How to Send Emails with Python

As a learning exercise, I recently dug into Python 3 to see how I could fire off a bunch of emails. There may be more straightforward methods of doing this in a production environment, but the following worked well for me.

So, here’s a scenario: You have the names and email addresses of a bunch of contacts. And you want to send a message to each one of those contacts, while adding a “Dear [name]” at the top of the message.

For simplicity’s sake you can store the contact details in a file rather than a database. You can also store the template of the message you wish to send in a file.

The smtplib module of Python is basically all you need to send simple emails, without any subject line or such additional information. But for real emails, you do need a subject line and lots of information — maybe even pictures and attachments.

This is where Python’s email package comes in. Keep in mind that it’s not possible to send an email message using the email package alone. You need a combination of both email and smtplib.

Be sure to check out the comprehensive official documentation for both of these.

Here are four basic steps for sending emails using Python:

  1. Set up the SMTP server and log into your account.
  2. Create the MIMEMultipart message object and load it with appropriate headers for From, To, and Subject fields.
  3. Add your message body.
  4. Send the message using the SMTP server object.

Now let me walk you through the whole process.

Let’s say you have a contacts file mycontacts.txt as follows:

user@computer ~ $ cat mycontacts.txt
john johndoe@example.com
katie katie2016@example.com

Each line represents a single contact. We have the name followed by the email address. I’m storing everything in lowercase. I’ll leave it to the programming logic to convert any fields to upper-case or sentence-case if necessary. All of that is pretty easy in Python.

Next, we have the message template file message.txt.

user@computer ~ $ cat message.txt 

Dear ${PERSON_NAME}, 

This is a test message. 
Have a great weekend! 

Yours Truly

Notice the word “${PERSON_NAME}”? That is a template string in Python. Template strings can easily be replaced with other strings; in this example, ${PERSON_NAME} is going to be replaced with the actual name of the person, as you’ll see shortly.

Now let’s start with the Python code. First up, we need to read the contacts from the mycontacts.txt file. We might as well generalize this bit into its own function.

# Function to read the contacts from a given contact file and return a
# list of names and email addresses
def get_contacts(filename):
    names = []
    emails = []
    with open(filename, mode='r', encoding='utf-8') as contacts_file:
        for a_contact in contacts_file:
            names.append(a_contact.split()[0])
            emails.append(a_contact.split()[1])
    return names, emails

The function get_contacts() takes a filename as its argument. It will open the file, read each line (i.e., each contact), split it into name and email, and then append them into two separate lists. Finally, the two lists are returned from the function.

We also need a function to read in a template file (like message.txt) and return a Template object made from its contents.

from string import Template

def read_template(filename):
    with open(filename, 'r', encoding='utf-8') as template_file:
        template_file_content = template_file.read()
    return Template(template_file_content)

Just like the previous function, this one takes a filename as its argument.

To send the email, you need to make use of SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol). As mentioned earlier, Python provides libraries to handle this task.

# import the smtplib module. It should be included in Python by default
import smtplib
# set up the SMTP server
s = smtplib.SMTP(host='your_host_address_here', port=your_port_here)
s.starttls()
s.login(MY_ADDRESS, PASSWORD)

In the above code snippet, you’re importing the smtplib and then creating an SMTP instance that encapsulates an SMTP connection. It takes as parameter the host address and a port number, both of which entirely depends on the SMPT settings of your particular email service provider. For instance, in the case of Outlook, line 4 above would instead be:

s = smtplib.SMTP(host='smtp-mail.outlook.com', port=587)

You should use the host address and port number of your particular email service provider for the whole thing to work.

MY_ADDRESS and PASSWORD above are two variables that holds the full email address and password of the account you’re going to use.

Now would be a good time to fetch the contact information and the message templates using the functions we defined above.

names, emails = get_contacts('mycontacts.txt')  # read contacts
message_template = read_template('message.txt')

Now, for each of those contacts, let’s send the mail separately.

