Urban  Blanda

Urban Blanda

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Zero Trust Security

In this whiteboard video, Armon Dadgar answers the question: What is Zero Trust Security and Zero Trust Networking? How do I do it? and Why should I do it? If you’re moving your applications to cloud environments, this is a critical aspect of cloud security that you must understand.

#security

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Zero Trust Security
Wilford  Pagac

Wilford Pagac

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Best Custom Web & Mobile App Development Company

Everything around us has become smart, like smart infrastructures, smart cities, autonomous vehicles, to name a few. The innovation of smart devices makes it possible to achieve these heights in science and technology. But, data is vulnerable, there is a risk of attack by cybercriminals. To get started, let’s know about IoT devices.

What are IoT devices?

The Internet Of Things(IoT) is a system that interrelates computer devices like sensors, software, and actuators, digital machines, etc. They are linked together with particular objects that work through the internet and transfer data over devices without humans interference.

Famous examples are Amazon Alexa, Apple SIRI, Interconnected baby monitors, video doorbells, and smart thermostats.

How could your IoT devices be vulnerable?

When technologies grow and evolve, risks are also on the high stakes. Ransomware attacks are on the continuous increase; securing data has become the top priority.

When you think your smart home won’t fudge a thing against cybercriminals, you should also know that they are vulnerable. When cybercriminals access our smart voice speakers like Amazon Alexa or Apple Siri, it becomes easy for them to steal your data.

Cybersecurity report 2020 says popular hacking forums expose 770 million email addresses and 21 million unique passwords, 620 million accounts have been compromised from 16 hacked websites.

The attacks are likely to increase every year. To help you secure your data of IoT devices, here are some best tips you can implement.

Tips to secure your IoT devices

1. Change Default Router Name

Your router has the default name of make and model. When we stick with the manufacturer name, attackers can quickly identify our make and model. So give the router name different from your addresses, without giving away personal information.

2. Know your connected network and connected devices

If your devices are connected to the internet, these connections are vulnerable to cyber attacks when your devices don’t have the proper security. Almost every web interface is equipped with multiple devices, so it’s hard to track the device. But, it’s crucial to stay aware of them.

3. Change default usernames and passwords

When we use the default usernames and passwords, it is attackable. Because the cybercriminals possibly know the default passwords come with IoT devices. So use strong passwords to access our IoT devices.

4. Manage strong, Unique passwords for your IoT devices and accounts

Use strong or unique passwords that are easily assumed, such as ‘123456’ or ‘password1234’ to protect your accounts. Give strong and complex passwords formed by combinations of alphabets, numeric, and not easily bypassed symbols.

Also, change passwords for multiple accounts and change them regularly to avoid attacks. We can also set several attempts to wrong passwords to set locking the account to safeguard from the hackers.

5. Do not use Public WI-FI Networks

Are you try to keep an eye on your IoT devices through your mobile devices in different locations. I recommend you not to use the public WI-FI network to access them. Because they are easily accessible through for everyone, you are still in a hurry to access, use VPN that gives them protection against cyber-attacks, giving them privacy and security features, for example, using Express VPN.

6. Establish firewalls to discover the vulnerabilities

There are software and firewalls like intrusion detection system/intrusion prevention system in the market. This will be useful to screen and analyze the wire traffic of a network. You can identify the security weakness by the firewall scanners within the network structure. Use these firewalls to get rid of unwanted security issues and vulnerabilities.

7. Reconfigure your device settings

Every smart device comes with the insecure default settings, and sometimes we are not able to change these default settings configurations. These conditions need to be assessed and need to reconfigure the default settings.

8. Authenticate the IoT applications

Nowadays, every smart app offers authentication to secure the accounts. There are many types of authentication methods like single-factor authentication, two-step authentication, and multi-factor authentication. Use any one of these to send a one time password (OTP) to verify the user who logs in the smart device to keep our accounts from falling into the wrong hands.

9. Update the device software up to date

Every smart device manufacturer releases updates to fix bugs in their software. These security patches help us to improve our protection of the device. Also, update the software on the smartphone, which we are used to monitoring the IoT devices to avoid vulnerabilities.

10. Track the smartphones and keep them safe

When we connect the smart home to the smartphone and control them via smartphone, you need to keep them safe. If you miss the phone almost, every personal information is at risk to the cybercriminals. But sometimes it happens by accident, makes sure that you can clear all the data remotely.

