Xander  Crooks

Xander Crooks

1660959780

MAESTRO: A Kubernetes Monitoring tool Built on Electron with React

MAESTRO

A Kubernetes monitoring tool built on electron.

Summary

Maestro is an open-source monitoring tool for keeping track of the health of your Kubernetes cluster. Maestro is lightweight and allows users to view key metrics at a glance. This tool leverages the K8s API to obtain important cluster data, and promQL queries to scrape key metrics and display them in a digestible format.

Features

  1. At a glance overview of nodes, pods, services, and deployments visualized as cubes. Hover over any cube to see which node, pod, deployment, or service you are looking at.

props

  1. Log GUI to quickly view alerts and events in an easy to read format, with the ability to sort by severity.

logs

  1. Graphs displaying key metrics such at CPU usage, memory usage, and network I/O. Multi-colored line graphs map to corresponding properties in the legend, where you can remove properties tht you want to get a more narrowly focused graph.

metrics

Getting Started

1. Prerequisites

Users must have Prometheus installed on their Kubernetes cluster.

2. Clone this repo using the following command

https://github.com/oslabs-beta/maestro.git

3. Make sure your cluster is ported forward to port 9090 using the following command

kubectl port-forward -n default svc/prometheus-kube-prometheus-prometheus 9090 

4. In the Maestro directory in your terminal, run the following commands

npm install
npm run webpack-start
npm run start

5. Enjoy your Maestro experience!

Built With

The Team


Author: oslabs-beta
Source code: https://github.com/oslabs-beta/maestro

#react #typescript #Kubernetes 

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

MAESTRO: A Kubernetes Monitoring tool Built on Electron with React
Christa  Stehr

Christa Stehr

1602964260

50+ Useful Kubernetes Tools for 2020 - Part 2

Introduction

Last year, we provided a list of Kubernetes tools that proved so popular we have decided to curate another list of some useful additions for working with the platform—among which are many tools that we personally use here at Caylent. Check out the original tools list here in case you missed it.

According to a recent survey done by Stackrox, the dominance Kubernetes enjoys in the market continues to be reinforced, with 86% of respondents using it for container orchestration.

(State of Kubernetes and Container Security, 2020)

And as you can see below, more and more companies are jumping into containerization for their apps. If you’re among them, here are some tools to aid you going forward as Kubernetes continues its rapid growth.

(State of Kubernetes and Container Security, 2020)

#blog #tools #amazon elastic kubernetes service #application security #aws kms #botkube #caylent #cli #container monitoring #container orchestration tools #container security #containers #continuous delivery #continuous deployment #continuous integration #contour #developers #development #developments #draft #eksctl #firewall #gcp #github #harbor #helm #helm charts #helm-2to3 #helm-aws-secret-plugin #helm-docs #helm-operator-get-started #helm-secrets #iam #json #k-rail #k3s #k3sup #k8s #keel.sh #keycloak #kiali #kiam #klum #knative #krew #ksniff #kube #kube-prod-runtime #kube-ps1 #kube-scan #kube-state-metrics #kube2iam #kubeapps #kubebuilder #kubeconfig #kubectl #kubectl-aws-secrets #kubefwd #kubernetes #kubernetes command line tool #kubernetes configuration #kubernetes deployment #kubernetes in development #kubernetes in production #kubernetes ingress #kubernetes interfaces #kubernetes monitoring #kubernetes networking #kubernetes observability #kubernetes plugins #kubernetes secrets #kubernetes security #kubernetes security best practices #kubernetes security vendors #kubernetes service discovery #kubernetic #kubesec #kubeterminal #kubeval #kudo #kuma #microsoft azure key vault #mozilla sops #octant #octarine #open source #palo alto kubernetes security #permission-manager #pgp #rafay #rakess #rancher #rook #secrets operations #serverless function #service mesh #shell-operator #snyk #snyk container #sonobuoy #strongdm #tcpdump #tenkai #testing #tigera #tilt #vert.x #wireshark #yaml

Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1598839687

How native is React Native? | React Native vs Native App Development

If you are undertaking a mobile app development for your start-up or enterprise, you are likely wondering whether to use React Native. As a popular development framework, React Native helps you to develop near-native mobile apps. However, you are probably also wondering how close you can get to a native app by using React Native. How native is React Native?

In the article, we discuss the similarities between native mobile development and development using React Native. We also touch upon where they differ and how to bridge the gaps. Read on.

A brief introduction to React Native

Let’s briefly set the context first. We will briefly touch upon what React Native is and how it differs from earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is a popular JavaScript framework that Facebook has created. You can use this open-source framework to code natively rendering Android and iOS mobile apps. You can use it to develop web apps too.

Facebook has developed React Native based on React, its JavaScript library. The first release of React Native came in March 2015. At the time of writing this article, the latest stable release of React Native is 0.62.0, and it was released in March 2020.