# import necessary packages
from email.mime.multipart import MIMEMultipart
from email.mime.text import MIMEText

# For each contact, send the email:
for name, email in zip(names, emails):
    msg = MIMEMultipart()       # create a message

    # add in the actual person name to the message template
    message = message_template.substitute(PERSON_NAME=name.title())

    # setup the parameters of the message
    msg['From']=MY_ADDRESS
    msg['To']=email
    msg['Subject']="This is TEST"

    # add in the message body
    msg.attach(MIMEText(message, 'plain'))

    # send the message via the server set up earlier.
    s.send_message(msg)
    
    del msg

For each name and email (from the contacts file), you’re creating a MIMEMultipart object, setting up the From, To, Subject content-type headers as a keyword dictionary, and then attaching the message body to the MIMEMultipart object as plain text. You might want to read the documentation to find out more about other MIME types you can experiment with.

Also note that on line 10 above, I’m replacing ${PERSON_NAME} with the actual name extracted from the contacts file using the templating mechanism in Python.

In this particular example I’m deleting the MIMEMultipart object and re-creating it each time you iterate through the loop.

Once that is done, you can send the message using the handy send_message() function of the SMTP object you created earlier.

Here’s the full code:

import smtplib

from string import Template

from email.mime.multipart import MIMEMultipart
from email.mime.text import MIMEText

MY_ADDRESS = 'my_address@example.comm'
PASSWORD = 'mypassword'

def get_contacts(filename):
    """
    Return two lists names, emails containing names and email addresses
    read from a file specified by filename.
    """
    
    names = []
    emails = []
    with open(filename, mode='r', encoding='utf-8') as contacts_file:
        for a_contact in contacts_file:
            names.append(a_contact.split()[0])
            emails.append(a_contact.split()[1])
    return names, emails

def read_template(filename):
    """
    Returns a Template object comprising the contents of the 
    file specified by filename.
    """
    
    with open(filename, 'r', encoding='utf-8') as template_file:
        template_file_content = template_file.read()
    return Template(template_file_content)

def main():
    names, emails = get_contacts('mycontacts.txt') # read contacts
    message_template = read_template('message.txt')

    # set up the SMTP server
    s = smtplib.SMTP(host='your_host_address_here', port=your_port_here)
    s.starttls()
    s.login(MY_ADDRESS, PASSWORD)

    # For each contact, send the email:
    for name, email in zip(names, emails):
        msg = MIMEMultipart()       # create a message

        # add in the actual person name to the message template
        message = message_template.substitute(PERSON_NAME=name.title())

        # Prints out the message body for our sake
        print(message)

        # setup the parameters of the message
        msg['From']=MY_ADDRESS
        msg['To']=email
        msg['Subject']="This is TEST"
        
        # add in the message body
        msg.attach(MIMEText(message, 'plain'))
        
        # send the message via the server set up earlier.
        s.send_message(msg)
        del msg
        
    # Terminate the SMTP session and close the connection
    s.quit()
    
if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

There you go! I believe the code is now fairly clear.

Feel free to copy and tweak it as necessary.

Apart from the official Python docs, I would also like to mention this resource which helped me a lot.

Happy coding :)

#python #webdevelopment #webdev 

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How to Send Emails with Python
Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1619510796

Lambda, Map, Filter functions in python

Welcome to my Blog, In this article, we will learn python lambda function, Map function, and filter function.

Lambda function in python: Lambda is a one line anonymous function and lambda takes any number of arguments but can only have one expression and python lambda syntax is

Syntax: x = lambda arguments : expression

Now i will show you some python lambda function examples:

#python #anonymous function python #filter function in python #lambda #lambda python 3 #map python #python filter #python filter lambda #python lambda #python lambda examples #python map

Ayan Code

1656193861

Simple Login Page in HTML and CSS | Source Code

Hello guys, Today in this post we’ll learn How to Create a Simple Login Page with a fantastic design. To create it we are going to use pure CSS and HTML. Hope you enjoy this post.

A login page is one of the most important component of a website or app that allows authorized users to access an entire site or a part of a website. You would have already seen them when visiting a website. Let's head to create it.

Whether it’s a signup or login page, it should be catchy, user-friendly and easy to use. These types of Forms lead to increased sales, lead generation, and customer growth.


Demo

Click to watch demo!