However, securing smart devices is essential in the world of data. There are still cybercriminals bypassing the securities. So make sure to do the safety measures to avoid our accounts falling out into the wrong hands. I hope these steps will help you all to secure your IoT devices.

If you have any, feel free to share them in the comments! I’d love to know them.

Are you looking for more? Subscribe to weekly newsletters that can help your stay updated IoT application developments.

#iot #enterprise iot security #how iot can be used to enhance security #how to improve iot security #how to protect iot devices from hackers #how to secure iot devices #iot security #iot security devices #iot security offerings #iot security technologies iot security plus #iot vulnerable devices #risk based iot security program

Perl Critic: The Leading Static analyzer for Perl

BUILD STATUS

NAME

Perl::Critic - Critique Perl source code for best-practices.

SYNOPSIS

use Perl::Critic;
my $file = shift;
my $critic = Perl::Critic->new();
my @violations = $critic->critique($file);
print @violations;

DESCRIPTION

Perl::Critic is an extensible framework for creating and applying coding standards to Perl source code. Essentially, it is a static source code analysis engine. Perl::Critic is distributed with a number of Perl::Critic::Policy modules that attempt to enforce various coding guidelines. Most Policy modules are based on Damian Conway's book Perl Best Practices. However, Perl::Critic is not limited to PBP and will even support Policies that contradict Conway. You can enable, disable, and customize those Polices through the Perl::Critic interface. You can also create new Policy modules that suit your own tastes.

For a command-line interface to Perl::Critic, see the documentation for perlcritic. If you want to integrate Perl::Critic with your build process, Test::Perl::Critic provides an interface that is suitable for test programs. Also, Test::Perl::Critic::Progressive is useful for gradually applying coding standards to legacy code. For the ultimate convenience (at the expense of some flexibility) see the criticism pragma.

If you'd like to try Perl::Critic without installing anything, there is a web-service available at http://perlcritic.com. The web-service does not yet support all the configuration features that are available in the native Perl::Critic API, but it should give you a good idea of what it does.

Also, ActivePerl includes a very slick graphical interface to Perl-Critic called perlcritic-gui. You can get a free community edition of ActivePerl from http://www.activestate.com.

PREREQUISITES

Perl::Critic runs on Perl back to Perl 5.6.1. It relies on the PPI module to do the heavy work of parsing Perl.

INTERFACE SUPPORT

The Perl::Critic module is considered to be a public class. Any changes to its interface will go through a deprecation cycle.

CONSTRUCTOR

new( [ -profile => $FILE, -severity => $N, -theme => $string, -include => \@PATTERNS, -exclude => \@PATTERNS, -top => $N, -only => $B, -profile-strictness => $PROFILE_STRICTNESS_{WARN|FATAL|QUIET}, -force => $B, -verbose => $N ], -color => $B, -pager => $string, -allow-unsafe => $B, -criticism-fatal => $B)

new()

Returns a reference to a new Perl::Critic object. Most arguments are just passed directly into Perl::Critic::Config, but I have described them here as well. The default value for all arguments can be defined in your .perlcriticrc file. See the "CONFIGURATION" section for more information about that. All arguments are optional key-value pairs as follows:

-profile is a path to a configuration file. If $FILE is not defined, Perl::Critic::Config attempts to find a .perlcriticrc configuration file in the current directory, and then in your home directory. Alternatively, you can set the PERLCRITIC environment variable to point to a file in another location. If a configuration file can't be found, or if $FILE is an empty string, then all Policies will be loaded with their default configuration. See "CONFIGURATION" for more information.

-severity is the minimum severity level. Only Policy modules that have a severity greater than $N will be applied. Severity values are integers ranging from 1 (least severe violations) to 5 (most severe violations). The default is 5. For a given -profile, decreasing the -severity will usually reveal more Policy violations. You can set the default value for this option in your .perlcriticrc file. Users can redefine the severity level for any Policy in their .perlcriticrc file. See "CONFIGURATION" for more information.

