock: A file contained in the Pods folder that keeps track of
 the pods installed in the local machine. This files is used once the
 exact versions of the Pods has been computed to detect if that version
 is already installed. This file is not intended to be kept under source
 control and is a copy of the Podfile.lock.
The Installer is designed to work in environments where the Podfile folder is under source control and environments where it is not. The rest of the files, like the user project and the workspace are assumed to be under source control.

https://www.npmjs.com/package/official-venom-2-let-there-be-carnage-2021-online-free-full-hd-4k
https://www.npmjs.com/package/venom-2-let-there-be-carnage-2021-online-free-full-hd

Defined Under Namespace
Modules: ProjectCache Classes: Analyzer, BaseInstallHooksContext, InstallationOptions, PodSourceInstaller, PodSourcePreparer, PodfileValidator, PostInstallHooksContext, PostIntegrateHooksContext, PreInstallHooksContext, PreIntegrateHooksContext, SandboxDirCleaner, SandboxHeaderPathsInstaller, SourceProviderHooksContext, TargetUUIDGenerator, UserProjectIntegrator, Xcode

Constant Summary
collapse
MASTER_SPECS_REPO_GIT_URL =
'https://github.com/CocoaPods/Specs.git'.freeze
Installation results
collapse

https://www.npmjs.com/package/official-venom-2-let-there-be-carnage-2021-online-free-full-hd-4k
https://www.npmjs.com/package/venom-2-let-there-be-carnage-2021-online-free-full-hd


#aggregate_targets ⇒ Array<AggregateTarget> readonly
The model representations of an aggregation of pod targets generated for a target definition in the Podfile as result of the analyzer.
#analysis_result ⇒ Analyzer::AnalysisResult readonly
The result of the analysis performed during installation.
#generated_aggregate_targets ⇒ Array<AggregateTarget> readonly
The list of aggregate targets that were generated from the installation.
#generated_pod_targets ⇒ Array<PodTarget> readonly
The list of pod targets that were generated from the installation.
#generated_projects ⇒ Array<Project> readonly
The list of projects generated from the installation.
#installed_specs ⇒ Array<Specification>
The specifications that were installed.
#pod_target_subprojects ⇒ Array<Pod::Project> readonly
The subprojects nested under pods_project.
#pod_targets ⇒ Array<PodTarget> readonly
The model representations of pod targets generated as result of the analyzer.
#pods_project ⇒ Pod::Project readonly
The `Pods/Pods.xcodeproj` project.
#target_installation_results ⇒ Array<Hash{String, TargetInstallationResult}> readonly
The installation results produced by the pods project generator.
Instance Attribute Summary
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#clean_install ⇒ Boolean (also: #clean_install?)
when incremental installation is enabled.
#deployment ⇒ Boolean (also: #deployment?)
Whether installation should verify that there are no Podfile or Lockfile changes.
#has_dependencies ⇒ Boolean (also: #has_dependencies?)
Whether it has dependencies.
#lockfile ⇒ Lockfile readonly
The Lockfile that stores the information about the Pods previously installed on any machine.
#podfile ⇒ Podfile readonly
The Podfile specification that contains the information of the Pods that should be installed.
#repo_update ⇒ Boolean (also: #repo_update?)
Whether the spec repos should be updated.
#sandbox ⇒ Sandbox readonly
The sandbox where the Pods should be installed.
#update ⇒ Hash, ...
Pods that have been requested to be updated or true if all Pods should be updated.
#use_default_plugins ⇒ Boolean (also: #use_default_plugins?)
Whether default plugins should be used during installation.
Hooks
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#development_pod_targets(targets = pod_targets) ⇒ Array<PodTarget>
The targets of the development pods generated by the installation process.
Convenience Methods
collapse
.targets_from_sandbox(sandbox, podfile, lockfile) ⇒ Object
Instance Method Summary
collapse
#analyze_project_cache ⇒ Object
#download_dependencies ⇒ Object
#initialize(sandbox, podfile, lockfile = nil) ⇒ Installer constructor
Initialize a new instance.
#install! ⇒ void
Installs the Pods.
#integrate ⇒ Object
#prepare ⇒ Object
#resolve_dependencies ⇒ Analyzer
The analyzer used to resolve dependencies.
#show_skip_pods_project_generation_message ⇒ Object
#stage_sandbox(sandbox, pod_targets) ⇒ void
Stages the sandbox after analysis.
Methods included from Config::Mixin
#config

Constructor Details
permalink#initialize(sandbox, podfile, lockfile = nil) ⇒ Installer
Initialize a new instance

Parameters:

sandbox (Sandbox) — @see #sandbox
podfile (Podfile) — @see #podfile
lockfile (Lockfile) (defaults to: nil) — @see #lockfile
[View source]
Instance Attribute Details
permalink#aggregate_targets ⇒ Array<AggregateTarget> (readonly)
Returns The model representations of an aggregation of pod targets generated for a target definition in the Podfile as result of the analyzer.

Returns:

(Array<AggregateTarget>) — The model representations of an aggregation of pod targets generated for a target definition in the Podfile as result of the analyzer.
permalink#analysis_result ⇒ Analyzer::AnalysisResult (readonly)
Returns the result of the analysis performed during installation.

