How to Install and Configure the Kubernetes Dashboard

The web-based Kubernetes console is an interface that provides information about the state of the Kubernetes cluster. The dashboard is also used for deploying containerized applications as well as for general cluster resource management. Traditionally, kubectl is primarily used in the terminal for nearly all cluster related tasks. Still, it is useful to have a visual representation of our cluster in a user-friendly interface. To install the dashboard, kubectl needs to be installed and running on the server.

dashboard1

Deploy Kubernetes Dashboard

First, we will deploy the k8s dashboard using the kubectl command in the terminal.

root@host:~## kubectl apply -f https://raw.githubusercontent.com/kubernetes/dashboard/v2.0.0/aio/deploy/recommended.yaml 
namespace/kubernetes-dashboard created
serviceaccount/kubernetes-dashboard created
service/kubernetes-dashboard created
secret/kubernetes-dashboard-certs created
secret/kubernetes-dashboard-csrf created
secret/kubernetes-dashboard-key-holder created
configmap/kubernetes-dashboard-settings created
role.rbac.authorization.k8s.io/kubernetes-dashboard created
clusterrole.rbac.authorization.k8s.io/kubernetes-dashboard created
rolebinding.rbac.authorization.k8s.io/kubernetes-dashboard created
clusterrolebinding.rbac.authorization.k8s.io/kubernetes-dashboard created
deployment.apps/kubernetes-dashboard created
service/dashboard-metrics-scraper created
deployment.apps/dashboard-metrics-scraper created
root@host:~#

Import Default Configuration

Next, we will download a default configuration to our server.

root@host:~## wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/kubernetes/dashboard/master/aio/deploy/recommended.yaml
--2020-10-23 22:41:43-- https://raw.githubusercontent.com/kubernetes/dashboard/master/aio/deploy/recommended.yaml
Resolving raw.githubusercontent.com (raw.githubusercontent.com)... 151.101.112.133
Connecting to raw.githubusercontent.com (raw.githubusercontent.com)|151.101.112.133|:443... connected.
HTTP request sent, awaiting response... 200 OK
Length: 7552 (7.4K) [text/plain]
Saving to: 'recommended.yaml'

recommended.yaml 100%[======================>] 7.38K --.-KB/s    in 0s      

2020-10-23 22:41:44 (22.5 MB/s) - 'recommended.yaml' saved [7552/7552]
root@host:~# 

Reconfigure

We will replace the default configuration file with the one we have just downloaded, edit it, and then apply the specific changes unique to our settings.

root@host:~## mv recommended.yaml kubernetes-dashboard-deployment.yml
root@host:~#

Now, we should edit the configuration file and enter the following settings.

root@host:~## vim kubernetes-dashboard-deployment.yml
kind: Service
apiVersion: v1
metadata:
  labels:
    k8s-app: kubernetes-dashboard
  name: kubernetes-dashboard
  namespace: kubernetes-dashboard
spec:
  ports:
    - port: 443
      targetPort: 8443
  selector:
    k8s-app: kubernetes-dashboard
  type: NodePort

Note:

The NodePort setting provides a Service on each host IP address on a static port. The default is ClusterIP, a service in which NodePort Service routes are automatically created.

Lastly, save and exit the file using the :wq command in vim.

Apply Changes

To apply our changes, we will use the kubectl apply command to implement the previous modifications we made to our configuration. This effectively locks in our updates, which are then applied to our existing system.

root@host:~## kubectl apply -f kubernetes-dashboard-deployment.yml
service/kubernetes-dashboard unchanged
serviceaccount/kubernetes-dashboard unchanged
secret/kubernetes-dashboard-certs unchanged
secret/kubernetes-dashboard-csrf unchanged
secret/kubernetes-dashboard-key-holder unchanged
configmap/kubernetes-dashboard-settings unchanged
role.rbac.authorization.k8s.io/kubernetes-dashboard unchanged
clusterrole.rbac.authorization.k8s.io/kubernetes-dashboard unchanged
rolebinding.rbac.authorization.k8s.io/kubernetes-dashboard unchanged
clusterrolebinding.rbac.authorization.k8s.io/kubernetes-dashboard unchanged
deployment.apps/kubernetes-dashboard unchanged
service/dashboard-metrics-scraper unchanged
deployment.apps/dashboard-metrics-scraper unchanged
root@host:~# 

