Brad  Braun

Brad Braun

1620654660

Create a Contact Form with React and JavaScript

React is an easy-to-use JavaScript framework that lets us create front-end apps.

In this article, we’ll look at how to create a contact form with React and JavaScript.

Create the Project

We can create the React project with Create React App.

To install it, we run…

npx create-react-app contact-form

…with NPM to create our React project.

#javascript

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Create a Contact Form with React and JavaScript
Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1598839687

How native is React Native? | React Native vs Native App Development

If you are undertaking a mobile app development for your start-up or enterprise, you are likely wondering whether to use React Native. As a popular development framework, React Native helps you to develop near-native mobile apps. However, you are probably also wondering how close you can get to a native app by using React Native. How native is React Native?

In the article, we discuss the similarities between native mobile development and development using React Native. We also touch upon where they differ and how to bridge the gaps. Read on.

A brief introduction to React Native

Let’s briefly set the context first. We will briefly touch upon what React Native is and how it differs from earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is a popular JavaScript framework that Facebook has created. You can use this open-source framework to code natively rendering Android and iOS mobile apps. You can use it to develop web apps too.

Facebook has developed React Native based on React, its JavaScript library. The first release of React Native came in March 2015. At the time of writing this article, the latest stable release of React Native is 0.62.0, and it was released in March 2020.

Although relatively new, React Native has acquired a high degree of popularity. The “Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2019” report identifies it as the 8th most loved framework. Facebook, Walmart, and Bloomberg are some of the top companies that use React Native.

The popularity of React Native comes from its advantages. Some of its advantages are as follows:

  • Performance: It delivers optimal performance.
  • Cross-platform development: You can develop both Android and iOS apps with it. The reuse of code expedites development and reduces costs.
  • UI design: React Native enables you to design simple and responsive UI for your mobile app.
  • 3rd party plugins: This framework supports 3rd party plugins.
  • Developer community: A vibrant community of developers support React Native.

Why React Native is fundamentally different from earlier hybrid frameworks

Are you wondering whether React Native is just another of those hybrid frameworks like Ionic or Cordova? It’s not! React Native is fundamentally different from these earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is very close to native. Consider the following aspects as described on the React Native website:

  • Access to many native platforms features: The primitives of React Native render to native platform UI. This means that your React Native app will use many native platform APIs as native apps would do.
  • Near-native user experience: React Native provides several native components, and these are platform agnostic.
  • The ease of accessing native APIs: React Native uses a declarative UI paradigm. This enables React Native to interact easily with native platform APIs since React Native wraps existing native code.

Due to these factors, React Native offers many more advantages compared to those earlier hybrid frameworks. We now review them.

#android app #frontend #ios app #mobile app development #benefits of react native #is react native good for mobile app development #native vs #pros and cons of react native #react mobile development #react native development #react native experience #react native framework #react native ios vs android #react native pros and cons #react native vs android #react native vs native #react native vs native performance #react vs native #why react native #why use react native

Easter  Deckow

Easter Deckow

1655630160

PyTumblr: A Python Tumblr API v2 Client

PyTumblr

Installation

Install via pip:

$ pip install pytumblr

Install from source:

$ git clone https://github.com/tumblr/pytumblr.git
$ cd pytumblr
$ python setup.py install

Usage

Create a client

A pytumblr.TumblrRestClient is the object you'll make all of your calls to the Tumblr API through. Creating one is this easy:

client = pytumblr.TumblrRestClient(
    '<consumer_key>',
    '<consumer_secret>',
    '<oauth_token>',
    '<oauth_secret>',
)

client.info() # Grabs the current user information

Two easy ways to get your credentials to are:

  1. The built-in interactive_console.py tool (if you already have a consumer key & secret)
  2. The Tumblr API console at https://api.tumblr.com/console
  3. Get sample login code at https://api.tumblr.com/console/calls/user/info

Supported Methods

User Methods

client.info() # get information about the authenticating user
client.dashboard() # get the dashboard for the authenticating user
client.likes() # get the likes for the authenticating user
client.following() # get the blogs followed by the authenticating user

client.follow('codingjester.tumblr.com') # follow a blog
client.unfollow('codingjester.tumblr.com') # unfollow a blog

client.like(id, reblogkey) # like a post
client.unlike(id, reblogkey) # unlike a post

Blog Methods

client.blog_info(blogName) # get information about a blog
client.posts(blogName, **params) # get posts for a blog
client.avatar(blogName) # get the avatar for a blog
client.blog_likes(blogName) # get the likes on a blog
client.followers(blogName) # get the followers of a blog
client.blog_following(blogName) # get the publicly exposed blogs that [blogName] follows
client.queue(blogName) # get the queue for a given blog
client.submission(blogName) # get the submissions for a given blog

Post Methods

Creating posts

PyTumblr lets you create all of the various types that Tumblr supports. When using these types there are a few defaults that are able to be used with any post type.