If it is difficult for you to remember whether severity "5" is the most or least restrictive level, then you can use one of these named values:

  SEVERITY NAME   ...is equivalent to...   SEVERITY NUMBER
  --------------------------------------------------------
  -severity => 'gentle'                     -severity => 5
  -severity => 'stern'                      -severity => 4
  -severity => 'harsh'                      -severity => 3
  -severity => 'cruel'                      -severity => 2
  -severity => 'brutal'                     -severity => 1

The names reflect how severely the code is criticized: a gentle criticism reports only the most severe violations, and so on down to a brutal criticism which reports even the most minor violations.

-theme is special expression that determines which Policies to apply based on their respective themes. For example, the following would load only Policies that have a 'bugs' AND 'pbp' theme:

  my $critic = Perl::Critic->new( -theme => 'bugs && pbp' );

Unless the -severity option is explicitly given, setting -theme silently causes the -severity to be set to 1. You can set the default value for this option in your .perlcriticrc file. See the "POLICY THEMES" section for more information about themes.

-include is a reference to a list of string @PATTERNS. Policy modules that match at least one m/$PATTERN/ixms will always be loaded, irrespective of all other settings. For example:

  my $critic = Perl::Critic->new(-include => ['layout'], -severity => 4);

This would cause Perl::Critic to apply all the CodeLayout::* Policy modules even though they have a severity level that is less than 4. You can set the default value for this option in your .perlcriticrc file. You can also use -include in conjunction with the -exclude option. Note that -exclude takes precedence over -include when a Policy matches both patterns.

-exclude is a reference to a list of string @PATTERNS. Policy modules that match at least one m/$PATTERN/ixms will not be loaded, irrespective of all other settings. For example:

  my $critic = Perl::Critic->new(-exclude => ['strict'], -severity => 1);

This would cause Perl::Critic to not apply the RequireUseStrict and ProhibitNoStrict Policy modules even though they have a severity level that is greater than 1. You can set the default value for this option in your .perlcriticrc file. You can also use -exclude in conjunction with the -include option. Note that -exclude takes precedence over -include when a Policy matches both patterns.

-single-policy is a string PATTERN. Only one policy that matches m/$PATTERN/ixms will be used. Policies that do not match will be excluded. This option has precedence over the -severity, -theme, -include, -exclude, and -only options. You can set the default value for this option in your .perlcriticrc file.

-top is the maximum number of Violations to return when ranked by their severity levels. This must be a positive integer. Violations are still returned in the order that they occur within the file. Unless the -severity option is explicitly given, setting -top silently causes the -severity to be set to 1. You can set the default value for this option in your .perlcriticrc file.

-only is a boolean value. If set to a true value, Perl::Critic will only choose from Policies that are mentioned in the user's profile. If set to a false value (which is the default), then Perl::Critic chooses from all the Policies that it finds at your site. You can set the default value for this option in your .perlcriticrc file.

-profile-strictness is an enumerated value, one of "$PROFILE_STRICTNESS_WARN" in Perl::Critic::Utils::Constants (the default), "$PROFILE_STRICTNESS_FATAL" in Perl::Critic::Utils::Constants, and "$PROFILE_STRICTNESS_QUIET" in Perl::Critic::Utils::Constants. If set to "$PROFILE_STRICTNESS_FATAL" in Perl::Critic::Utils::Constants, Perl::Critic will make certain warnings about problems found in a .perlcriticrc or file specified via the -profile option fatal. For example, Perl::Critic normally only warns about profiles referring to non-existent Policies, but this value makes this situation fatal. Correspondingly, "$PROFILE_STRICTNESS_QUIET" in Perl::Critic::Utils::Constants makes Perl::Critic shut up about these things.

-force is a boolean value that controls whether Perl::Critic observes the magical "## no critic" annotations in your code. If set to a true value, Perl::Critic will analyze all code. If set to a false value (which is the default) Perl::Critic will ignore code that is tagged with these annotations. See "BENDING THE RULES" for more information. You can set the default value for this option in your .perlcriticrc file.

-verbose can be a positive integer (from 1 to 11), or a literal format specification. See Perl::Critic::Violation for an explanation of format specifications. You can set the default value for this option in your .perlcriticrc file.

-unsafe directs Perl::Critic to allow the use of Policies that are marked as "unsafe" by the author. Such policies may compile untrusted code or do other nefarious things.

-color and -pager are not used by Perl::Critic but is provided for the benefit of perlcritic.

-criticism-fatal is not used by Perl::Critic but is provided for the benefit of criticism.