Verify Status

Now we will check the Dashboard’s creation and deployment status using this command.

root@host:~## kubectl get deployments -n kubernetes-dashboard
NAME READY UP-TO-DATE AVAILABLE AGE
dashboard-metrics-scraper 1/1 1 1 10m
kubernetes-dashboard 1/1 1 1 10m
root@host:~#

Create Modules

Next, we will create two modules; one for the dashboard and one for the metrics. The dash n (-n) flag represents a namespace.

root@host:~## kubectl get pods -n kubernetes-dashboard
NAME READY STATUS RESTARTS AGE
dashboard-metrics-scraper-5997fdc798-7jr2t 1/1 Running 0 11m
kubernetes-dashboard-665f4c5ff-qb7sg 1/1 Running 0 11m
root@host:~#

Check Service

Now we can check the NodePort service that we modified earlier. Notice the kubectl get command now defines ‘services,’ which includes the nodeport IP’s.

root@host:~## kubectl get services -n kubernetes-dashboard 
NAME TYPE CLUSTER-IP EXTERNAL-IP PORT(S) AGE
dashboard-metrics-scraper ClusterIP 10.96.25.69 <none> 8000/TCP 12m
kubernetes-dashboard NodePort 10.98.129.73 <none> 443:30741/TCP 12m
root@host:~#

To use the Kubernetes Dashboard, we need to create an administrator user. The admin user can modify objects in all namespaces and manage any components of the cluster.

Create Manifest File

First, we will create a service account manifest file in which we will define the administrative user for kube-admin and the associated namespace they have access to.

root@host:~## vim admin-sa.yml

Next, we add the following information to the Yaml file and apply it using the kubectl apply command.

apiVersion: v1
kind: ServiceAccount
metadata:
  name: kube-admin
  namespace: kube-system

This command applies the specific settings.

root@host:~## kubectl apply -f admin-sa.yml
serviceaccount/kube-admin created
root@host:~# 

Next, we will bind the cluster-admin role to the created user.

root@host:~## vim admin-rbac.yml

Once the file is open in vim, enter the following information.

apiVersion: rbac.authorization.k8s.io/v1
kind: ClusterRoleBinding
metadata:
  name: kube-admin
roleRef:
  apiGroup: rbac.authorization.k8s.io
  kind: ClusterRole
  name: cluster-admin
subjects:
  - kind: ServiceAccount
    name: kube-admin
    namespace: kube-system

Save the file using the :wq command in vim and apply the changes to the file.

root@host:~## kubectl apply -f admin-rbac.yml
clusterrolebinding.rbac.authorization.k8s.io/kube-admin created
root@host:~#

Set Variable

In this step, we store the specific name of the service account.

root@host:~## SA_NAME="kube-admin"

Now we will generate a token for the account. This is necessary for security and further employment of the user in other systems, namespaces, or clusters.

root@host:~## kubectl -n kube-system describe secret $(kubectl -n kube-system get secret | grep ${SA_NAME} | awk '{print $1}')
Name: kube-admin-token-kz7b8
Namespace: kube-system
Labels: <none>
Annotations: kubernetes.io/service-account.name: kube-admin
              kubernetes.io/service-account.uid: c25ac94c-b48e-4bb8-8711-c851fdec9272