The default supported types are described below.

  • state - a string, the state of the post. Supported types are published, draft, queue, private
  • tags - a list, a list of strings that you want tagged on the post. eg: ["testing", "magic", "1"]
  • tweet - a string, the string of the customized tweet you want. eg: "Man I love my mega awesome post!"
  • date - a string, the customized GMT that you want
  • format - a string, the format that your post is in. Support types are html or markdown
  • slug - a string, the slug for the url of the post you want

We'll show examples throughout of these default examples while showcasing all the specific post types.

Creating a photo post

Creating a photo post supports a bunch of different options plus the described default options * caption - a string, the user supplied caption * link - a string, the "click-through" url for the photo * source - a string, the url for the photo you want to use (use this or the data parameter) * data - a list or string, a list of filepaths or a single file path for multipart file upload

#Creates a photo post using a source URL
client.create_photo(blogName, state="published", tags=["testing", "ok"],
                    source="https://68.media.tumblr.com/b965fbb2e501610a29d80ffb6fb3e1ad/tumblr_n55vdeTse11rn1906o1_500.jpg")

#Creates a photo post using a local filepath
client.create_photo(blogName, state="queue", tags=["testing", "ok"],
                    tweet="Woah this is an incredible sweet post [URL]",
                    data="/Users/johnb/path/to/my/image.jpg")

#Creates a photoset post using several local filepaths
client.create_photo(blogName, state="draft", tags=["jb is cool"], format="markdown",
                    data=["/Users/johnb/path/to/my/image.jpg", "/Users/johnb/Pictures/kittens.jpg"],
                    caption="## Mega sweet kittens")

Creating a text post

Creating a text post supports the same options as default and just a two other parameters * title - a string, the optional title for the post. Supports markdown or html * body - a string, the body of the of the post. Supports markdown or html

#Creating a text post
client.create_text(blogName, state="published", slug="testing-text-posts", title="Testing", body="testing1 2 3 4")

Creating a quote post

Creating a quote post supports the same options as default and two other parameter * quote - a string, the full text of the qote. Supports markdown or html * source - a string, the cited source. HTML supported

#Creating a quote post
client.create_quote(blogName, state="queue", quote="I am the Walrus", source="Ringo")

Creating a link post

  • title - a string, the title of post that you want. Supports HTML entities.
  • url - a string, the url that you want to create a link post for.
  • description - a string, the desciption of the link that you have
#Create a link post
client.create_link(blogName, title="I like to search things, you should too.", url="https://duckduckgo.com",
                   description="Search is pretty cool when a duck does it.")

Creating a chat post

Creating a chat post supports the same options as default and two other parameters * title - a string, the title of the chat post * conversation - a string, the text of the conversation/chat, with diablog labels (no html)

#Create a chat post
chat = """John: Testing can be fun!
Renee: Testing is tedious and so are you.
John: Aw.
"""
client.create_chat(blogName, title="Renee just doesn't understand.", conversation=chat, tags=["renee", "testing"])

Creating an audio post

Creating an audio post allows for all default options and a has 3 other parameters. The only thing to keep in mind while dealing with audio posts is to make sure that you use the external_url parameter or data. You cannot use both at the same time. * caption - a string, the caption for your post * external_url - a string, the url of the site that hosts the audio file * data - a string, the filepath of the audio file you want to upload to Tumblr

#Creating an audio file
client.create_audio(blogName, caption="Rock out.", data="/Users/johnb/Music/my/new/sweet/album.mp3")

#lets use soundcloud!
client.create_audio(blogName, caption="Mega rock out.", external_url="https://soundcloud.com/skrillex/sets/recess")

Creating a video post

Creating a video post allows for all default options and has three other options. Like the other post types, it has some restrictions. You cannot use the embed and data parameters at the same time. * caption - a string, the caption for your post * embed - a string, the HTML embed code for the video * data - a string, the path of the file you want to upload

#Creating an upload from YouTube
client.create_video(blogName, caption="Jon Snow. Mega ridiculous sword.",
                    embed="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=40pUYLacrj4")

