Fredy  Larson

Fredy Larson

1615605601

Higher Order Functions in JavaScript – Reach New Heights in Your JS Code

Higher Order Functions provide a higher level of abstraction for functions. They have the potential to take your JavaScript code to new heights!

What is a Higher Order Function?

Let’s look at the name, and consider how we talk about things.

We dig down into the details, but sometimes we want a high level view of things.

This high level view indicates more abstraction. We go down into details, but we elevate into a more abstract viewpoint.

Higher Order Functions are exactly that: A higher level of abstraction than your typical functions.

So how can we define a Higher Order Function?

Higher Orders Functions are functions that perform operations on other functions.

In this definition, operations can mean taking one or more functions as an argument OR returning a function as the result. It doesn’t have to do both. Doing one or the other qualifies a function as a higher order function.

#javascript #programming #developer

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Higher Order Functions in JavaScript – Reach New Heights in Your JS Code
Tia  Gottlieb

Tia Gottlieb

1595831640

Functional Programming: Higher Order Functions

A Better Take on JavaScript’s Higher Order Functions.

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Functional Programming is awesome! It makes programming fun.

Learning to program “functionally” is going to make you a fantastic programmer and you will feel secure with the quality of your work.

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You will be able to write your programs with fewer bugs and in less time because you will be able to re-use your code.

Within this paradigm, we will focus on one of the most important concepts in functional programming, and that is Higher-Order Functions.


So let’s get started!

In JavaScript, and in many functional programming languages, functions are values.

Let’s take a simple function for example:

function double(x) {
  return x * 2
}

What is super cool about JavaScript is that we can take this function and make it into an anonymous function to pass it around and re-use it by declaring a variable.

let double = function(x) {
    return x * 2
 }

let pancake = double 
pancake(40) // 80

We declared a variable _double _and assigned it to the anonymous function. Then we declared another variable, pancake, and assign it to the same function. Just like strings and numbers, functions too can be assigned to variables.

So, in functional programming, functions are values and they can be assigned to variables and they can also be passed into other functions.

Functions that operate on other functions, either by taking them as arguments or by returning them, are called higher-order functions. — see Eloquent JavaScript

In other words, as pertaining to our example, higher-order functions can be understood as functions being passed into other functions to do awesome things!!!

Sure, that makes sense, right? But what are these good for?

Composition.

The fact that we can take one function and put it into another function allows us to compose a lot of small functions into bigger functions.

Let’s look at how to use one of these higher-order functions. Probably the most basic and useful function is

Filter( )

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Filter() is a function on the array that accepts another function as its argument, which it will use to return a new filtered version of the array.

Let’s make a fun array of something.

const pets = [

  { name: 'Flip flop', species: 'rabbit' },
  { name: 'Dino', species: 'dog' },
  { name: 'Ralph', species: 'fish' },
  { name: 'Chuchi', species: 'cat' },
  { name: 'Ari', species: 'dog' },
  { name: 'Spock', species: 'dog' },
  { name: 'ying yang', species: 'cat' },
]

What we want to do here is to just “filter” out all the dogs.

Our output must include Dino, Ari, and Spock. 😆

Question: How would I do this with a normal loop?

#higher-order-function #javascript #security #programming #code-review #function

Higher-Order Functions Beginners Should Be Familiar With.

Higher-order functions are functions that operate on other functions, either by taking them as arguments or by returning them.

There are a lot more higher order functions than what will be covered in this article, but these are good ones to get you up and running as a beginner. These standard array methods are forEach() , filter() , map() and sort() .

  1. **forEach( ): **This is used when you want to operate on or interact with any element inside of an array. Basically works like the_ for loop._

N.B- I’d be using examples to illustrate each method so you can get a clearer picture, and also just printing to the console to keep the examples as simple and basic as possible.

Example: Lets say in an array of a group or friends, and we want to loop through that array and print to the console each element of that array.

Using a for loop ;

const friends = ['Toyin', 'Olumide', 'Fola', 'Tola'];

for ( let i=0; i < friends.length ; i++) {
  cosole.log (friends[i])
};

The action same as above can be achieved using theforEach() method as seen below;

const friends =  ['Toyin', 'Olumide', 'Fola', 'Tola'];

friends.forEach(function(name) {
  console.log(name)
};

What the forEach() method simply does is to take in a function as an argument and loop through each item in the array without using iteration[i].