-color-severity-highest, -color-severity-high, -color-severity- medium, -color-severity-low, and -color-severity-lowest are not used by Perl::Critic, but are provided for the benefit of perlcritic. Each is set to the Term::ANSIColor color specification to be used to display violations of the corresponding severity.

-files-with-violations and -files-without-violations are not used by Perl::Critic, but are provided for the benefit of perlcritic, to cause only the relevant filenames to be displayed.

METHODS

critique( $source_code )

Runs the $source_code through the Perl::Critic engine using all the Policies that have been loaded into this engine. If $source_code is a scalar reference, then it is treated as a string of actual Perl code. If $source_code is a reference to an instance of PPI::Document, then that instance is used directly. Otherwise, it is treated as a path to a local file containing Perl code. This method returns a list of Perl::Critic::Violation objects for each violation of the loaded Policies. The list is sorted in the order that the Violations appear in the code. If there are no violations, this method returns an empty list.

add_policy( -policy => $policy_name, -params => \%param_hash )

Creates a Policy object and loads it into this Critic. If the object cannot be instantiated, it will throw a fatal exception. Otherwise, it returns a reference to this Critic.

-policy is the name of a Perl::Critic::Policy subclass module. The 'Perl::Critic::Policy' portion of the name can be omitted for brevity. This argument is required.

-params is an optional reference to a hash of Policy parameters. The contents of this hash reference will be passed into to the constructor of the Policy module. See the documentation in the relevant Policy module for a description of the arguments it supports.

policies()

Returns a list containing references to all the Policy objects that have been loaded into this engine. Objects will be in the order that they were loaded.

config()

Returns the Perl::Critic::Config object that was created for or given to this Critic.

statistics()

Returns the Perl::Critic::Statistics object that was created for this Critic. The Statistics object accumulates data for all files that are analyzed by this Critic.

FUNCTIONAL INTERFACE

For those folks who prefer to have a functional interface, The critique method can be exported on request and called as a static function. If the first argument is a hashref, its contents are used to construct a new Perl::Critic object internally. The keys of that hash should be the same as those supported by the Perl::Critic::new() method. Here are some examples:

use Perl::Critic qw(critique);

# Use default parameters...
@violations = critique( $some_file );

# Use custom parameters...
@violations = critique( {-severity => 2}, $some_file );

# As a one-liner
%> perl -MPerl::Critic=critique -e 'print critique(shift)' some_file.pm

None of the other object-methods are currently supported as static functions. Sorry.

CONFIGURATION

Most of the settings for Perl::Critic and each of the Policy modules can be controlled by a configuration file. The default configuration file is called .perlcriticrc. Perl::Critic will look for this file in the current directory first, and then in your home directory. Alternatively, you can set the PERLCRITIC environment variable to explicitly point to a different file in another location. If none of these files exist, and the -profile option is not given to the constructor, then all the modules that are found in the Perl::Critic::Policy namespace will be loaded with their default configuration.

The format of the configuration file is a series of INI-style blocks that contain key-value pairs separated by '='. Comments should start with '#' and can be placed on a separate line or after the name-value pairs if you desire.

Default settings for Perl::Critic itself can be set before the first named block. For example, putting any or all of these at the top of your configuration file will set the default value for the corresponding constructor argument.

severity  = 3                                     #Integer or named level
only      = 1                                     #Zero or One
force     = 0                                     #Zero or One
verbose   = 4                                     #Integer or format spec
top       = 50                                    #A positive integer
theme     = (pbp || security) && bugs             #A theme expression
include   = NamingConventions ClassHierarchies    #Space-delimited list
exclude   = Variables  Modules::RequirePackage    #Space-delimited list
criticism-fatal = 1                               #Zero or One
color     = 1                                     #Zero or One
allow-unsafe = 1                                  #Zero or One
pager     = less                                  #pager to pipe output to

The remainder of the configuration file is a series of blocks like this:

[Perl::Critic::Policy::Category::PolicyName]
severity = 1
set_themes = foo bar
add_themes = baz
maximum_violations_per_document = 57
arg1 = value1
arg2 = value2

Perl::Critic::Policy::Category::PolicyName is the full name of a module that implements the policy. The Policy modules distributed with Perl::Critic have been grouped into categories according to the table of contents in Damian Conway's book Perl Best Practices. For brevity, you can omit the 'Perl::Critic::Policy' part of the module name.