#Creating a video post from local file
client.create_video(blogName, caption="testing", data="/Users/johnb/testing/ok/blah.mov")

Editing a post

Updating a post requires you knowing what type a post you're updating. You'll be able to supply to the post any of the options given above for updates.

client.edit_post(blogName, id=post_id, type="text", title="Updated")
client.edit_post(blogName, id=post_id, type="photo", data="/Users/johnb/mega/awesome.jpg")

Reblogging a Post

Reblogging a post just requires knowing the post id and the reblog key, which is supplied in the JSON of any post object.

client.reblog(blogName, id=125356, reblog_key="reblog_key")

Deleting a post

Deleting just requires that you own the post and have the post id

client.delete_post(blogName, 123456) # Deletes your post :(

A note on tags: When passing tags, as params, please pass them as a list (not a comma-separated string):

client.create_text(blogName, tags=['hello', 'world'], ...)

Getting notes for a post

In order to get the notes for a post, you need to have the post id and the blog that it is on.

data = client.notes(blogName, id='123456')

The results include a timestamp you can use to make future calls.

data = client.notes(blogName, id='123456', before_timestamp=data["_links"]["next"]["query_params"]["before_timestamp"])

Tagged Methods

# get posts with a given tag
client.tagged(tag, **params)

Using the interactive console

This client comes with a nice interactive console to run you through the OAuth process, grab your tokens (and store them for future use).

You'll need pyyaml installed to run it, but then it's just:

$ python interactive-console.py

and away you go! Tokens are stored in ~/.tumblr and are also shared by other Tumblr API clients like the Ruby client.

Running tests

The tests (and coverage reports) are run with nose, like this:

python setup.py test

Author: tumblr
Source Code: https://github.com/tumblr/pytumblr
License: Apache-2.0 license

#python #api 

Seamus  Quitzon

Seamus Quitzon

1598954760

Build a Contact Form with React Hooks and PHP

A while ago I wrote an article about creating a contact form using React and PHP. Many people found it interesting. So, here I am writing an updated version of that article.

Check out the article about creating a contact form with React and PHP:

Hooks are a new addition in React and we are going to re-create the contact form using React Hooks.

Prerequisites? Not really!

Same as the previous project. This tutorial is beginners friendly. You don’t have to be an expert in Javascript, React, or PHP but I won’t go into basic details like installing React and setting up the project.

I assume you already have an up and running React project. We will focus on creating the component.

Creating the component

If you have a component folder in your project please go ahead and create a ‘Form’ folder inside it. It is up to you to decide where the component should live. Once you created the folder let’s create the ‘index.js’ file.

#react #reactphp #react-php-contac-form #contact-form #react-hook

How to Create a Client-Side Form Validation using JavaScript

In this video, we will create a client-side form validation using JavaScript. I'll only use Vanilla JavaScript and no external 3rd party dependencies. The aim is to help beginners to do form validation and understand how the whole process works.

Timestamps:
00:00 Intro
00:26 HTML
03:33 CSS
05:35 Javascript

Source code: https://codepen.io/javascriptacademy-stash/pen/oNeNMNR


 HTML

Let's start with the HTML markup. We'll have a container div, that we'll use to position and style our form. Inside that, not surprisingly, we'll create a form, we also set an id for it, and set the action to / since we don't really want to submit this form.

We'll create four input fields, for the username, email, password, and password confirmation. For styling and control purposes we'll wrap these input tags into divs with the class input control. Each of these input controls will contain a label, an input, and a div with the class error. Every input should have an id and name attribute. The label's should have a matching for property with the corresponding input tag's name attribute. For the input type we will use text for the username and email, and use password for the password and the password confirmation. The div with the error class will hold the error messages for the specific input field. It will be empty for now, we will modify it from javascript.

Lastly, we have to add a button to "submit" our form. In this example we won't really submit the form just simulate it. For the submit button I'll use a button with a type of submit.

<div class="container">
        <form id="form" action="/">
            <h1>Registration</h1>
            <div class="input-control">
                <label for="username">Username</label>
                <input id="username" name="username" type="text">
                <div class="error"></div>
            </div>
            <div class="input-control">
                <label for="email">Email</label>
                <input id="email" name="email" type="text">
                <div class="error"></div>
            </div>
            <div class="input-control">
                <label for="password">Password</label>
                <input id="password"name="password" type="password">
                <div class="error"></div>
            </div>
            <div class="input-control">
                <label for="password2">Password again</label>
                <input id="password2"name="password2" type="password">
                <div class="error"></div>
            </div>
            <button type="submit">Sign Up</button>
        </form>
    </div>

That is the HTML markup that we need for our form. Let's style it a bit with CSS.

