Malvina  O'Hara

Malvina O'Hara

1591266840

Rust Casting, Shadowing, Consts and Static

A mix of topics of casting, shadowing, constants and static variables inside the Rust Programming Language.

This Rust programming language tutorial series is aimed at easing your training step by step. Rust is a systems level language aimed at speed and safety and can be run cross-platform, including embedded systems and even the browser with WebAssembly (WASM)!

#rust #rust casting #rust programming

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Rust Casting, Shadowing, Consts and Static
Malvina  O'Hara

Malvina O'Hara

1591266840

Rust Casting, Shadowing, Consts and Static

A mix of topics of casting, shadowing, constants and static variables inside the Rust Programming Language.

This Rust programming language tutorial series is aimed at easing your training step by step. Rust is a systems level language aimed at speed and safety and can be run cross-platform, including embedded systems and even the browser with WebAssembly (WASM)!

#rust #rust casting #rust programming

Tyrique  Littel

Tyrique Littel

1604008800

Static Code Analysis: What It Is? How to Use It?

Static code analysis refers to the technique of approximating the runtime behavior of a program. In other words, it is the process of predicting the output of a program without actually executing it.

Lately, however, the term “Static Code Analysis” is more commonly used to refer to one of the applications of this technique rather than the technique itself — program comprehension — understanding the program and detecting issues in it (anything from syntax errors to type mismatches, performance hogs likely bugs, security loopholes, etc.). This is the usage we’d be referring to throughout this post.

“The refinement of techniques for the prompt discovery of error serves as well as any other as a hallmark of what we mean by science.”

  • J. Robert Oppenheimer

Outline

We cover a lot of ground in this post. The aim is to build an understanding of static code analysis and to equip you with the basic theory, and the right tools so that you can write analyzers on your own.

We start our journey with laying down the essential parts of the pipeline which a compiler follows to understand what a piece of code does. We learn where to tap points in this pipeline to plug in our analyzers and extract meaningful information. In the latter half, we get our feet wet, and write four such static analyzers, completely from scratch, in Python.

Note that although the ideas here are discussed in light of Python, static code analyzers across all programming languages are carved out along similar lines. We chose Python because of the availability of an easy to use ast module, and wide adoption of the language itself.

How does it all work?

Before a computer can finally “understand” and execute a piece of code, it goes through a series of complicated transformations:

static analysis workflow

As you can see in the diagram (go ahead, zoom it!), the static analyzers feed on the output of these stages. To be able to better understand the static analysis techniques, let’s look at each of these steps in some more detail:

Scanning

The first thing that a compiler does when trying to understand a piece of code is to break it down into smaller chunks, also known as tokens. Tokens are akin to what words are in a language.

A token might consist of either a single character, like (, or literals (like integers, strings, e.g., 7Bob, etc.), or reserved keywords of that language (e.g, def in Python). Characters which do not contribute towards the semantics of a program, like trailing whitespace, comments, etc. are often discarded by the scanner.

Python provides the tokenize module in its standard library to let you play around with tokens:

Python

1

import io

2

import tokenize

3

4

code = b"color = input('Enter your favourite color: ')"

5

6

for token in tokenize.tokenize(io.BytesIO(code).readline):

7

    print(token)

Python

1

TokenInfo(type=62 (ENCODING),  string='utf-8')

2

TokenInfo(type=1  (NAME),      string='color')

3

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string='=')

4

TokenInfo(type=1  (NAME),      string='input')

5

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string='(')

6

TokenInfo(type=3  (STRING),    string="'Enter your favourite color: '")

7

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string=')')

8

TokenInfo(type=4  (NEWLINE),   string='')

9

TokenInfo(type=0  (ENDMARKER), string='')

(Note that for the sake of readability, I’ve omitted a few columns from the result above — metadata like starting index, ending index, a copy of the line on which a token occurs, etc.)

#code quality #code review #static analysis #static code analysis #code analysis #static analysis tools #code review tips #static code analyzer #static code analysis tool #static analyzer

Rust Lang Course For Beginner In 2021: Guessing Game

 What we learn in this chapter:
- Rust number types and their default
- First exposure to #Rust modules and the std::io module to read input from the terminal
- Rust Variable Shadowing
- Rust Loop keyword
- Rust if/else
- First exposure to #Rust match keyword

=== Content:
00:00 - Intro & Setup
02:11 - The Plan
03:04 - Variable Secret
04:03 - Number Types
05:45 - Mutability recap
06:22 - Ask the user
07:45 - First intro to module std::io
08:29 - Rust naming conventions
09:22 - Read user input io:stdin().read_line(&mut guess)
12:46 - Break & Understand
14:20 - Parse string to number
17:10 - Variable Shadowing
18:46 - If / Else - You Win, You Loose
19:28 - Loop
20:38 - Match
23:19 - Random with rand
26:35 - Run it all
27:09 - Conclusion and next episode

#rust 

Lydia  Kessler

Lydia Kessler

1626318000

ULTIMATE Rust Lang Tutorial! - Publishing a Rust Crate

The ultimate Rust lang tutorial. Follow along as we go through the Rust lang book chapter by chapter.

📝Get the FREE Rust Cheatsheet: https://letsgetrusty.com/cheatsheet

The Rust book: https://doc.rust-lang.org/stable/book/​​

Chapters:
0:00​ Intro
0:43 Release Profiles
3:00 Documentation Comments
4:32 Commonly Used Sections
5:04 Documentation Comments as Tests
5:50 Commenting Contained Items
6:29 Exporting a Public API
8:44 Setting up Creates.io Account
9:54 Adding Metadata to a New Create
12:14 Publishing to Crates.io
12:49 Removing Version from Crates.io
13:37 Outro

#letsgetrusty​​ #rust​lang​ #tutorial

#rust #rust lang #rust crate

Alayna  Rippin

Alayna Rippin

1602316800

"Rust Isn’t Afraid to be Imperfect as Long as we Ship something Useful"

Steve Klabnik is a member of the Rust core team, an active open-source contributor, and author of The Rust Programming Language, Rails 4 in Action, and Designing Hypermedia APIs books. In 2012 and 2016, we invited Steve to speak at the RailsClub (now RubyRussia) conference. Since then, Steve has been working on Rust a lot, did a lot of interesting things and we realized that we should definitely interview him once again!

We sat down with Steve to hear from him first-hand about his professional activities at the moment, the design success of Rust, a little about the “full-stack” development hype, and overcoming burnouts.

The Interview

**Evrone: **Besides your open source contributions, what are your professional activities at the moment?

Steve: I work at Oxide Computer Company, writing a bunch of Rust code!

**Evrone: **Are there any other technologies other than Ruby and Rust that you find interesting?

**Steve: **Rust is my focus at the moment, but I’m very interested in the rise of “headless CMS”es and JAMStack.

**Evrone: **You spent a lot of time hunting for theorycraft beasts to create top-notch documentation for Rust developers. Looking back at the language evolution, what do you think is the main design success that added the most to the language popularity?

**Steve: **The biggest thing was wanting to be useful. We tried to be familiar as much as possible, so that the few new ideas could get the focus. Rust isn’t afraid to be imperfect, as long as we ship something useful.

**Evrone: **What is your favorite software toolset for everyday work?

#ruby #ruby-on-rails #rust #devops #rust-programming-language #interview #interview-transcript #rust-on-vim