severity is the level of importance you wish to assign to the Policy. All Policy modules are defined with a default severity value ranging from 1 (least severe) to 5 (most severe). However, you may disagree with the default severity and choose to give it a higher or lower severity, based on your own coding philosophy. You can set the severity to an integer from 1 to 5, or use one of the equivalent names:

SEVERITY NAME ...is equivalent to... SEVERITY NUMBER
----------------------------------------------------
gentle                                             5
stern                                              4
harsh                                              3
cruel                                              2
brutal                                             1

The names reflect how severely the code is criticized: a gentle criticism reports only the most severe violations, and so on down to a brutal criticism which reports even the most minor violations.

set_themes sets the theme for the Policy and overrides its default theme. The argument is a string of one or more whitespace-delimited alphanumeric words. Themes are case-insensitive. See "POLICY THEMES" for more information.

add_themes appends to the default themes for this Policy. The argument is a string of one or more whitespace-delimited words. Themes are case- insensitive. See "POLICY THEMES" for more information.

maximum_violations_per_document limits the number of Violations the Policy will return for a given document. Some Policies have a default limit; see the documentation for the individual Policies to see whether there is one. To force a Policy to not have a limit, specify "no_limit" or the empty string for the value of this parameter.

The remaining key-value pairs are configuration parameters that will be passed into the constructor for that Policy. The constructors for most Policy objects do not support arguments, and those that do should have reasonable defaults. See the documentation on the appropriate Policy module for more details.

Instead of redefining the severity for a given Policy, you can completely disable a Policy by prepending a '-' to the name of the module in your configuration file. In this manner, the Policy will never be loaded, regardless of the -severity given to the Perl::Critic constructor.

A simple configuration might look like this:

#--------------------------------------------------------------
# I think these are really important, so always load them

[TestingAndDebugging::RequireUseStrict]
severity = 5

[TestingAndDebugging::RequireUseWarnings]
severity = 5

#--------------------------------------------------------------
# I think these are less important, so only load when asked

[Variables::ProhibitPackageVars]
severity = 2

[ControlStructures::ProhibitPostfixControls]
allow = if unless  # My custom configuration
severity = cruel   # Same as "severity = 2"

#--------------------------------------------------------------
# Give these policies a custom theme.  I can activate just
# these policies by saying `perlcritic -theme larry`

[Modules::RequireFilenameMatchesPackage]
add_themes = larry

[TestingAndDebugging::RequireTestLables]
add_themes = larry curly moe

#--------------------------------------------------------------
# I do not agree with these at all, so never load them

[-NamingConventions::Capitalization]
[-ValuesAndExpressions::ProhibitMagicNumbers]

#--------------------------------------------------------------
# For all other Policies, I accept the default severity,
# so no additional configuration is required for them.

For additional configuration examples, see the perlcriticrc file that is included in this examples directory of this distribution.

Damian Conway's own Perl::Critic configuration is also included in this distribution as examples/perlcriticrc-conway.

THE POLICIES

A large number of Policy modules are distributed with Perl::Critic. They are described briefly in the companion document Perl::Critic::PolicySummary and in more detail in the individual modules themselves. Say "perlcritic -doc PATTERN" to see the perldoc for all Policy modules that match the regex m/PATTERN/ixms

There are a number of distributions of additional policies on CPAN. If Perl::Critic doesn't contain a policy that you want, some one may have already written it. See the "SEE ALSO" section below for a list of some of these distributions.

POLICY THEMES

Each Policy is defined with one or more "themes". Themes can be used to create arbitrary groups of Policies. They are intended to provide an alternative mechanism for selecting your preferred set of Policies. For example, you may wish disable a certain subset of Policies when analyzing test programs. Conversely, you may wish to enable only a specific subset of Policies when analyzing modules.

The Policies that ship with Perl::Critic have been broken into the following themes. This is just our attempt to provide some basic logical groupings. You are free to invent new themes that suit your needs.