CSS

We'll give a simple clean spacious design for this tutorial. I'll set a linear gradient as the background and I'll use a custom google font, that you can install from here.

body {
    background: linear-gradient(to right, #0f2027, #203a43, #2c5364);
    font-family: 'Poppins', sans-serif;
}

We'll give a fix width to our form, and center it with margins, also I'll give it a top margin to move it down a bit vertically. To have more space we apply 20px of padding. We'll set a fixed font size, a light background color and also set a border radius to have rounded corners.

#form {
    width: 300px;
    margin: 20vh auto 0 auto;
    padding: 20px;
    background-color: whitesmoke;
    border-radius: 4px;
    font-size: 12px;
}

For the form title, we'll use a dark text color, and center it horizontally using text-align: center. The submit button should stand out so we'll use a blue background color, and white text color. We also remove the browser default borders and give it a little border-radius. We'll give it a little spacing with paddings and margins, and make it full-width by applying 100% width.

#form h1 {
    color: #0f2027;
    text-align: center;
}

#form button {
    padding: 10px;
    margin-top: 10px;
    width: 100%;
    color: white;
    background-color: rgb(41, 57, 194);
    border: none;
    border-radius: 4px;
}

To have the inputs stacked below each other we'll use flexbox. To do that we'll set display: flex; and flex-direction: column. For the inputs we'll set a grey border, with a little border-radius. We'll set the display property to block, and make them full-width, by applying width 100%. We'll also set a little padding, so it'll be more spacious. I'll also remove the outline when the input is in focus, by setting outline: 0.

.input-control {
    display: flex;
    flex-direction: column;
}

.input-control input {
    border: 2px solid #f0f0f0;
    border-radius: 4px;
    display: block;
    font-size: 12px;
    padding: 10px;
    width: 100%;
}

.input-control input:focus {
    outline: 0;
}

We'll use two classes ("success" and "error") to give visual feedback to the user on whether the input's value is valid or not. We'll apply these classes from javascript to the input-control div which contains the specific input field. When the success class is present we will set a green border color, otherwise if error is present we'll use a red border color instead. For the error div we'll use a smaller font-size and a red color to show the error messages.

.input-control.success input {
    border-color: #09c372;
}

.input-control.error input {
    border-color: #ff3860;
}

.input-control .error {
    color: #ff3860;
    font-size: 9px;
    height: 13px;
}

Let's do the validation in javascript next!

Javascript

The first thing we have to do is to save references for the form, and the input fields. As we gave id for every input and the form we can easily to do by using getElementById.

const form = document.getElementById('form');
const username = document.getElementById('username');
const email = document.getElementById('email');
const password = document.getElementById('password');
const password2 = document.getElementById('password2');

To prevent the form for automatically submit we have to attach and event listener to our form's submit event. In this event handler function we have to call preventDefault() function to prevent the form from submitting automatically. Instead of submitting we'll call the validateInputs function, which will validate the inputs and if we want to we can submit the form in there after every check passes, but we won't do that in this tutorial. We'll create this validateInputs shortly.

form.addEventListener('submit', e => {
    e.preventDefault();

    validateInputs();
});

We'll also create two helper functions: setErrorsetSuccess. We'll use these helper functions to set the error or success states of the input controls. Let's start with the setError one. It receives two parameters: element, and message. The element will be the input element that is in the specific input-control. So first we have to get the input control parent div. We'll save it into the inputControl variable, and get the input control div by using the parent property of the input element. Next we have to gather the error div, and save it into a variable. We can do that by querying the input control with the error class.
Now we have to set the error div's innerText to be the message that we got in parameters, and remove the success class from the input control (if it exists) and add the error class.

const setError = (element, message) => {
    const inputControl = element.parentElement;
    const errorDisplay = inputControl.querySelector('.error');

    errorDisplay.innerText = message;
    inputControl.classList.add('error');
    inputControl.classList.remove('success')
}

The setSuccess method will be really similar. The first difference is that it won't receive a message as a parameter. We have to clear the error display by setting its innerText to an empty string. Lastly we have to reverse the class application. We'll add the success class to the inputControl and remove the error class (if present).