Type: kubernetes.io/service-account-token

Data
====
namespace: 11 bytes
token: eyJhbGciOiJSUzI1NiIsImtpZCI6IlAwQnJ0a1dldE1IQWpKSjRERzdZckRYVU9jT2o2N0JhUjBtOWI5Q1pBYzQifQ.eyJpc3MiOiJrdWJlcm5ldGVzL3NlcnZpY2VhY2NvdW50Iiwia3ViZXJuZXRlcy5pby9zZXJ2aWNlYWNjb3VudC9uYW1lc3BhY2UiOiJrdWJlLXN5c3RlbSIsImt1YmVybmV0ZXMuaW8vc2VydmljZWFjY291bnQvc2VjcmV0Lm5hbWUiOiJrdWJlLWFkbWluLXRva2VuLWt6N2I4Iiwia3ViZXJuZXRlcy5pby9zZXJ2aWNlYWNjb3VudC9zZXJ2aWNlLWFjY291bnQubmFtZSI6Imt1YmUtYWRtaW4iLCJrdWJlcm5ldGVzLmlvL3NlcnZpY2VhY2NvdW50L3NlcnZpY2UtYWNjb3VudC51aWQiOiJjMjVhYzk0Yy1iNDhlLTRiYjgtODcxMS1jODUxZmRlYzkyNzIiLCJzdWIiOiJzeXN0ZW06c2VydmljZWFjY291bnQ6a3ViZS1zeXN0ZW06a3ViZS1hZG1pbiJ9.i25cRCwfoK9WKjd9P3rRinRrXnzwkXjfTswFZXZrl9TG3SVOLf4ajgwX8a2VtohVdmkxlt_61ClcbunwFTC-YB0uM6ZT24RPgbQ9Ir7ApbTsR_m7IH_7ElfMuZjCQIXU1wTwmN-vWbqCIwnY0Mz2OptkdA8J_JeahPFJHyjwzBZsKCEVu5xqjPFCQoXRz1whKzuKrjIhRVuV5vp3dc4gV_7vbjaOWfCwscsnPsBvep0DQBcYlMwxxY-OTzH-FjBhRwA2HhofxnmGsx9qlXvYfVwb7oGMZTR0SDGTomb9qcgnP3LjQZDaneN6StGC_02EtDUsh9VrdeOOCV5Tfm5wcQ
ca.crt: 1066 bytes
root@host:~# 

We would advise keeping the token as secure as possible. After creating the token, we can finally access the dashboard control panel. Copy the key as we will need it momentarily to access the dashboard.

#kubernetes #devops

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How to Install and Configure the Kubernetes Dashboard
Christa  Stehr

Christa Stehr

1602964260

50+ Useful Kubernetes Tools for 2020 - Part 2

Introduction

Last year, we provided a list of Kubernetes tools that proved so popular we have decided to curate another list of some useful additions for working with the platform—among which are many tools that we personally use here at Caylent. Check out the original tools list here in case you missed it.

According to a recent survey done by Stackrox, the dominance Kubernetes enjoys in the market continues to be reinforced, with 86% of respondents using it for container orchestration.

(State of Kubernetes and Container Security, 2020)

And as you can see below, more and more companies are jumping into containerization for their apps. If you’re among them, here are some tools to aid you going forward as Kubernetes continues its rapid growth.

(State of Kubernetes and Container Security, 2020)

#blog #tools #amazon elastic kubernetes service #application security #aws kms #botkube #caylent #cli #container monitoring #container orchestration tools #container security #containers #continuous delivery #continuous deployment #continuous integration #contour #developers #development #developments #draft #eksctl #firewall #gcp #github #harbor #helm #helm charts #helm-2to3 #helm-aws-secret-plugin #helm-docs #helm-operator-get-started #helm-secrets #iam #json #k-rail #k3s #k3sup #k8s #keel.sh #keycloak #kiali #kiam #klum #knative #krew #ksniff #kube #kube-prod-runtime #kube-ps1 #kube-scan #kube-state-metrics #kube2iam #kubeapps #kubebuilder #kubeconfig #kubectl #kubectl-aws-secrets #kubefwd #kubernetes #kubernetes command line tool #kubernetes configuration #kubernetes deployment #kubernetes in development #kubernetes in production #kubernetes ingress #kubernetes interfaces #kubernetes monitoring #kubernetes networking #kubernetes observability #kubernetes plugins #kubernetes secrets #kubernetes security #kubernetes security best practices #kubernetes security vendors #kubernetes service discovery #kubernetic #kubesec #kubeterminal #kubeval #kudo #kuma #microsoft azure key vault #mozilla sops #octant #octarine #open source #palo alto kubernetes security #permission-manager #pgp #rafay #rakess #rancher #rook #secrets operations #serverless function #service mesh #shell-operator #snyk #snyk container #sonobuoy #strongdm #tcpdump #tenkai #testing #tigera #tilt #vert.x #wireshark #yaml

Background Fetch for React Native Apps

react-native-background-fetch

Background Fetch is a very simple plugin which attempts to awaken an app in the background about every 15 minutes, providing a short period of background running-time. This plugin will execute your provided callbackFn whenever a background-fetch event occurs.