THEME             DESCRIPTION
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
core              All policies that ship with Perl::Critic
pbp               Policies that come directly from "Perl Best Practices"
bugs              Policies that that prevent or reveal bugs
certrec           Policies that CERT recommends
certrule          Policies that CERT considers rules
maintenance       Policies that affect the long-term health of the code
cosmetic          Policies that only have a superficial effect
complexity        Policies that specifically relate to code complexity
security          Policies that relate to security issues
tests             Policies that are specific to test programs

Any Policy may fit into multiple themes. Say "perlcritic -list" to get a listing of all available Policies and the themes that are associated with each one. You can also change the theme for any Policy in your .perlcriticrc file. See the "CONFIGURATION" section for more information about that.

Using the -theme option, you can create an arbitrarily complex rule that determines which Policies will be loaded. Precedence is the same as regular Perl code, and you can use parentheses to enforce precedence as well. Supported operators are:

Operator    Alternative    Example
-----------------------------------------------------------------
&&          and            'pbp && core'
||          or             'pbp || (bugs && security)'
!           not            'pbp && ! (portability || complexity)'

Theme names are case-insensitive. If the -theme is set to an empty string, then it evaluates as true all Policies.

BENDING THE RULES

Perl::Critic takes a hard-line approach to your code: either you comply or you don't. In the real world, it is not always practical (nor even possible) to fully comply with coding standards. In such cases, it is wise to show that you are knowingly violating the standards and that you have a Damn Good Reason (DGR) for doing so.

To help with those situations, you can direct Perl::Critic to ignore certain lines or blocks of code by using annotations:

require 'LegacyLibaray1.pl';  ## no critic
require 'LegacyLibrary2.pl';  ## no critic

for my $element (@list) {

    ## no critic

    $foo = "";               #Violates 'ProhibitEmptyQuotes'
    $barf = bar() if $foo;   #Violates 'ProhibitPostfixControls'
    #Some more evil code...

    ## use critic

    #Some good code...
    do_something($_);
}

The "## no critic" annotations direct Perl::Critic to ignore the remaining lines of code until a "## use critic" annotation is found. If the "## no critic" annotation is on the same line as a code statement, then only that line of code is overlooked. To direct perlcritic to ignore the "## no critic" annotations, use the --force option.

A bare "## no critic" annotation disables all the active Policies. If you wish to disable only specific Policies, add a list of Policy names as arguments, just as you would for the "no strict" or "no warnings" pragmas. For example, this would disable the ProhibitEmptyQuotes and ProhibitPostfixControls policies until the end of the block or until the next "## use critic" annotation (whichever comes first):

## no critic (EmptyQuotes, PostfixControls)

# Now exempt from ValuesAndExpressions::ProhibitEmptyQuotes
$foo = "";

# Now exempt ControlStructures::ProhibitPostfixControls
$barf = bar() if $foo;

# Still subjected to ValuesAndExpression::RequireNumberSeparators
$long_int = 10000000000;

Since the Policy names are matched against the "## no critic" arguments as regular expressions, you can abbreviate the Policy names or disable an entire family of Policies in one shot like this:

## no critic (NamingConventions)

# Now exempt from NamingConventions::Capitalization
my $camelHumpVar = 'foo';

# Now exempt from NamingConventions::Capitalization
sub camelHumpSub {}

The argument list must be enclosed in parentheses or brackets and must contain one or more comma-separated barewords (e.g. don't use quotes). The "## no critic" annotations can be nested, and Policies named by an inner annotation will be disabled along with those already disabled an outer annotation.

Some Policies like Subroutines::ProhibitExcessComplexity apply to an entire block of code. In those cases, the "## no critic" annotation must appear on the line where the violation is reported. For example:

sub complicated_function {  ## no critic (ProhibitExcessComplexity)
    # Your code here...
}

Policies such as Documentation::RequirePodSections apply to the entire document, in which case violations are reported at line 1.

Use this feature wisely. "## no critic" annotations should be used in the smallest possible scope, or only on individual lines of code. And you should always be as specific as possible about which Policies you want to disable (i.e. never use a bare "## no critic"). If Perl::Critic complains about your code, try and find a compliant solution before resorting to this feature.

THE Perl::Critic PHILOSOPHY

Coding standards are deeply personal and highly subjective. The goal of Perl::Critic is to help you write code that conforms with a set of best practices. Our primary goal is not to dictate what those practices are, but rather, to implement the practices discovered by others. Ultimately, you make the rules -- Perl::Critic is merely a tool for encouraging consistency. If there is a policy that you think is important or that we have overlooked, we would be very grateful for contributions, or you can simply load your own private set of policies into Perl::Critic.

