Devil  Moya

Devil Moya

1563503003

Building a Reddit Scraper with React and JavaScript: Composing Messages

Today let’s talk about composing and sending messages via the Reddit API using JavaScript and React (is that good SEO?).

This requires that the user has said “ok” to you using their account, in fact, the majority of what I’m talking about is based off that.

So let’s assume they said “ok” and you’ve set up your form and all we need to do is access that info and send a message with the API.

The context of this post will be in our confirm message component. This is the part where we have selected our posts and are ready to send our messages.

Creating Our Submit Handler

The link we will be making our post call to, is:

https://oauth.reddit.com/api/compose

Because we originally authenticated using the OAuth method, we need to make calls to the OAuth subdomain endpoint api/compose.

The tricky part was that you can’t just send a post body request like normal, but instead we have to create some FormData. This is the way I ended up getting it to work, maybe there’s a better way!

Let’s pick apart the function.

export const sendMessageToAuthors = async (author, subject, message, removeMessagedAuthor) => {
  const tokens = await fetchTokens().catch(err => false);
  const fmtSubject = subject;
  const link = `https://oauth.reddit.com/api/compose`;

  if (!tokens || !author) return toast.error("Something went wrong");
  if (!message ) return toast.error("A messaged is needed to send");
  if ( !fmtSubject ) return toast.error("A subject is needed");
}

The reason why I stored my tokens for Reddit in the database was because I can now fetch them whenever and wherever I need them. I thought what might happen if local storage got cleared, or this or that. Atleast I know these tokens are always up to date because whenever the app is loaded, the app takes the refresh_token in the database, asks Reddit for a new access_token, then saves it to the user by passing the JWT token saved in localstorage, to the database.

So, we call that function to get our tokens which we will use to handshake with Reddit, which is to say, we will use it to show Reddit we are authenticated.

Because the ability to send messages is a power that requires great responsibility, the checks have to be on point. If anything is missing, we return, if anything is falsey, we return. This will prevent situations where perhaps we send a message and the title is undefined.

Formatting Our FormData

The next portion of the function, which will be added below our validation checks, is:

  const body = new FormData();
  body.set('to', `/u/${author}`);
  body.set("subject", fmtSubject);
  body.set("text", message);
  await Axios.post(link, body, {
    headers: {
      "Authorization": `bearer ${tokens.access_token}`,
      "Content-Type": "application/x-www-form-urlencoded"
    }
  })
  .then(res => {
    toast.success(`Message sent to ${author}`)
    removeMessagedAuthor();
  })
  .catch(console.log);

If any of our variables are empty, we immediately return and run away.

Otherwise, we start setting our form data. Your username is technically a “subreddit” according to the Reddit API, I was confused by that. That’s why we need /u/ before our actual author’s name. I’m assuming it stands for a user’s endpoint, but is referred to as a subreddit in the docs.

Instead of doing the encryption we did before, in the original request to get our tokens, we instead include our access_token as the bearer token. The x-www-form-urlencoded portion is also very important.

Why you ask? Because it sends our author, subject, and message as key/value pairs separated by & for each pair, and assigned using =. More info on MDN

It’s just another way to tell the server what type of data we are sending; what the structure is.

The toast is just sending a notification and removing the author is just a personal touch from me. What it does, is it automatically removes the author you sent a message to, from the list of total selected messages. This is useful for rapidly sending messages. Whereas before you’d send a message, click next, send, next etc., now it’ll automatically go to the next one ultimately by resetting the index to 0 (more on that later).

Save Our Author to the Database

Just in case you’re interested. For our Reddit scraper in this particular use case, I save the author to the database because our app will automatically choose between two different saved messages that I’ll show you about once we get to the account page.

export const saveAuthorToDb = async (author, postId)=> {
  const token = window.localStorage.getItem("token");
  await Axios.post(`${process.env.REACT_APP_BACKEND}/api/profile/saveAuthors`, {
    author,
    postId
  }, {
    headers: {
      token
    }
  })
  .then()
  .catch(console.log);
}

We send the name of the author to our backend and save it. Then, when we retrieve it, we can cross reference with the author of the currently displayed author and go from there.

const messageHandler = () => {
    let authorExists = false;

    userProfile.authorsMessaged.map(x => x === data.author ? authorExists = true : null);

    if ( authorExists ) {
      setDefaultMessage(userProfile.altMessage);
    } else {
      setDefaultMessage(userProfile.defaultMessage);
    }
  }

Handling Our Component State

  const [ defaultMessage, setDefaultMessage ] = useState("");
  const [ subject, setSubject ] = useState("");
  const [ redditProfile, setRedditProfile ] = useState({});

  useEffect(() => {
    setSubject(data.title);
    const profile = JSON.parse(window.localStorage.getItem("reddit_profile"));

    setRedditProfile({...profile});
  }, [data.title]);

  useEffect(() => {
    messageHandler();
  }, [data]);

The reason why I did the state this way, is because if you need to make an adjustment to the current title, or message body, you can, and it won’t affect the next post. It becomes prefilled with the message you’ve created, or, you can add you’re own.