const setSuccess = element => {
    const inputControl = element.parentElement;
    const errorDisplay = inputControl.querySelector('.error');

    errorDisplay.innerText = '';
    inputControl.classList.add('success');
    inputControl.classList.remove('error');
};

We will create one last helper function to validate emails. This is an optional step, if you don't want to use regular expressions, feel free to just set the input type of the email field to email. The isValidEmail function will take a string as a parameter and use this weird looking regular expression to check whether it is a valid email or not. We'll use String.test() function to test the string against the regex. We'll also convert the email to a string and make it lowercase.

const isValidEmail = email => {
    const re = /^(([^<>()[\]\\.,;:\s@"]+(\.[^<>()[\]\\.,;:\s@"]+)*)|(".+"))@((\[[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\])|(([a-zA-Z\-0-9]+\.)+[a-zA-Z]{2,}))$/;
    return re.test(String(email).toLowerCase());
}

Now we should create the validator validateInputs function. First we will get the value of all the input fields. We can do that by getting the value property's value of the input field references. We'll call the String.trim() function to remove the trailing empty spaces (if any) from the start and end of the values.
Then we can start validating inputs. We'll use if, else statements to do the validation. For the username we will check whether if it is empty or not, by comparing the value with an empty string. If it empty, we'll call the setError function and provide the username element to it, with our error message. Otherwise we'll call the setSuccess method with the username element. Now we have to do this for the other input fields, but the approach will be the same.

const validateInputs = () => {
    const usernameValue = username.value.trim();
    const emailValue = email.value.trim();
    const passwordValue = password.value.trim();
    const password2Value = password2.value.trim();

    if(usernameValue === '') {
        setError(username, 'Username is required');
    } else {
        setSuccess(username);
    }
};

For the email we'll check if it is provided or not, and set an error if it is empty. If it is not empty we'll check whether it is a valid email address, and if not we'll set an error, otherwise we set success for the field.

if(emailValue === '') {
        setError(email, 'Email is required');
    } else if (!isValidEmail(emailValue)) {
        setError(email, 'Provide a valid email address');
    } else {
        setSuccess(email);
    }
}

For the password we'll check whether it is empty or not, and if it is not empty we'll check if it is longer than 7 characters. If not, well set an error, otherwise we'll set it as success.

if(passwordValue === '') {
        setError(password, 'Password is required');
    } else if (passwordValue.length < 8 ) {
        setError(password, 'Password must be at least 8 character.')
    } else {
        setSuccess(password);
    }
}

For the password confirmation we'll check if it is empty, and we should also check if the password confirmation's value is equal to the password's value.

if(password2Value === '') {
        setError(password2, 'Please confirm your password');
    } else if (password2Value !== passwordValue) {
        setError(password2, "Passwords doesn't match");
    } else {
        setSuccess(password2);
    }
}

Now we have every input validated, if we wanted to we could submit our form now to a specific endpoint.

Good job now you have a working form validation Javascript. Please note that you always have to validate the form inputs on the server-side as client-side validation can be easily bypassed. There are way more advanced form validation methods and libraries that we use in modern web development, but this project is a really good way to start and learn the fundamentals.

#javascript

Xander  Crooks

Xander Crooks

1661082420

Himalayausa Clone using React JS and Redux

Inspired from Himalayausa.com

Project-code: closed-birthday-4512

Tech Stack Used

#React.js

#Redux

#Chakra-UI

#React Slick

#JavaScript

#HTML

#CSS

#Heroku

#Versel

#NPM

Deploy link:- Versal

This website was originally inspired from Himalayausa.com Our Team made Tremendus efforts and build this website within 5 consicutive days. We used React.js library for the UI part and used REDUX store for maintaing the states of the components. We used Heroku server API for getting the Mock Data and used Versel to deploy.

sneak peeks of the project...

Landing page...

Alt text

Shop By Category ...

Alt text

Best Seller ...

Alt text

Navbar ...

Alt text

Footer ...

Alt text

About Page ...

Alt text

Login page ...

Alt text

Signup page ...

Alt text

product page ...

Alt text

Single Product ...

Alt text

Cart page ...

Alt text

Checkout page ...

Alt text

Main Contributors

#Anurag Dinkar Pawar GitHub

#Veena Sahu GitHub

#Narayan Chatalwar GitHub

#SHILAJIT PAUL GitHub

#Govind Lakhotiya GitHub


Author: AnuragPawar-132
Source code: https://github.com/AnuragPawar-132/closed-birthday-4512

#react #javascript #Redux