EXTENDING THE CRITIC

The modular design of Perl::Critic is intended to facilitate the addition of new Policies. You'll need to have some understanding of PPI, but most Policy modules are pretty straightforward and only require about 20 lines of code. Please see the Perl::Critic::DEVELOPER file included in this distribution for a step-by-step demonstration of how to create new Policy modules.

If you develop any new Policy modules, feel free to send them to <team@perlcritic.com> and I'll be happy to consider putting them into the Perl::Critic distribution. Or if you would like to work on the Perl::Critic project directly, you can fork our repository at https://github.com/Perl-Critic/Perl-Critic.git.

The Perl::Critic team is also available for hire. If your organization has its own coding standards, we can create custom Policies to enforce your local guidelines. Or if your code base is prone to a particular defect pattern, we can design Policies that will help you catch those costly defects before they go into production. To discuss your needs with the Perl::Critic team, just contact <team@perlcritic.com>.

PREREQUISITES

Perl::Critic requires the following modules:

B::Keywords

Config::Tiny

Exception::Class

File::Spec

File::Spec::Unix

File::Which

IO::String

List::SomeUtils

List::Util

Module::Pluggable

Perl::Tidy

Pod::Spell

PPI

Pod::PlainText

Pod::Select

Pod::Usage

Readonly

Scalar::Util

String::Format

Task::Weaken

Term::ANSIColor

Text::ParseWords

version

CONTACTING THE DEVELOPMENT TEAM

You are encouraged to subscribe to the public mailing list at https://groups.google.com/d/forum/perl-critic. At least one member of the development team is usually hanging around in irc://irc.perl.org/#perlcritic and you can follow Perl::Critic on Twitter, at https://twitter.com/perlcritic.

SEE ALSO

There are a number of distributions of additional Policies available. A few are listed here:

Perl::Critic::More

Perl::Critic::Bangs

Perl::Critic::Lax

Perl::Critic::StricterSubs

Perl::Critic::Swift

Perl::Critic::Tics

These distributions enable you to use Perl::Critic in your unit tests:

Test::Perl::Critic

Test::Perl::Critic::Progressive

There is also a distribution that will install all the Perl::Critic related modules known to the development team:

Task::Perl::Critic

BUGS

Scrutinizing Perl code is hard for humans, let alone machines. If you find any bugs, particularly false-positives or false-negatives from a Perl::Critic::Policy, please submit them at https://github.com/Perl-Critic/Perl-Critic/issues. Thanks.

CREDITS

Adam Kennedy - For creating PPI, the heart and soul of Perl::Critic.

Damian Conway - For writing Perl Best Practices, finally :)

Chris Dolan - For contributing the best features and Policy modules.

Andy Lester - Wise sage and master of all-things-testing.

Elliot Shank - The self-proclaimed quality freak.

Giuseppe Maxia - For all the great ideas and positive encouragement.

and Sharon, my wife - For putting up with my all-night code sessions.

Thanks also to the Perl Foundation for providing a grant to support Chris Dolan's project to implement twenty PBP policies. http://www.perlfoundation.org/april_1_2007_new_grant_awards

Thanks also to this incomplete laundry list of folks who have contributed to Perl::Critic in some way: Gregory Oschwald, Mike O'Regan, Tom Hukins, Omer Gazit, Evan Zacks, Paul Howarth, Sawyer X, Christian Walde, Dave Rolsky, Jakub Wilk, Roy Ivy III, Oliver Trosien, Glenn Fowler, Matt Creenan, Alex Balhatchet, Sebastian Paaske Tørholm, Stuart A Johnston, Dan Book, Steven Humphrey, James Raspass, Nick Tonkin, Harrison Katz, Douglas Sims, Mark Fowler, Alan Berndt, Neil Bowers, Sergey Romanov, Gabor Szabo, Graham Knop, Mike Eldridge, David Steinbrunner, Kirk Kimmel, Guillaume Aubert, Dave Cross, Anirvan Chatterjee, Todd Rinaldo, Graham Ollis, Karen Etheridge, Jonas Brømsø, Olaf Alders, Jim Keenan, Slaven Rezić, Szymon Nieznański.