The useEffect’s are just updating our state when the app mounts and when either data or data.title changes (you can reference the messageHandler function in the prior snippet).

That’s about it! Just build out the UI as you’d like, and this info will helpfully get you going with sending messages!

At the time of writing, I don’t have a loader on the button. I’d recommend this. When someone sends a messages, a loader should replace the button. This, to me, is just good UX and by getting rid of the button, it can prevent spamming.

I hope you enjoyed this post, now go make yourself an awesome Reddit scraper using JavaScript and React (more SEO, I think).

#react-native #reactjs #javascript #api #web-development

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Building a Reddit Scraper with React and JavaScript: Composing Messages
Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1598839687

How native is React Native? | React Native vs Native App Development

If you are undertaking a mobile app development for your start-up or enterprise, you are likely wondering whether to use React Native. As a popular development framework, React Native helps you to develop near-native mobile apps. However, you are probably also wondering how close you can get to a native app by using React Native. How native is React Native?

In the article, we discuss the similarities between native mobile development and development using React Native. We also touch upon where they differ and how to bridge the gaps. Read on.

A brief introduction to React Native

Let’s briefly set the context first. We will briefly touch upon what React Native is and how it differs from earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is a popular JavaScript framework that Facebook has created. You can use this open-source framework to code natively rendering Android and iOS mobile apps. You can use it to develop web apps too.

Facebook has developed React Native based on React, its JavaScript library. The first release of React Native came in March 2015. At the time of writing this article, the latest stable release of React Native is 0.62.0, and it was released in March 2020.

Although relatively new, React Native has acquired a high degree of popularity. The “Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2019” report identifies it as the 8th most loved framework. Facebook, Walmart, and Bloomberg are some of the top companies that use React Native.

The popularity of React Native comes from its advantages. Some of its advantages are as follows:

  • Performance: It delivers optimal performance.
  • Cross-platform development: You can develop both Android and iOS apps with it. The reuse of code expedites development and reduces costs.
  • UI design: React Native enables you to design simple and responsive UI for your mobile app.
  • 3rd party plugins: This framework supports 3rd party plugins.
  • Developer community: A vibrant community of developers support React Native.

Why React Native is fundamentally different from earlier hybrid frameworks

Are you wondering whether React Native is just another of those hybrid frameworks like Ionic or Cordova? It’s not! React Native is fundamentally different from these earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is very close to native. Consider the following aspects as described on the React Native website:

  • Access to many native platforms features: The primitives of React Native render to native platform UI. This means that your React Native app will use many native platform APIs as native apps would do.
  • Near-native user experience: React Native provides several native components, and these are platform agnostic.
  • The ease of accessing native APIs: React Native uses a declarative UI paradigm. This enables React Native to interact easily with native platform APIs since React Native wraps existing native code.

Due to these factors, React Native offers many more advantages compared to those earlier hybrid frameworks. We now review them.

#android app #frontend #ios app #mobile app development #benefits of react native #is react native good for mobile app development #native vs #pros and cons of react native #react mobile development #react native development #react native experience #react native framework #react native ios vs android #react native pros and cons #react native vs android #react native vs native #react native vs native performance #react vs native #why react native #why use react native

Xander  Crooks

Xander Crooks

1661082420

Himalayausa Clone using React JS and Redux

Inspired from Himalayausa.com

Project-code: closed-birthday-4512

Tech Stack Used

#React.js

#Redux

#Chakra-UI

#React Slick

#JavaScript

#HTML

#CSS

#Heroku

#Versel

#NPM

Deploy link:- Versal

This website was originally inspired from Himalayausa.com Our Team made Tremendus efforts and build this website within 5 consicutive days. We used React.js library for the UI part and used REDUX store for maintaing the states of the components. We used Heroku server API for getting the Mock Data and used Versel to deploy.

sneak peeks of the project...

Landing page...

Alt text

Shop By Category ...

Alt text

Best Seller ...

Alt text

Navbar ...

Alt text

Footer ...

Alt text

About Page ...

Alt text

Login page ...

Alt text

Signup page ...

Alt text

product page ...

Alt text

Single Product ...

Alt text

Cart page ...

Alt text

Checkout page ...