Although relatively new, React Native has acquired a high degree of popularity. The “Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2019” report identifies it as the 8th most loved framework. Facebook, Walmart, and Bloomberg are some of the top companies that use React Native.

The popularity of React Native comes from its advantages. Some of its advantages are as follows:

  • Performance: It delivers optimal performance.
  • Cross-platform development: You can develop both Android and iOS apps with it. The reuse of code expedites development and reduces costs.
  • UI design: React Native enables you to design simple and responsive UI for your mobile app.
  • 3rd party plugins: This framework supports 3rd party plugins.
  • Developer community: A vibrant community of developers support React Native.

Why React Native is fundamentally different from earlier hybrid frameworks

Are you wondering whether React Native is just another of those hybrid frameworks like Ionic or Cordova? It’s not! React Native is fundamentally different from these earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is very close to native. Consider the following aspects as described on the React Native website:

  • Access to many native platforms features: The primitives of React Native render to native platform UI. This means that your React Native app will use many native platform APIs as native apps would do.
  • Near-native user experience: React Native provides several native components, and these are platform agnostic.
  • The ease of accessing native APIs: React Native uses a declarative UI paradigm. This enables React Native to interact easily with native platform APIs since React Native wraps existing native code.

Due to these factors, React Native offers many more advantages compared to those earlier hybrid frameworks. We now review them.

#android app #frontend #ios app #mobile app development #benefits of react native #is react native good for mobile app development #native vs #pros and cons of react native #react mobile development #react native development #react native experience #react native framework #react native ios vs android #react native pros and cons #react native vs android #react native vs native #react native vs native performance #react vs native #why react native #why use react native

Maestro: A Kubernetes Monitoring tool Built on Electron

MAESTRO

A Kubernetes monitoring tool built on electron.

Summary

Maestro is an open-source monitoring tool for keeping track of the health of your Kubernetes cluster. Maestro is lightweight and allows users to view key metrics at a glance. This tool leverages the K8s API to obtain important cluster data, and promQL queries to scrape key metrics and display them in a digestible format.

Features

  1. At a glance overview of nodes, pods, services, and deployments visualized as cubes. Hover over any cube to see which node, pod, deployment, or service you are looking at.

props

  1. Log GUI to quickly view alerts and events in an easy to read format, with the ability to sort by severity.

logs

  1. Graphs displaying key metrics such at CPU usage, memory usage, and network I/O. Multi-colored line graphs map to corresponding properties in the legend, where you can remove properties tht you want to get a more narrowly focused graph.

metrics

Getting Started

1. Prerequisites

Users must have Prometheus installed on their Kubernetes cluster.

2. Clone this repo using the following command

https://github.com/oslabs-beta/maestro.git

3. Make sure your cluster is ported forward to port 9090 using the following command

kubectl port-forward -n default svc/prometheus-kube-prometheus-prometheus 9090 

4. In the Maestro directory in your terminal, run the following commands

npm install
npm run webpack-start
npm run start

5. Enjoy your Maestro experience!

Built With


Download details:

Author:  oslabs-beta
Source code: https://github.com/oslabs-beta/maestro

#react-native #react #electron #kubernetes 

Xander  Crooks

Xander Crooks

1660959780

MAESTRO: A Kubernetes Monitoring tool Built on Electron with React

MAESTRO

A Kubernetes monitoring tool built on electron.

Summary

Maestro is an open-source monitoring tool for keeping track of the health of your Kubernetes cluster. Maestro is lightweight and allows users to view key metrics at a glance. This tool leverages the K8s API to obtain important cluster data, and promQL queries to scrape key metrics and display them in a digestible format.

Features

  1. At a glance overview of nodes, pods, services, and deployments visualized as cubes. Hover over any cube to see which node, pod, deployment, or service you are looking at.

props

  1. Log GUI to quickly view alerts and events in an easy to read format, with the ability to sort by severity.

logs

  1. Graphs displaying key metrics such at CPU usage, memory usage, and network I/O. Multi-colored line graphs map to corresponding properties in the legend, where you can remove properties tht you want to get a more narrowly focused graph.

metrics

Getting Started

1. Prerequisites

Users must have Prometheus installed on their Kubernetes cluster.

2. Clone this repo using the following command

https://github.com/oslabs-beta/maestro.git

3. Make sure your cluster is ported forward to port 9090 using the following command

kubectl port-forward -n default svc/prometheus-kube-prometheus-prometheus 9090 

4. In the Maestro directory in your terminal, run the following commands

npm install
npm run webpack-start
npm run start

5. Enjoy your Maestro experience!

Built With

The Team


Author: oslabs-beta
Source code: https://github.com/oslabs-beta/maestro

#react #typescript #Kubernetes 

Carmen  Grimes

Carmen Grimes

1598959140

How to Monitor Third Party API Integrations

Many enterprises and SaaS companies depend on a variety of external API integrations in order to build an awesome customer experience. Some integrations may outsource certain business functionality such as handling payments or search to companies like Stripe and Algolia. You may have integrated other partners which expand the functionality of your product offering, For example, if you want to add real-time alerts to an analytics tool, you might want to integrate the PagerDuty and Slack APIs into your application.

