Wasswa  Meagan

Wasswa Meagan

1621106400

Visualizing The Code Coverage Results From Azure Pipelines in Visual Studio

In a previous posts, I explained how to computing code coverage for a .NET Core project with Azure DevOps and Coverlet. In this post, the code coverage visualization could be done directly in Azure DevOps. As a developer, you want to see these results directly into the IDE.

  1. Download the code coverage file from the build artifacts
  2. Open the file in Visual Studio
  3. In the “Code Coverage Results” tool window, find the method you want and double click on it to open the file in the editor with the coverage highlight

#azure devops #azure #tools #visual studio

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Visualizing The Code Coverage Results From Azure Pipelines in Visual Studio
Connor Mills

Connor Mills

1659063683

HTML, CSS & JavaScript Project: Build Cocktail App

In this tutorial, we will learn how to create a cocktail app with HTML, CSS and Javascript.

Create a cocktail app where the user can search a cocktail of choice and the app displays the ingredients and instructions to make the cocktail. We use 'The Cocktail DB' API to fetch information required for our app.

Project Folder Structure:

Before we start coding let us take look at the project folder structure. We create a project folder called – ‘Cocktail App’. Inside this folder, we have three files. These files are index.html, style.css and script.js.

HTML:

We start with the HTML code. First, copy the code below and paste it into your HTML document.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
  <head>
    <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0" />
    <title>Cocktail App</title>
    <!-- Google Font -->
    <link
      href="https://fonts.googleapis.com/css2?family=Poppins:wght@400;600&display=swap"
      rel="stylesheet"
    />
    <!-- Stylesheet -->
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="style.css" />
  </head>
  <body>
    <div class="container">
      <div class="search-container">
        <input
          type="text"
          placeholder="Type a cocktail name..."
          id="user-inp"
          value="margarita"
        />
        <button id="search-btn">Search</button>
      </div>
      <div id="result"></div>
    </div>
    <!-- Script -->
    <script src="script.js"></script>
  </body>
</html>

CSS:

Next, we style this app using CSS. For this copy, the code provided to you below and paste it into your stylesheet.

* {
  padding: 0;
  margin: 0;
  box-sizing: border-box;
  font-family: "Poppins", sans-serif;
}
body {
  height: 100vh;
  background: linear-gradient(#5372f0 50%, #000000 50%);
}
.container {
  position: absolute;
  transform: translate(-50%, -50%);
  top: 50%;
  left: 50%;
  width: 90vw;
  max-width: 37.5em;
  background-color: #ffffff;
  padding: 1.8em;
  border-radius: 0.6em;
  box-shadow: 0 1em 3em rgba(2, 9, 38, 0.25);
}
.search-container {
  display: grid;
  grid-template-columns: 9fr 3fr;
  gap: 1em;
  margin-bottom: 1.2em;
}
.search-container input {
  font-size: 1em;
  padding: 0.6em 0.3em;
  border: none;
  outline: none;
  color: #1f194c;
  border-bottom: 1.5px solid #1f194c;
}
.search-container input:focus {
  border-color: #5372f0;
}
.search-container button {
  font-size: 1em;
  border-radius: 2em;
  background-color: #5372f0;
  border: none;
  outline: none;
  color: #ffffff;
  cursor: pointer;
}
#result {
  color: #575a7b;
  line-height: 2em;
}
#result img {
  display: block;
  max-width: 12.5em;
  margin: auto;
}
#result h2 {
  font-size: 1.25em;
  margin: 0.8em 0 1.6em 0;
  text-align: center;
  text-transform: uppercase;
  font-weight: 600;
  letter-spacing: 0.05em;
  color: #1f194c;
  position: relative;
}
#result h2:before {
  content: "";
  position: absolute;
  width: 15%;
  height: 3px;
  background-color: #5372f0;
  left: 42.5%;
  bottom: -0.3em;
}
#result h3 {
  font-size: 1.1em;
  font-weight: 600;
  margin-bottom: 0.2em;
  color: #1f194c;
}
#result ul {
  margin-bottom: 1em;
  margin-left: 1.8em;
  display: grid;
  grid-template-columns: auto auto;
}
#result li {
  margin-bottom: 0.3em;
}
#result p {
  text-align: justify;
  font-weight: 400;
  font-size: 0.95em;
}
.msg {
  text-align: center;
}
@media screen and (max-width: 600px) {
  .container {
    font-size: 14px;
  }
}

Javascript:

Lastly, we implement the functionality using Javascript. Now copy the code below and paste it into your script file.