There is no way to increase the rate which a fetch-event occurs and this plugin sets the rate to the most frequent possible — you will never receive an event faster than 15 minutes. The operating-system will automatically throttle the rate the background-fetch events occur based upon usage patterns. Eg: if user hasn't turned on their phone for a long period of time, fetch events will occur less frequently or if an iOS user disables background refresh they may not happen at all.

:new: Background Fetch now provides a scheduleTask method for scheduling arbitrary "one-shot" or periodic tasks.

iOS

  • There is no way to increase the rate which a fetch-event occurs and this plugin sets the rate to the most frequent possible — you will never receive an event faster than 15 minutes. The operating-system will automatically throttle the rate the background-fetch events occur based upon usage patterns. Eg: if user hasn't turned on their phone for a long period of time, fetch events will occur less frequently.
  • scheduleTask seems only to fire when the device is plugged into power.
  • ⚠️ When your app is terminated, iOS no longer fires events — There is no such thing as stopOnTerminate: false for iOS.
  • iOS can take days before Apple's machine-learning algorithm settles in and begins regularly firing events. Do not sit staring at your logs waiting for an event to fire. If your simulated events work, that's all you need to know that everything is correctly configured.
  • If the user doesn't open your iOS app for long periods of time, iOS will stop firing events.

Android

Installing the plugin

⚠️ If you have a previous version of react-native-background-fetch < 2.7.0 installed into react-native >= 0.60, you should first unlink your previous version as react-native link is no longer required.

$ react-native unlink react-native-background-fetch

With yarn

$ yarn add react-native-background-fetch

With npm

$ npm install --save react-native-background-fetch

Setup Guides

iOS Setup

react-native >= 0.60

Android Setup

react-native >= 0.60

Example

ℹ️ This repo contains its own Example App. See /example

import React from 'react';
import {
  SafeAreaView,
  StyleSheet,
  ScrollView,
  View,
  Text,
  FlatList,
  StatusBar,
} from 'react-native';

import {
  Header,
  Colors
} from 'react-native/Libraries/NewAppScreen';

import BackgroundFetch from "react-native-background-fetch";

class App extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = {
      events: []
    };
  }

  componentDidMount() {
    // Initialize BackgroundFetch ONLY ONCE when component mounts.
    this.initBackgroundFetch();
  }

  async initBackgroundFetch() {
    // BackgroundFetch event handler.
    const onEvent = async (taskId) => {
      console.log('[BackgroundFetch] task: ', taskId);
      // Do your background work...
      await this.addEvent(taskId);
      // IMPORTANT:  You must signal to the OS that your task is complete.
      BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
    }

    // Timeout callback is executed when your Task has exceeded its allowed running-time.
    // You must stop what you're doing immediately BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId)
    const onTimeout = async (taskId) => {
      console.warn('[BackgroundFetch] TIMEOUT task: ', taskId);
      BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
    }

    // Initialize BackgroundFetch only once when component mounts.
    let status = await BackgroundFetch.configure({minimumFetchInterval: 15}, onEvent, onTimeout);

    console.log('[BackgroundFetch] configure status: ', status);
  }

  // Add a BackgroundFetch event to <FlatList>
  addEvent(taskId) {
    // Simulate a possibly long-running asynchronous task with a Promise.
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
      this.setState(state => ({
        events: [...state.events, {
          taskId: taskId,
          timestamp: (new Date()).toString()
        }]
      }));
      resolve();
    });
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <>
        <StatusBar barStyle="dark-content" />
        <SafeAreaView>
          <ScrollView
            contentInsetAdjustmentBehavior="automatic"
            style={styles.scrollView}>
            <Header />