Alt text

Main Contributors

#Anurag Dinkar Pawar GitHub

#Veena Sahu GitHub

#Narayan Chatalwar GitHub

#SHILAJIT PAUL GitHub

#Govind Lakhotiya GitHub


Author: AnuragPawar-132
Source code: https://github.com/AnuragPawar-132/closed-birthday-4512

#react #javascript #Redux 

Franz  Becker

Franz Becker

1651604400

React Starter Kit: Build Web Apps with React, Relay and GraphQL.

React Starter Kit — "isomorphic" web app boilerplate   

React Starter Kit is an opinionated boilerplate for web development built on top of Node.js, Express, GraphQL and React, containing modern web development tools such as Webpack, Babel and Browsersync. Helping you to stay productive following the best practices. A solid starting point for both professionals and newcomers to the industry.

See getting started guide, demo, docs, roadmap  |  Join #react-starter-kit chat room on Gitter  |  Visit our sponsors:

 

Hiring

Getting Started

Customization

The master branch of React Starter Kit doesn't include a Flux implementation or any other advanced integrations. Nevertheless, we have some integrations available to you in feature branches that you can use either as a reference or merge into your project:

You can see status of most reasonable merge combination as PRs labeled as TRACKING

If you think that any of these features should be on master, or vice versa, some features should removed from the master branch, please let us know. We love your feedback!

Comparison

 

React Starter Kit

React Static Boilerplate

ASP.NET Core Starter Kit

App typeIsomorphic (universal)Single-page applicationSingle-page application
Frontend
LanguageJavaScript (ES2015+, JSX)JavaScript (ES2015+, JSX)JavaScript (ES2015+, JSX)
LibrariesReact, History, Universal RouterReact, History, ReduxReact, History, Redux
RoutesImperative (functional)DeclarativeDeclarative, cross-stack
Backend
LanguageJavaScript (ES2015+, JSX)n/aC#, F#
LibrariesNode.js, Express, Sequelize,
GraphQL
n/aASP.NET Core, EF Core,
ASP.NET Identity
SSRYesn/an/a
Data APIGraphQLn/aWeb API

Backers

♥ React Starter Kit? Help us keep it alive by donating funds to cover project expenses via OpenCollective or Bountysource!

lehneres Tarkan Anlar Morten Olsen Adam David Ernst Zane Hitchcox  

How to Contribute

Anyone and everyone is welcome to contribute to this project. The best way to start is by checking our open issues, submit a new issue or feature request, participate in discussions, upvote or downvote the issues you like or dislike, send pull requests.

Learn More

Related Projects

  • GraphQL Starter Kit — Boilerplate for building data APIs with Node.js, JavaScript (via Babel) and GraphQL
  • Membership Database — SQL schema boilerplate for user accounts, profiles, roles, and auth claims
  • Babel Starter Kit — Boilerplate for authoring JavaScript/React.js libraries

Support

License

Copyright © 2014-present Kriasoft, LLC. This source code is licensed under the MIT license found in the LICENSE.txt file. The documentation to the project is licensed under the CC BY-SA 4.0 license.


Author: kriasoft
Source Code: https://github.com/kriasoft/react-starter-kit
License: MIT License

#graphql #react 

Devil  Moya

Devil Moya

1563503003

Building a Reddit Scraper with React and JavaScript: Composing Messages

Today let’s talk about composing and sending messages via the Reddit API using JavaScript and React (is that good SEO?).

This requires that the user has said “ok” to you using their account, in fact, the majority of what I’m talking about is based off that.

So let’s assume they said “ok” and you’ve set up your form and all we need to do is access that info and send a message with the API.

The context of this post will be in our confirm message component. This is the part where we have selected our posts and are ready to send our messages.

Creating Our Submit Handler

The link we will be making our post call to, is:

https://oauth.reddit.com/api/compose

Because we originally authenticated using the OAuth method, we need to make calls to the OAuth subdomain endpoint api/compose.

The tricky part was that you can’t just send a post body request like normal, but instead we have to create some FormData. This is the way I ended up getting it to work, maybe there’s a better way!

Let’s pick apart the function.

export const sendMessageToAuthors = async (author, subject, message, removeMessagedAuthor) => {
  const tokens = await fetchTokens().catch(err => false);
  const fmtSubject = subject;
  const link = `https://oauth.reddit.com/api/compose`;

  if (!tokens || !author) return toast.error("Something went wrong");
  if (!message ) return toast.error("A messaged is needed to send");
  if ( !fmtSubject ) return toast.error("A subject is needed");
}

The reason why I stored my tokens for Reddit in the database was because I can now fetch them whenever and wherever I need them. I thought what might happen if local storage got cleared, or this or that. Atleast I know these tokens are always up to date because whenever the app is loaded, the app takes the refresh_token in the database, asks Reddit for a new access_token, then saves it to the user by passing the JWT token saved in localstorage, to the database.