Simple Login Page HTML CSS (source code)

<!DOCTYPE html>
  <html lang="en" >
  <head>
    <meta charset="UTF-8">
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/normalize/5.0.0/normalize.min.css">
  <link rel="stylesheet" href="styledfer.css">
  </head>

  <body>
   <div id="login-form-wrap">
    <h2>Login</h2>
    <form id="login-form">
      <p>
      <input type="email" id="email" name="email" placeholder="Email " required><i class="validation"><span></span><span></span></i>
      </p>
      <p>
      <input type="password" id="password" name="password" placeholder="Password" required><i class="validation"><span></span><span></span></i>
      </p>
      <p>
      <input type="submit" id="login" value="Login">
      </p>

      </form>
    <div id="create-account-wrap">
      <p>Don't have an accout? <a href="#">Create One</a><p>
    </div>
   </div>
    
  <script src='https://code.jquery.com/jquery-2.2.4.min.js'></script>
  <script src='https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery-validate/1.15.0/jquery.validate.min.js'></script>
  </body>
</html>

CSS CODE

body {
  background-color: #020202;
  font-size: 1.6rem;
  font-family: "Open Sans", sans-serif;
  color: #2b3e51;
}
h2 {
  font-weight: 300;
  text-align: center;
}
p {
  position: relative;
}
a,
a:link,
a:visited,
a:active {
  color: #ff9100;
  -webkit-transition: all 0.2s ease;
  transition: all 0.2s ease;
}
a:focus, a:hover,
a:link:focus,
a:link:hover,
a:visited:focus,
a:visited:hover,
a:active:focus,
a:active:hover {
  color: #ff9f22;
  -webkit-transition: all 0.2s ease;
  transition: all 0.2s ease;
}
#login-form-wrap {
  background-color: #fff;
  width: 16em;
  margin: 30px auto;
  text-align: center;
  padding: 20px 0 0 0;
  border-radius: 4px;
  box-shadow: 0px 30px 50px 0px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2);
}
#login-form {
  padding: 0 60px;
}
input {
  display: block;
  box-sizing: border-box;
  width: 100%;
  outline: none;
  height: 60px;
  line-height: 60px;
  border-radius: 4px;
}
#email,
#password {
  width: 100%;
  padding: 0 0 0 10px;
  margin: 0;
  color: #8a8b8e;
  border: 1px solid #c2c0ca;
  font-style: normal;
  font-size: 16px;
  -webkit-appearance: none;
     -moz-appearance: none;
          appearance: none;
  position: relative;
  display: inline-block;
  background: none;
}
#email:focus,
#password:focus {
  border-color: #3ca9e2;
}
#email:focus:invalid,
#password:focus:invalid {
  color: #cc1e2b;
  border-color: #cc1e2b;
}
#email:valid ~ .validation,
#password:valid ~ .validation 
{
  display: block;
  border-color: #0C0;
}
#email:valid ~ .validation span,
#password:valid ~ .validation span{
  background: #0C0;
  position: absolute;
  border-radius: 6px;
}
#email:valid ~ .validation span:first-child,
#password:valid ~ .validation span:first-child{
  top: 30px;
  left: 14px;
  width: 20px;
  height: 3px;
  -webkit-transform: rotate(-45deg);
          transform: rotate(-45deg);
}
#email:valid ~ .validation span:last-child
#password:valid ~ .validation span:last-child
{
  top: 35px;
  left: 8px;
  width: 11px;
  height: 3px;
  -webkit-transform: rotate(45deg);
          transform: rotate(45deg);
}
.validation {
  display: none;
  position: absolute;
  content: " ";
  height: 60px;
  width: 30px;
  right: 15px;
  top: 0px;
}
input[type="submit"] {
  border: none;
  display: block;
  background-color: #ff9100;
  color: #fff;
  font-weight: bold;
  text-transform: uppercase;
  cursor: pointer;
  -webkit-transition: all 0.2s ease;
  transition: all 0.2s ease;
  font-size: 18px;
  position: relative;
  display: inline-block;
  cursor: pointer;
  text-align: center;
}
input[type="submit"]:hover {
  background-color: #ff9b17;
  -webkit-transition: all 0.2s ease;
  transition: all 0.2s ease;
}

#create-account-wrap {
  background-color: #eeedf1;
  color: #8a8b8e;
  font-size: 14px;
  width: 100%;
  padding: 10px 0;
  border-radius: 0 0 4px 4px;
}

Congratulations! You have now successfully created our Simple Login Page in HTML and CSS.

My Website: codewithayan, see this to checkout all of my amazing Tutorials.

August  Larson

August Larson

1624979400

Send emails through Python

You will be surprised how easy is to configure your account and send emails with attachments in Python

You cannot imagine how easy and simple it is to configure your email account to be able to send emails to one or several contacts directly from your Python environment without any effort or complicated code.