            <View style={styles.body}>
              <View style={styles.sectionContainer}>
                <Text style={styles.sectionTitle}>BackgroundFetch Demo</Text>
              </View>
            </View>
          </ScrollView>
          <View style={styles.sectionContainer}>
            <FlatList
              data={this.state.events}
              renderItem={({item}) => (<Text>[{item.taskId}]: {item.timestamp}</Text>)}
              keyExtractor={item => item.timestamp}
            />
          </View>
        </SafeAreaView>
      </>
    );
  }
}

const styles = StyleSheet.create({
  scrollView: {
    backgroundColor: Colors.lighter,
  },
  body: {
    backgroundColor: Colors.white,
  },
  sectionContainer: {
    marginTop: 32,
    paddingHorizontal: 24,
  },
  sectionTitle: {
    fontSize: 24,
    fontWeight: '600',
    color: Colors.black,
  },
  sectionDescription: {
    marginTop: 8,
    fontSize: 18,
    fontWeight: '400',
    color: Colors.dark,
  },
});

export default App;

Executing Custom Tasks

In addition to the default background-fetch task defined by BackgroundFetch.configure, you may also execute your own arbitrary "oneshot" or periodic tasks (iOS requires additional Setup Instructions). However, all events will be fired into the Callback provided to BackgroundFetch#configure:

⚠️ iOS:

  • scheduleTask on iOS seems only to run when the device is plugged into power.
  • scheduleTask on iOS are designed for low-priority tasks, such as purging cache files — they tend to be unreliable for mission-critical tasks. scheduleTask will never run as frequently as you want.
  • The default fetch event is much more reliable and fires far more often.
  • scheduleTask on iOS stop when the user terminates the app. There is no such thing as stopOnTerminate: false for iOS.
// Step 1:  Configure BackgroundFetch as usual.
let status = await BackgroundFetch.configure({
  minimumFetchInterval: 15
}, async (taskId) => {  // <-- Event callback
  // This is the fetch-event callback.
  console.log("[BackgroundFetch] taskId: ", taskId);

  // Use a switch statement to route task-handling.
  switch (taskId) {
    case 'com.foo.customtask':
      print("Received custom task");
      break;
    default:
      print("Default fetch task");
  }
  // Finish, providing received taskId.
  BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
}, async (taskId) => {  // <-- Task timeout callback
  // This task has exceeded its allowed running-time.
  // You must stop what you're doing and immediately .finish(taskId)
  BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
});

// Step 2:  Schedule a custom "oneshot" task "com.foo.customtask" to execute 5000ms from now.
BackgroundFetch.scheduleTask({
  taskId: "com.foo.customtask",
  forceAlarmManager: true,
  delay: 5000  // <-- milliseconds
});

API Documentation

Config

Common Options

@param {Integer} minimumFetchInterval [15]

The minimum interval in minutes to execute background fetch events. Defaults to 15 minutes. Note: Background-fetch events will never occur at a frequency higher than every 15 minutes. Apple uses a secret algorithm to adjust the frequency of fetch events, presumably based upon usage patterns of the app. Fetch events can occur less often than your configured minimumFetchInterval.

@param {Integer} delay (milliseconds)

ℹ️ Valid only for BackgroundFetch.scheduleTask. The minimum number of milliseconds in future that task should execute.

@param {Boolean} periodic [false]

ℹ️ Valid only for BackgroundFetch.scheduleTask. Defaults to false. Set true to execute the task repeatedly. When false, the task will execute just once.

Android Options

@config {Boolean} stopOnTerminate [true]

Set false to continue background-fetch events after user terminates the app. Default to true.

@config {Boolean} startOnBoot [false]

Set true to initiate background-fetch events when the device is rebooted. Defaults to false.

NOTE: startOnBoot requires stopOnTerminate: false.

@config {Boolean} forceAlarmManager [false]

By default, the plugin will use Android's JobScheduler when possible. The JobScheduler API prioritizes for battery-life, throttling task-execution based upon device usage and battery level.