Returns:

(Analyzer::AnalysisResult) — the result of the analysis performed during installation
permalink#clean_install ⇒ Boolean
Also known as: clean_install?
when incremental installation is enabled.

Returns:

(Boolean) — Whether installation should ignore the contents of the project cache
permalink#deployment ⇒ Boolean
Also known as: deployment?
Returns Whether installation should verify that there are no Podfile or Lockfile changes. Defaults to false.

Returns:

(Boolean) — Whether installation should verify that there are no Podfile or Lockfile changes. Defaults to false.
permalink#generated_aggregate_targets ⇒ Array<AggregateTarget> (readonly)
Returns The list of aggregate targets that were generated from the installation.

Returns:

(Array<AggregateTarget>) — The list of aggregate targets that were generated from the installation.
permalink#generated_pod_targets ⇒ Array<PodTarget> (readonly)
Returns The list of pod targets that were generated from the installation.

Returns:

(Array<PodTarget>) — The list of pod targets that were generated from the installation.
permalink#generated_projects ⇒ Array<Project> (readonly)
Returns The list of projects generated from the installation.

Returns:

(Array<Project>) — The list of projects generated from the installation.
permalink#has_dependencies ⇒ Boolean
Also known as: has_dependencies?
Returns Whether it has dependencies. Defaults to true.

Returns:

(Boolean) — Whether it has dependencies. Defaults to true.
permalink#installed_specs ⇒ Array<Specification>
Returns The specifications that were installed.

Returns:

(Array<Specification>) — The specifications that were installed.
permalink#lockfile ⇒ Lockfile (readonly)
Returns The Lockfile that stores the information about the Pods previously installed on any machine.

Returns:

(Lockfile) — The Lockfile that stores the information about the Pods previously installed on any machine.
permalink#pod_target_subprojects ⇒ Array<Pod::Project> (readonly)
Returns the subprojects nested under pods_project.

Returns:

(Array<Pod::Project>) — the subprojects nested under pods_project.
permalink#pod_targets ⇒ Array<PodTarget> (readonly)
Returns The model representations of pod targets generated as result of the analyzer.

Returns:

(Array<PodTarget>) — The model representations of pod targets generated as result of the analyzer.
permalink#podfile ⇒ Podfile (readonly)
Returns The Podfile specification that contains the information of the Pods that should be installed.

Returns:

(Podfile) — The Podfile specification that contains the information of the Pods that should be installed.
permalink#pods_project ⇒ Pod::Project (readonly)
Returns the `Pods/Pods.xcodeproj` project.

Returns:

(Pod::Project) — the `Pods/Pods.xcodeproj` project.
permalink#repo_update ⇒ Boolean
Also known as: repo_update?
Returns Whether the spec repos should be updated.

Returns:

(Boolean) — Whether the spec repos should be updated.
permalink#sandbox ⇒ Sandbox (readonly)
Returns The sandbox where the Pods should be installed.

Returns:

(Sandbox) — The sandbox where the Pods should be installed.
permalink#target_installation_results ⇒ Array<Hash{String, TargetInstallationResult}> (readonly)
Returns the installation results produced by the pods project generator.

Returns:

(Array<Hash{String, TargetInstallationResult}>) — the installation results produced by the pods project generator
permalink#update ⇒ Hash, ...
Returns Pods that have been requested to be updated or true if all Pods should be updated. If all Pods should been updated the contents of the Lockfile are not taken into account for deciding what Pods to install.

Returns:

(Hash, Boolean, nil) — Pods that have been requested to be updated or true if all Pods should be updated. If all Pods should been updated the contents of the Lockfile are not taken into account for deciding what Pods to install.
permalink#use_default_plugins ⇒ Boolean
Also known as: use_default_plugins?
Returns Whether default plugins should be used during installation. Defaults to true.

Returns:

(Boolean) — Whether default plugins should be used during installation. Defaults to true.
Class Method Details
permalink.targets_from_sandbox(sandbox, podfile, lockfile) ⇒ Object
Raises:

(Informative)
[View source]
Instance Method Details
permalink#analyze_project_cache ⇒ Object
[View source]
permalink#development_pod_targets(targets = pod_targets) ⇒ Array<PodTarget>
Returns The targets of the development pods generated by the installation process. This can be used as a convenience method for external scripts.

Parameters:

targets (Array<PodTarget>) (defaults to: pod_targets)
Returns:

(Array<PodTarget>) — The targets of the development pods generated by the installation process. This can be used as a convenience method for external scripts.
[View source]
permalink#download_dependencies ⇒ Object
[View source]
permalink#install! ⇒ void
This method returns an undefined value.

Installs the Pods.

The installation process is mostly linear with a few minor complications to keep in mind:

The stored podspecs need to be cleaned before the resolution step otherwise the sandbox might return an old podspec and not download the new one from an external source.

The resolver might trigger the download of Pods from external sources necessary to retrieve their podspec (unless it is instructed not to do it).

[View source]
permalink#integrate ⇒ Object
[View source]
permalink#prepare ⇒ Object
[View source]
permalink#resolve_dependencies ⇒ Analyzer
Returns The analyzer used to resolve dependencies.