In this article, I will walk you through the process. All you need is a Gmail account and your Python running and ready to go. Let me show you how it’s done.

#email #python #programming #automation #send-email #send emails through python

Shardul Bhatt

Shardul Bhatt

1626775355

Why use Python for Software Development

No programming language is pretty much as diverse as Python. It enables building cutting edge applications effortlessly. Developers are as yet investigating the full capability of end-to-end Python development services in various areas. 

By areas, we mean FinTech, HealthTech, InsureTech, Cybersecurity, and that's just the beginning. These are New Economy areas, and Python has the ability to serve every one of them. The vast majority of them require massive computational abilities. Python's code is dynamic and powerful - equipped for taking care of the heavy traffic and substantial algorithmic capacities. 

Programming advancement is multidimensional today. Endeavor programming requires an intelligent application with AI and ML capacities. Shopper based applications require information examination to convey a superior client experience. Netflix, Trello, and Amazon are genuine instances of such applications. Python assists with building them effortlessly. 

5 Reasons to Utilize Python for Programming Web Apps 

Python can do such numerous things that developers can't discover enough reasons to admire it. Python application development isn't restricted to web and enterprise applications. It is exceptionally adaptable and superb for a wide range of uses.

Robust frameworks 

Python is known for its tools and frameworks. There's a structure for everything. Django is helpful for building web applications, venture applications, logical applications, and mathematical processing. Flask is another web improvement framework with no conditions. 

Web2Py, CherryPy, and Falcon offer incredible capabilities to customize Python development services. A large portion of them are open-source frameworks that allow quick turn of events. 

Simple to read and compose 

Python has an improved sentence structure - one that is like the English language. New engineers for Python can undoubtedly understand where they stand in the development process. The simplicity of composing allows quick application building. 

The motivation behind building Python, as said by its maker Guido Van Rossum, was to empower even beginner engineers to comprehend the programming language. The simple coding likewise permits developers to roll out speedy improvements without getting confused by pointless subtleties. 

Utilized by the best 

Alright - Python isn't simply one more programming language. It should have something, which is the reason the business giants use it. Furthermore, that too for different purposes. Developers at Google use Python to assemble framework organization systems, parallel information pusher, code audit, testing and QA, and substantially more. Netflix utilizes Python web development services for its recommendation algorithm and media player. 

Massive community support 

Python has a steadily developing community that offers enormous help. From amateurs to specialists, there's everybody. There are a lot of instructional exercises, documentation, and guides accessible for Python web development solutions. 

Today, numerous universities start with Python, adding to the quantity of individuals in the community. Frequently, Python designers team up on various tasks and help each other with algorithmic, utilitarian, and application critical thinking. 

Progressive applications 

Python is the greatest supporter of data science, Machine Learning, and Artificial Intelligence at any enterprise software development company. Its utilization cases in cutting edge applications are the most compelling motivation for its prosperity. Python is the second most well known tool after R for data analytics.

The simplicity of getting sorted out, overseeing, and visualizing information through unique libraries makes it ideal for data based applications. TensorFlow for neural networks and OpenCV for computer vision are two of Python's most well known use cases for Machine learning applications.

Summary

Thinking about the advances in programming and innovation, Python is a YES for an assorted scope of utilizations. Game development, web application development services, GUI advancement, ML and AI improvement, Enterprise and customer applications - every one of them uses Python to its full potential. 

The disadvantages of Python web improvement arrangements are regularly disregarded by developers and organizations because of the advantages it gives. They focus on quality over speed and performance over blunders. That is the reason it's a good idea to utilize Python for building the applications of the future.

#python development services #python development company #python app development #python development #python in web development #python software development

Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1623043440

How to Send Emails through Gmail in Python?

Sending a bulk of emails manually is a tedious task. You can use third-party services to send the emails in bulk at a time.

How about you create your own customized script to send emails?

Isn’t it wonderful?

Yeah, it is. We are going to write a script in Python to send emails.

Python has a library called smtplib which is used to send emails. The library smtplib is based on the SMTP (Simple Mail Transport Protocol). SMTP is used to send emails to others.

Setup Gmail

Steps to Send Mail

HTML Content

Adding Attachments

Adding Attachments

Conclusion

#development #python #send mail #python's #send emails