Configuring forceAlarmManager: true will bypass JobScheduler to use Android's older AlarmManager API, resulting in more accurate task-execution at the cost of higher battery usage.

let status = await BackgroundFetch.configure({
  minimumFetchInterval: 15,
  forceAlarmManager: true
}, async (taskId) => {  // <-- Event callback
  console.log("[BackgroundFetch] taskId: ", taskId);
  BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
}, async (taskId) => {  // <-- Task timeout callback
  // This task has exceeded its allowed running-time.
  // You must stop what you're doing and immediately .finish(taskId)
  BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
});
.
.
.
// And with with #scheduleTask
BackgroundFetch.scheduleTask({
  taskId: 'com.foo.customtask',
  delay: 5000,       // milliseconds
  forceAlarmManager: true,
  periodic: false
});

@config {Boolean} enableHeadless [false]

Set true to enable React Native's Headless JS mechanism, for handling fetch events after app termination.

  • 📂 index.js (MUST BE IN index.js):
import BackgroundFetch from "react-native-background-fetch";

let MyHeadlessTask = async (event) => {
  // Get task id from event {}:
  let taskId = event.taskId;
  let isTimeout = event.timeout;  // <-- true when your background-time has expired.
  if (isTimeout) {
    // This task has exceeded its allowed running-time.
    // You must stop what you're doing immediately finish(taskId)
    console.log('[BackgroundFetch] Headless TIMEOUT:', taskId);
    BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
    return;
  }
  console.log('[BackgroundFetch HeadlessTask] start: ', taskId);

  // Perform an example HTTP request.
  // Important:  await asychronous tasks when using HeadlessJS.
  let response = await fetch('https://reactnative.dev/movies.json');
  let responseJson = await response.json();
  console.log('[BackgroundFetch HeadlessTask] response: ', responseJson);

  // Required:  Signal to native code that your task is complete.
  // If you don't do this, your app could be terminated and/or assigned
  // battery-blame for consuming too much time in background.
  BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
}

// Register your BackgroundFetch HeadlessTask
BackgroundFetch.registerHeadlessTask(MyHeadlessTask);

@config {integer} requiredNetworkType [BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_NONE]

Set basic description of the kind of network your job requires.

If your job doesn't need a network connection, you don't need to use this option as the default value is BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_NONE.

NetworkTypeDescription
BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_NONEThis job doesn't care about network constraints, either any or none.
BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_ANYThis job requires network connectivity.
BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_CELLULARThis job requires network connectivity that is a cellular network.
BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_UNMETEREDThis job requires network connectivity that is unmetered. Most WiFi networks are unmetered, as in "you can upload as much as you like".
BackgroundFetch.NETWORK_TYPE_NOT_ROAMINGThis job requires network connectivity that is not roaming (being outside the country of origin)

@config {Boolean} requiresBatteryNotLow [false]

Specify that to run this job, the device's battery level must not be low.

This defaults to false. If true, the job will only run when the battery level is not low, which is generally the point where the user is given a "low battery" warning.

@config {Boolean} requiresStorageNotLow [false]

Specify that to run this job, the device's available storage must not be low.

This defaults to false. If true, the job will only run when the device is not in a low storage state, which is generally the point where the user is given a "low storage" warning.

@config {Boolean} requiresCharging [false]

Specify that to run this job, the device must be charging (or be a non-battery-powered device connected to permanent power, such as Android TV devices). This defaults to false.

@config {Boolean} requiresDeviceIdle [false]

When set true, ensure that this job will not run if the device is in active use.

The default state is false: that is, the for the job to be runnable even when someone is interacting with the device.

This state is a loose definition provided by the system. In general, it means that the device is not currently being used interactively, and has not been in use for some time. As such, it is a good time to perform resource heavy jobs. Bear in mind that battery usage will still be attributed to your application, and shown to the user in battery stats.