So, we call that function to get our tokens which we will use to handshake with Reddit, which is to say, we will use it to show Reddit we are authenticated.

Because the ability to send messages is a power that requires great responsibility, the checks have to be on point. If anything is missing, we return, if anything is falsey, we return. This will prevent situations where perhaps we send a message and the title is undefined.

Formatting Our FormData

The next portion of the function, which will be added below our validation checks, is:

  const body = new FormData();
  body.set('to', `/u/${author}`);
  body.set("subject", fmtSubject);
  body.set("text", message);
  await Axios.post(link, body, {
    headers: {
      "Authorization": `bearer ${tokens.access_token}`,
      "Content-Type": "application/x-www-form-urlencoded"
    }
  })
  .then(res => {
    toast.success(`Message sent to ${author}`)
    removeMessagedAuthor();
  })
  .catch(console.log);

If any of our variables are empty, we immediately return and run away.

Otherwise, we start setting our form data. Your username is technically a “subreddit” according to the Reddit API, I was confused by that. That’s why we need /u/ before our actual author’s name. I’m assuming it stands for a user’s endpoint, but is referred to as a subreddit in the docs.

Instead of doing the encryption we did before, in the original request to get our tokens, we instead include our access_token as the bearer token. The x-www-form-urlencoded portion is also very important.

Why you ask? Because it sends our author, subject, and message as key/value pairs separated by & for each pair, and assigned using =. More info on MDN

It’s just another way to tell the server what type of data we are sending; what the structure is.

The toast is just sending a notification and removing the author is just a personal touch from me. What it does, is it automatically removes the author you sent a message to, from the list of total selected messages. This is useful for rapidly sending messages. Whereas before you’d send a message, click next, send, next etc., now it’ll automatically go to the next one ultimately by resetting the index to 0 (more on that later).

Save Our Author to the Database

Just in case you’re interested. For our Reddit scraper in this particular use case, I save the author to the database because our app will automatically choose between two different saved messages that I’ll show you about once we get to the account page.

export const saveAuthorToDb = async (author, postId)=> {
  const token = window.localStorage.getItem("token");
  await Axios.post(`${process.env.REACT_APP_BACKEND}/api/profile/saveAuthors`, {
    author,
    postId
  }, {
    headers: {
      token
    }
  })
  .then()
  .catch(console.log);
}

We send the name of the author to our backend and save it. Then, when we retrieve it, we can cross reference with the author of the currently displayed author and go from there.

const messageHandler = () => {
    let authorExists = false;

    userProfile.authorsMessaged.map(x => x === data.author ? authorExists = true : null);

    if ( authorExists ) {
      setDefaultMessage(userProfile.altMessage);
    } else {
      setDefaultMessage(userProfile.defaultMessage);
    }
  }

Handling Our Component State

  const [ defaultMessage, setDefaultMessage ] = useState("");
  const [ subject, setSubject ] = useState("");
  const [ redditProfile, setRedditProfile ] = useState({});

  useEffect(() => {
    setSubject(data.title);
    const profile = JSON.parse(window.localStorage.getItem("reddit_profile"));

    setRedditProfile({...profile});
  }, [data.title]);

  useEffect(() => {
    messageHandler();
  }, [data]);

The reason why I did the state this way, is because if you need to make an adjustment to the current title, or message body, you can, and it won’t affect the next post. It becomes prefilled with the message you’ve created, or, you can add you’re own.

The useEffect’s are just updating our state when the app mounts and when either data or data.title changes (you can reference the messageHandler function in the prior snippet).

That’s about it! Just build out the UI as you’d like, and this info will helpfully get you going with sending messages!

At the time of writing, I don’t have a loader on the button. I’d recommend this. When someone sends a messages, a loader should replace the button. This, to me, is just good UX and by getting rid of the button, it can prevent spamming.

I hope you enjoyed this post, now go make yourself an awesome Reddit scraper using JavaScript and React (more SEO, I think).

#react-native #reactjs #javascript #api #web-development

Aubrey  Price

Aubrey Price

1589722410

Build a simple React Native Pokemon app with React-Navigation

As we start learning new technologies we want to start building something or work on a simple project to get a better understanding of the technology. So, let’s build this simple app.
For this app, we will be using PokeApi to get our pokemon data, and also we will be using Hooks. I am using pokemondb for pokemon sprites. It’s just a personal preference you can use whatever you want.

#react-native #react-native-app #react-navigation #react-native-development #react