let result = document.getElementById("result");
let searchBtn = document.getElementById("search-btn");
let url = "https://thecocktaildb.com/api/json/v1/1/search.php?s=";
let getInfo = () => {
  let userInp = document.getElementById("user-inp").value;
  if (userInp.length == 0) {
    result.innerHTML = `<h3 class="msg">The input field cannot be empty</h3>`;
  } else {
    fetch(url + userInp)
      .then((response) => response.json())
      .then((data) => {
        document.getElementById("user-inp").value = "";
        console.log(data);
        console.log(data.drinks[0]);
        let myDrink = data.drinks[0];
        console.log(myDrink.strDrink);
        console.log(myDrink.strDrinkThumb);
        console.log(myDrink.strInstructions);
        let count = 1;
        let ingredients = [];
        for (let i in myDrink) {
          let ingredient = "";
          let measure = "";
          if (i.startsWith("strIngredient") && myDrink[i]) {
            ingredient = myDrink[i];
            if (myDrink[`strMeasure` + count]) {
              measure = myDrink[`strMeasure` + count];
            } else {
              measure = "";
            }
            count += 1;
            ingredients.push(`${measure} ${ingredient}`);
          }
        }
        console.log(ingredients);
        result.innerHTML = `
      <img src=${myDrink.strDrinkThumb}>
      <h2>${myDrink.strDrink}</h2>
      <h3>Ingredients:</h3>
      <ul class="ingredients"></ul>
      <h3>Instructions:</h3>
      <p>${myDrink.strInstructions}</p>
      `;
        let ingredientsCon = document.querySelector(".ingredients");
        ingredients.forEach((item) => {
          let listItem = document.createElement("li");
          listItem.innerText = item;
          ingredientsCon.appendChild(listItem);
        });
      })
      .catch(() => {
        result.innerHTML = `<h3 class="msg">Please enter a valid input</h3>`;
      });
  }
};
window.addEventListener("load", getInfo);
searchBtn.addEventListener("click", getInfo);

📁 Download Source Code:  https://www.codingartistweb.com

#html #css #javascript 

Wasswa  Meagan

Wasswa Meagan

1621106400

Visualizing The Code Coverage Results From Azure Pipelines in Visual Studio

In a previous posts, I explained how to computing code coverage for a .NET Core project with Azure DevOps and Coverlet. In this post, the code coverage visualization could be done directly in Azure DevOps. As a developer, you want to see these results directly into the IDE.

  1. Download the code coverage file from the build artifacts
  2. Open the file in Visual Studio
  3. In the “Code Coverage Results” tool window, find the method you want and double click on it to open the file in the editor with the coverage highlight

#azure devops #azure #tools #visual studio

COMO USAR e trabalhar com Code Review no Visual Studio Code

Não é todo programador que gosta de compartilhar o seu trabalho ou até mesmo receber feedbacks de como o seu código foi escrito, mas o Code Review é cada vez mais comum em empresas do mundo todo.

Conheça uma extensão para Visual Studio Code e comece a trabalhar com Code Review em seu próximo projeto. Essa é a sua chance de saber COMO USAR e trabalhar com Code Review no Visual Studio Code.

#visual studio code #code review #visual studio #code

Brain  Crist

Brain Crist

1596975120

Writing Visual Studio Extensions with Mads - Episode 1: Item Templates

Join Mads Kristensen from the Visual Studio team each week as he builds extensions for Visual Studio live!

#visual studio code #visual studio #code #microsoft #visual studio extensions

Rylan  Becker

Rylan Becker

1621121100

Writing U-SQL scripts using Visual Studio for Azure Data Lake Analytics

In the 2nd article of the series for Azure Data Lake Analytics, we will use Visual Studio for writing U-SQL scripts.

Introduction

Azure Data Lake stores the unstructured, structured, and semi-structured data in the Azure cloud infrastructure. You can use Azure portal, Azure Data Factory(ADF), Azure CLI, or various other tools. In the previous article, An overview of Azure Data Lake Analytics and U-SQL, we explored the Azure Data lake Analytics using the U-SQL script.

In this article, we will understand U-SQL scripts and executing them using Visual Studio.

U-SQL scripts execution in the Visual Studio

U-SQL is known as a big data query language, and it combines the syntax similar to t-SQL and the power of C## language. You can extract, transform data in the required format using the scripts. It has few predefined extractors for CSV, Text, TSV for extracting data from these formats. Similarly, it allows you to convert the output to your desired format. It offers big data processing from gigabyte to petabyte scale. You can combine data from Azure Data Lake Storage, Azure SQL DB Azure Blob Storage, Azure SQL Data Warehouse.

You can develop and execute the scripts locally using Visual Studio. Later, you can move your resources to the Azure cloud. This approach allows you to save the cost for Azure resources ( compute and storage) because in the Visual Studio, it does not cost you for the executions.

To use these scripts in the Visual Studio, you should have _the _Azure Data Lake and Stream Analytics Tools installed. You can navigate to Visual Studio installer -> Workloads-> Data Storage and processing -> Azure Data lake and Stream Analytics.

Launch the Visual Studio 2019 and create a new U-SQL project. You get a few other templates such as Class Library, Unit Test project and sample application as well. We will work with a project template that creates a project with your USQL scripts.

#azure #sql azure #visual studio #azure data lake analytics #visual studio #u-sql