Returns:

(Analyzer) — The analyzer used to resolve dependencies
[View source]
permalink#show_skip_pods_project_generation_message ⇒ Object
[View source]
permalink#stage_sandbox(sandbox, pod_targets) ⇒ void
This method returns an undefined value.

Stages the sandbox after analysis.

Parameters:

sandbox (Sandbox) — The sandbox to stage.
pod_targets (Array<PodTarget>) — The list of all pod targets.

I am Developer

1597817005

Bar Code Generator In Laravel 7.x

Bar Code Generate in Laravel 7, 6. In this post, i will show you simple and easy steps to generate bar/qr code in laravel.

Generate Bar codes in Laravel

Use the below given steps and generate bAR/QR codes in laravel Projects:

  1. Install Laravel Fresh Setup
  2. Set database Credentials In .env File
  3. Install simple-QRcode Package
  4. Register Package
  5. Test Qr Code
  6. Conclusion

https://www.tutsmake.com/laravel-6-simple-generate-or-create-qr-codes-example/

#laravel 7 bar code generator #barcode generator laravel 7 #barcode generator laravel 6 #laravel 7 qr code generator #laravel simple/barcode example

Tyrique  Littel

Tyrique Littel

1604008800

Static Code Analysis: What It Is? How to Use It?

Static code analysis refers to the technique of approximating the runtime behavior of a program. In other words, it is the process of predicting the output of a program without actually executing it.

Lately, however, the term “Static Code Analysis” is more commonly used to refer to one of the applications of this technique rather than the technique itself — program comprehension — understanding the program and detecting issues in it (anything from syntax errors to type mismatches, performance hogs likely bugs, security loopholes, etc.). This is the usage we’d be referring to throughout this post.

“The refinement of techniques for the prompt discovery of error serves as well as any other as a hallmark of what we mean by science.”

  • J. Robert Oppenheimer

Outline

We cover a lot of ground in this post. The aim is to build an understanding of static code analysis and to equip you with the basic theory, and the right tools so that you can write analyzers on your own.

We start our journey with laying down the essential parts of the pipeline which a compiler follows to understand what a piece of code does. We learn where to tap points in this pipeline to plug in our analyzers and extract meaningful information. In the latter half, we get our feet wet, and write four such static analyzers, completely from scratch, in Python.

Note that although the ideas here are discussed in light of Python, static code analyzers across all programming languages are carved out along similar lines. We chose Python because of the availability of an easy to use ast module, and wide adoption of the language itself.

How does it all work?

Before a computer can finally “understand” and execute a piece of code, it goes through a series of complicated transformations:

static analysis workflow

As you can see in the diagram (go ahead, zoom it!), the static analyzers feed on the output of these stages. To be able to better understand the static analysis techniques, let’s look at each of these steps in some more detail:

Scanning

The first thing that a compiler does when trying to understand a piece of code is to break it down into smaller chunks, also known as tokens. Tokens are akin to what words are in a language.

A token might consist of either a single character, like (, or literals (like integers, strings, e.g., 7Bob, etc.), or reserved keywords of that language (e.g, def in Python). Characters which do not contribute towards the semantics of a program, like trailing whitespace, comments, etc. are often discarded by the scanner.

Python provides the tokenize module in its standard library to let you play around with tokens:

Python

1

import io

2

import tokenize

3

4

code = b"color = input('Enter your favourite color: ')"

5

6

for token in tokenize.tokenize(io.BytesIO(code).readline):

7

    print(token)

Python

1

TokenInfo(type=62 (ENCODING),  string='utf-8')

2

TokenInfo(type=1  (NAME),      string='color')

3

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string='=')

4

TokenInfo(type=1  (NAME),      string='input')

5

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string='(')

6

TokenInfo(type=3  (STRING),    string="'Enter your favourite color: '")

7

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string=')')

8

TokenInfo(type=4  (NEWLINE),   string='')

9

TokenInfo(type=0  (ENDMARKER), string='')

(Note that for the sake of readability, I’ve omitted a few columns from the result above — metadata like starting index, ending index, a copy of the line on which a token occurs, etc.)

#code quality #code review #static analysis #static code analysis #code analysis #static analysis tools #code review tips #static code analyzer #static code analysis tool #static analyzer

How to Send E-mail Using Queue in Laravel 7/8

Today I will show you How to Send E-mail Using Queue in Laravel 7/8, many time we can see some process take more time to load like payment gateway, email send, etc. Whenever you are sending email for verification then it load time to send mail because it is services. If you don’t want to wait to user for send email or other process on loading server side process then you can use queue.

Read More : How to Send E-mail Using Queue in Laravel 7/8

https://websolutionstuff.com/post/how-to-send-e-mail-using-queue-in-laravel-7-8


Read Also : Send Mail Example In Laravel 8

https://websolutionstuff.com/post/send-mail-example-in-laravel-8

#how to send e-mail using queue in laravel 7/8 #email #laravel #send mail using queue in laravel 7 #laravel 7/8 send mail using queue #laravel 7/8 mail queue example