Methods

Method NameArgumentsReturnsNotes
configure{FetchConfig}, callbackFn, timeoutFnPromise<BackgroundFetchStatus>Configures the plugin's callbackFn and timeoutFn. This callback will fire each time a background-fetch event occurs in addition to events from #scheduleTask. The timeoutFn will be called when the OS reports your task is nearing the end of its allowed background-time.
scheduleTask{TaskConfig}Promise<boolean>Executes a custom task. The task will be executed in the same Callback function provided to #configure.
statuscallbackFnPromise<BackgroundFetchStatus>Your callback will be executed with the current status (Integer) 0: Restricted, 1: Denied, 2: Available. These constants are defined as BackgroundFetch.STATUS_RESTRICTED, BackgroundFetch.STATUS_DENIED, BackgroundFetch.STATUS_AVAILABLE (NOTE: Android will always return STATUS_AVAILABLE)
finishString taskIdVoidYou MUST call this method in your callbackFn provided to #configure in order to signal to the OS that your task is complete. iOS provides only 30s of background-time for a fetch-event -- if you exceed this 30s, iOS will kill your app.
startnonePromise<BackgroundFetchStatus>Start the background-fetch API. Your callbackFn provided to #configure will be executed each time a background-fetch event occurs. NOTE the #configure method automatically calls #start. You do not have to call this method after you #configure the plugin
stop[taskId:String]Promise<boolean>Stop the background-fetch API and all #scheduleTask from firing events. Your callbackFn provided to #configure will no longer be executed. If you provide an optional taskId, only that #scheduleTask will be stopped.

Debugging

iOS

🆕 BGTaskScheduler API for iOS 13+

  • ⚠️ At the time of writing, the new task simulator does not yet work in Simulator; Only real devices.
  • See Apple docs Starting and Terminating Tasks During Development
  • After running your app in XCode, Click the [||] button to initiate a Breakpoint.
  • In the console (lldb), paste the following command (Note: use cursor up/down keys to cycle through previously run commands):
e -l objc -- (void)[[BGTaskScheduler sharedScheduler] _simulateLaunchForTaskWithIdentifier:@"com.transistorsoft.fetch"]
  • Click the [ > ] button to continue. The task will execute and the Callback function provided to BackgroundFetch.configure will receive the event.

Simulating task-timeout events

  • Only the new BGTaskScheduler api supports simulated task-timeout events. To simulate a task-timeout, your fetchCallback must not call BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId):
let status = await BackgroundFetch.configure({
  minimumFetchInterval: 15
}, async (taskId) => {  // <-- Event callback.
  // This is the task callback.
  console.log("[BackgroundFetch] taskId", taskId);
  //BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId); // <-- Disable .finish(taskId) when simulating an iOS task timeout
}, async (taskId) => {  // <-- Event timeout callback
  // This task has exceeded its allowed running-time.
  // You must stop what you're doing and immediately .finish(taskId)
  print("[BackgroundFetch] TIMEOUT taskId:", taskId);
  BackgroundFetch.finish(taskId);
});
  • Now simulate an iOS task timeout as follows, in the same manner as simulating an event above:
e -l objc -- (void)[[BGTaskScheduler sharedScheduler] _simulateExpirationForTaskWithIdentifier:@"com.transistorsoft.fetch"]

Old BackgroundFetch API

  • Simulate background fetch events in XCode using Debug->Simulate Background Fetch
  • iOS can take some hours or even days to start a consistently scheduling background-fetch events since iOS schedules fetch events based upon the user's patterns of activity. If Simulate Background Fetch works, your can be sure that everything is working fine. You just need to wait.

Android

  • Observe plugin logs in $ adb logcat:
$ adb logcat *:S ReactNative:V ReactNativeJS:V TSBackgroundFetch:V
  • Simulate a background-fetch event on a device (insert <your.application.id>) (only works for sdk 21+:
$ adb shell cmd jobscheduler run -f <your.application.id> 999
  • For devices with sdk <21, simulate a "Headless JS" event with (insert <your.application.id>)
$ adb shell am broadcast -a <your.application.id>.event.BACKGROUND_FETCH

Download Details:
Author: transistorsoft
Source Code: https://github.com/transistorsoft/react-native-background-fetch
License: MIT license

#react  #reactnative  #mobileapp  #javascript 

Maud  Rosenbaum

Maud Rosenbaum

1601051854

Kubernetes in the Cloud: Strategies for Effective Multi Cloud Implementations

Kubernetes is a highly popular container orchestration platform. Multi cloud is a strategy that leverages cloud resources from multiple vendors. Multi cloud strategies have become popular because they help prevent vendor lock-in and enable you to leverage a wide variety of cloud resources. However, multi cloud ecosystems are notoriously difficult to configure and maintain.