If you’re like most companies though, you’ll soon realize you’re integrating hundreds of different vendors and partners into your app. Any one of them could have performance or functional issues impacting your customer experience. Worst yet, the reliability of an integration may be less visible than your own APIs and backend. If the login functionality is broken, you’ll have many customers complaining they cannot log into your website. However, if your Slack integration is broken, only the customers who added Slack to their account will be impacted. On top of that, since the integration is asynchronous, your customers may not realize the integration is broken until after a few days when they haven’t received any alerts for some time.

How do you ensure your API integrations are reliable and high performing? After all, if you’re selling a feature real-time alerting, you’re alerts better well be real-time and have at least once guaranteed delivery. Dropping alerts because your Slack or PagerDuty integration is unacceptable from a customer experience perspective.

What to monitor

Latency

Specific API integrations that have an exceedingly high latency could be a signal that your integration is about to fail. Maybe your pagination scheme is incorrect or the vendor has not indexed your data in the best way for you to efficiently query.

Latency best practices

Average latency only tells you half the story. An API that consistently takes one second to complete is usually better than an API with high variance. For example if an API only takes 30 milliseconds on average, but 1 out of 10 API calls take up to five seconds, then you have high variance in your customer experience. This is makes it much harder to track down bugs and harder to handle in your customer experience. This is why 90th percentile and 95th percentiles are important to look at.

Reliability

Reliability is a key metric to monitor especially since your integrating APIs that you don’t have control over. What percent of API calls are failing? In order to track reliability, you should have a rigid definition on what constitutes a failure.

Reliability best practices

While any API call that has a response status code in the 4xx or 5xx family may be considered an error, you might have specific business cases where the API appears to successfully complete yet the API call should still be considered a failure. For example, a data API integration that returns no matches or no content consistently could be considered failing even though the status code is always 200 OK. Another API could be returning bogus or incomplete data. Data validation is critical for measuring where the data returned is correct and up to date.

Not every API provider and integration partner follows suggested status code mapping

Availability

While reliability is specific to errors and functional correctness, availability and uptime is a pure infrastructure metric that measures how often a service has an outage, even if temporary. Availability is usually measured as a percentage of uptime per year or number of 9’s.

AVAILABILITY %DOWNTIME PER YEARDOWNTIME PER MONTHDOWNTIME PER WEEKDOWNTIME PER DAY90% (“one nine”)36.53 days73.05 hours16.80 hours2.40 hours99% (“two nines”)3.65 days7.31 hours1.68 hours14.40 minutes99.9% (“three nines”)8.77 hours43.83 minutes10.08 minutes1.44 minutes99.99% (“four nines”)52.60 minutes4.38 minutes1.01 minutes8.64 seconds99.999% (“five nines”)5.26 minutes26.30 seconds6.05 seconds864.00 milliseconds99.9999% (“six nines”)31.56 seconds2.63 seconds604.80 milliseconds86.40 milliseconds99.99999% (“seven nines”)3.16 seconds262.98 milliseconds60.48 milliseconds8.64 milliseconds99.999999% (“eight nines”)315.58 milliseconds26.30 milliseconds6.05 milliseconds864.00 microseconds99.9999999% (“nine nines”)31.56 milliseconds2.63 milliseconds604.80 microseconds86.40 microseconds

Usage

Many API providers are priced on API usage. Even if the API is free, they most likely have some sort of rate limiting implemented on the API to ensure bad actors are not starving out good clients. This means tracking your API usage with each integration partner is critical to understand when your current usage is close to the plan limits or their rate limits.

Usage best practices

It’s recommended to tie usage back to your end-users even if the API integration is quite downstream from your customer experience. This enables measuring the direct ROI of specific integrations and finding trends. For example, let’s say your product is a CRM, and you are paying Clearbit $199 dollars a month to enrich up to 2,500 companies. That is a direct cost you have and is tied to your customer’s usage. If you have a free tier and they are using the most of your Clearbit quota, you may want to reconsider your pricing strategy. Potentially, Clearbit enrichment should be on the paid tiers only to reduce your own cost.

How to monitor API integrations

Monitoring API integrations seems like the correct remedy to stay on top of these issues. However, traditional Application Performance Monitoring (APM) tools like New Relic and AppDynamics focus more on monitoring the health of your own websites and infrastructure. This includes infrastructure metrics like memory usage and requests per minute along with application level health such as appdex scores and latency. Of course, if you’re consuming an API that’s running in someone else’s infrastructure, you can’t just ask your third-party providers to install an APM agent that you have access to. This means you need a way to monitor the third-party APIs indirectly or via some other instrumentation methodology.

#monitoring #api integration #api monitoring #monitoring and alerting #monitoring strategies #monitoring tools #api integrations #monitoring microservices