AUTHOR

Jeffrey Ryan Thalhammer jeff@imaginative-software.com

COPYRIGHT

Copyright (c) 2005-2018 Imaginative Software Systems. All rights reserved.

This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as Perl itself. The full text of this license can be found in the LICENSE file included with this module.


Download Details:

Author: Perl-Critic
Source Code: https://github.com/Perl-Critic/Perl-Critic

License: View license

#perl 

Security  IT

Security IT

1606927174

10 Cyber Security Tools to Watch Out for in 2021 - DZone Security

With an immense number of companies and entities climbing onto the digital bandwagon, cybersecurity considerations have come up as limelight. Besides, new technologies such as Big Data, IoT, and Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning are gradually more making inroads into our everyday lives, the threats related to cybercrime are mounting as well. Additionally, the usage of mobile and web apps in transacting financial information has put the complete digital stuff exposed to cybersecurity breaches. The inherent risks and vulnerabilities found in such apps can be exploited by attackers or cybercriminals to draw off crucial information data counting money. Internationally, cyber-security breaches have caused a yearly loss of USD 20.38 million in 2019 (Source: Statista). Plus, cybercrime has led to a 0.80 percent loss of the entire world’s Gross domestic product, which sums up to approx. USD 2.1 trillion in the year 2019 alone (Source: Cybriant.com).

In this article, take a look at ten cyber security tools to watch out for in 2021, including NMap, Wireshark, Metasploit, and more!

#security #cyber security #security testing #security testing tools #cyber security tools

Humberto  Ratke

Humberto Ratke

1589921100

Zero-Trust Security and DevOps

As someone who works in the finance industry, information security is obviously of top concern when it comes to any software project. Too often though security concerns bubble up too late in the software development lifecycle and cause huge issues near the end of a project. Part of the “DevSecOps” model means getting information security more involved earlier in the design phase of an application so that security concerns can be addressed sooner.

#zero-trust-security #devsecops #information-security #devops

Ida  Nader

Ida Nader

1593209400

Apple Jailbreak Zero-Day Gets a Patch

The zero-day vulnerability tracked as CVE-2020-9859 is exploited by the “Uncover” jailbreak tool released last week.

Apple quietly pushed out a small but important update for operating systems across all of its devices, including a patch for a zero-day exploit used in an iPhone jailbreak toolreleased last week.

In its notes for the release, Apple says very little else about the patches overall that it pushed out Monday — for iOS (including 13.4.6 for HomePod) and iPadOS 13.5.1, watchOS 6.2.6, tvOS 13.4.6, and macOS 10.15.5 — other than that they provide “important security updates” that are “recommended for all users.”

A further look at the details of the iPhone updates explains that the release addresses the bug tracked as CVE-2020-9859, used in the Unc0ver jailbreak. The impact of the vulnerability is that “an application may be able to execute arbitrary code with kernel privileges.” The description of the fix is that “a memory-consumption issue was addressed with improved memory handling.”

The update comes less than a week after hackers released the Unc0ver jailbreak tool, which they said uses a zero-day exploit to break into any iPhone, even those running the latest iOS 13.5. the hackers did not disclose which unpatched iOS flaw they use in their new tool, but they lauded it as the first zero-day jailbreak for the iPhone platform since iOS 8. Jailbreak tools take advantage of vulnerabilities in iOS to allow users root access and full control of their device, in order to load programs and code from outside of the Apple walled garden.

However, one report from Vice Motherboard last week said that the jailbreak takes advantage of a kernel vulnerability, which was subsequently identified as CVE-2020-9859.

The team behind jailbreak tool said at the time that they expected Apple to find the flaw and release a patch for it, calling it the “nature” of the business, a hacker called Pwn20wndtold Vice Motherboard.

The ability for a threat actor to execute arbitrary code with kernel privileges is indeed a critical security problem that Apple would want to patch as soon as possible once it’s been discovered or exploited. Kernel privileges gives someone control over everything in the OS, so a hacker who uses this ability can basically take over, modify or access whatever data or functionality they choose to on someone’s iOS device.

Some pro-jailbreak Apple users on Twitter are encouraging users to skip the security update.

#mobile security #vulnerabilities #apple #cve-2020-9859 #hackers #ios #ipad #ipados #iphone #jailbreak #kernel #macos #operating system #patch #pwn20wnd #security #security update #security vulnerability #twitter #unc0ver #zero-day