This article explains how you can leverage Kubernetes to reduce multi cloud complexities and improve stability, scalability, and velocity.

Kubernetes: Your Multi Cloud Strategy

Maintaining standardized application deployments becomes more challenging as your number of applications and the technologies they are based on increase. As environments, operating systems, and dependencies differ, management and operations require more effort and extensive documentation.

In the past, teams tried to get around these difficulties by creating isolated projects in the data center. Each project, including its configurations and requirements were managed independently. This required accurately predicting performance and the number of users before deployment and taking down applications to update operating systems or applications. There were many chances for error.

Kubernetes can provide an alternative to the old method, enabling teams to deploy applications independent of the environment in containers. This eliminates the need to create resource partitions and enables teams to operate infrastructure as a unified whole.

In particular, Kubernetes makes it easier to deploy a multi cloud strategy since it enables you to abstract away service differences. With Kubernetes deployments you can work from a consistent platform and optimize services and applications according to your business needs.

The Compelling Attributes of Multi Cloud Kubernetes

Multi cloud Kubernetes can provide multiple benefits beyond a single cloud deployment. Below are some of the most notable advantages.

Stability

In addition to the built-in scalability, fault tolerance, and auto-healing features of Kubernetes, multi cloud deployments can provide service redundancy. For example, you can mirror applications or split microservices across vendors. This reduces the risk of a vendor-related outage and enables you to create failovers.

#kubernetes #multicloud-strategy #kubernetes-cluster #kubernetes-top-story #kubernetes-cluster-install #kubernetes-explained #kubernetes-infrastructure #cloud

Mitchel  Carter

Mitchel Carter

1601305200

Microsoft Announces General Availability Of Bridge To Kubernetes

Recently, Microsoft announced the general availability of Bridge to Kubernetes, formerly known as Local Process with Kubernetes. It is an iterative development tool offered in Visual Studio and VS Code, which allows developers to write, test as well as debug microservice code on their development workstations while consuming dependencies and inheriting the existing configuration from a Kubernetes environment.

Nick Greenfield, Program Manager, Bridge to Kubernetes stated in an official blog post, “Bridge to Kubernetes is expanding support to any Kubernetes. Whether you’re connecting to your development cluster running in the cloud, or to your local Kubernetes cluster, Bridge to Kubernetes is available for your end-to-end debugging scenarios.”

Bridge to Kubernetes provides a number of compelling features. Some of them are mentioned below-

#news #bridge to kubernetes #developer tools #kubernetes #kubernetes platform #kubernetes tools #local process with kubernetes #microsoft

Houston  Sipes

Houston Sipes

1600992000

Did Google Open Sourcing Kubernetes Backfired?

Over the last few years, Kubernetes have become the de-facto standard for container orchestration and has also won the race against Docker for being the most loved platforms among developers. Released in 2014, Kubernetes has come a long way with currently being used across the entire cloudscape platforms. In fact, recent reports state that out of 109 tools to manage containers, 89% of them are leveraging Kubernetes versions.

Although inspired by Borg, Kubernetes, is an open-source project by Google, and has been donated to a vendor-neutral firm — The Cloud Native Computing Foundation. This could be attributed to Google’s vision of creating a platform that can be used by every firm of the world, including the large tech companies and can host multiple cloud platforms and data centres. The entire reason for handing over the control to CNCF is to develop the platform in the best interest of its users without vendor lock-in.

#opinions #google open source #google open source tools #google opening kubernetes #kubernetes #kubernetes platform #kubernetes tools #open source kubernetes backfired