This is really awesome when the ES6 arrow functions are used, our code is reduced to a single line that is clean and maintainable. As seen below:

const friends =  ['Toyin', 'Olumide', 'Fola', 'Tola'];

friends.forEach(name => console.log (name));

2. **_filter( ) : _**Just like the name implies, it is used to filter out elements of an array that do not meet the conditions set in the callback function passed as an argument. The callback function passed to the filter() method accepts 3 parameters: elementindex, and array , but most times only the element parameter is used.

**Example : **In an array showing a group of friends and their ages, lets say we want to print to the console the friends that can drink assuming the age limit for drinking is 18. Using a for loop without high order functions;

const friends = [
  {name : 'Toyin', age: 24},
  {name : 'Olumide', age: 14},
  {name : 'Fola', age: 12},
  {name : 'David', age: 42}
];
for ( let i=0 ; i<friends.length ; i++) {
   if (friends[i].age > 18) {
    console.log(`${friends[i].name} can drink`);
 }
};

Now using the filter() method :

const friends = [
  {name : 'Toyin', age: 24},
  {name : 'Olumide', age: 14},
  {name : 'Fola', age: 12},
  {name : 'David', age: 42}
];
friends.filter (function (friend) {
  if (friend.age > 18){
   return true;
 } 
});

#functional-programming #beginners-guide #javascript #higher-order-function #es5-vs-es6 #function

Madyson  Reilly

Madyson Reilly

1601069940

Function Expression vs Function Declaration in JavaScript

Function Expression vs Function Declaration in JavaScript.

It was until during one of the JavaScript mock interviews did I came across the term function expression.

The question was: What is the difference between these two syntax?

function x(){

}

let x = function(){

}

I was clueless for a moment. After thinking a little, I could only come up with: the second syntax invokes an _anonymous _function and is assigned to a variable.

I was alien to the term hoisting.

In this article, we will acquaint ourselves with three simple terms: function declaration,_ function expression, _and hoisting.

What is function declaration?

Function declaration is also known as _function statement. _It contains the name of the function, parameters, and a return statement. **Naming the function **is what sets function declaration apart. Parameters and return statement is optional.

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Function Declaration

What is function expression?

Function expression also has a name, parameters, and return statement. All of which are optional. The important thing to bear in mind is: the function here is _assigned _to a JavaScript variable.

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Function Expression

#function-expression #function-declaration #functions-in-javascript #coding #javascript #express

Giles  Goodwin

Giles Goodwin

1603176407

The real reason why JavaScript has arrow functions

Nowadays, all my code is based on the use of arrow functions. If you are still not using them yourself, then don’t be ashamed of who you are. That’s your parent’s job. Instead, find about all the benefits that you can get by using arrow functions like the cool kids.

This is an example of arrow function and the same code written traditionally:

const arrowFunction = (arg1, arg2) => arg1 + arg 2;

const traditionalFunction = function(arg1, arg2) {
  return arg1 + arg2;
};

You may notice that the code is shorter and that there is an arrow. Everything before the arrow is arguments of the function and everything after the arrow is always returned as the result of the function.

If you need a function that contains multiple statements you can still do this:

const arrowFunction = (arg1, arg2) => {
  const result = arg1 + arg2;
  return result;
};

#javascript #js #functional-javascript #functional-programming #javascript-tips

Vincent Lab

Vincent Lab

1605017502

The Difference Between Regular Functions and Arrow Functions in JavaScript

Other then the syntactical differences. The main difference is the way the this keyword behaves? In an arrow function, the this keyword remains the same throughout the life-cycle of the function and is always bound to the value of this in the closest non-arrow parent function. Arrow functions can never be constructor functions so they can never be invoked with the new keyword. And they can never have duplicate named parameters like a regular function not using strict mode.

Here are a few code examples to show you some of the differences
this.name = "Bob";

const person = {
name: “Jon”,

<span style="color: #008000">// Regular function</span>
func1: <span style="color: #0000ff">function</span> () {
    console.log(<span style="color: #0000ff">this</span>);
},

<span style="color: #008000">// Arrow function</span>
func2: () =&gt; {
    console.log(<span style="color: #0000ff">this</span>);
}

}

person.func1(); // Call the Regular function
// Output: {name:“Jon”, func1:[Function: func1], func2:[Function: func2]}

person.func2(); // Call the Arrow function
// Output: {name:“Bob”}

The new keyword with an arrow function
const person = (name) => console.log("Your name is " + name);
const bob = new person("Bob");
// Uncaught TypeError: person is not a constructor

If you want to see a visual presentation on the differences, then you can see the video below:

#arrow functions #javascript #regular functions #arrow functions vs normal functions #difference between functions and arrow functions