Connor Mills

Connor Mills

1551238935

break out of for loop when it iterates over 4th even number

public static void main(String[] args) {
        for (int i=1; i<=10; i++) {


            if (i%2==0) {
                System.out.println("My Name is Nikki\r\n" + `enter code here`I am learning Core Java");
            }
            break;
//          else {
//              System.out.println("My name is U\r\n" + `enter code here`
// I am learning core java");
//          }

        }


    }

}


#java #loops

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Zak Dyer

1551242479

this is a solution

 public static void main(String[] args) {
    int count = 0;
    for (int i=1; i<=10; i++) {
        if (i%2==0) {
            System.out.println("My Name is Nikki\r\nI am learning Core Java");
            count++;
        }
        if (count == 4) {
            break;
        }
    }
}

Elthel Mario

1551252022

First Solution (counter variable):

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int counter = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        if (i%2==0) {
            System.out.println("My Name is Nikki\r\n" + `enter code here`I am learning Core Java");
            counter++;
        }
        if (counter == 4){
            break;
        }
    }
}

Alternatively, you can just loop from 0 to 8 incrementing by 2. Here’s the code to do that:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int counter = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < 8; i += 2) {
        if (i%2==0) {
            System.out.println("My Name is Nikki\r\n" + `enter code here`I am learning Core Java");
        }
    }
}

Ida  Nader

Ida Nader

1599099600

How to Use If-Else Statements and Loops in R – Dataquest

When we’re programming in R (or any other language, for that matter), we often want to control when and how particular parts of our code are executed. We can do that using control structures like if-else statements, for loops, and while loops.

Control structures are blocks of code that determine how other sections of code are executed based on specified parameters. You can think of these as a bit like the instructions a parent might give a child before leaving the house:

“If I’m not home by 8pm, make yourself dinner.”

Control structures set a condition and tell R what to do when that condition is met or not met. And unlike some kids, R will always do what we tell it to! You can learn more about control structures in the R documentation if you would like.

In this tutorial, we assume you’re familiar with basic data structures, and arithmetic operations in R.

Not quite there yet? Check out our Introductory R Programming course that’s part of our Data Analyst in R path. It’s free to start learning, there are no prerequisites, and there’s nothing to install — you can start learning in your browser right now.

install.packages(“Dataquest”)

Start learning R today with our Introduction to R course — no credit card required!

SIGN UP

(This tutorial is based on our intermediate R programming course, so check that out as well! It’s interactive and will allow you to write and run code right in your browser.)

Comparison Operators in R

In order to use control structures, we need to create statements that will turn out to be either TRUE or FALSE. In the kids example above, the statement “It’s 8pm. Are my parents home yet?” yields TRUE (“Yes”) or FALSE (“No”). In R, the most fundamental way to evaluate something as TRUE or FALSE is through comparison operators.

Below are six essential comparison operators for working with control structures in R:

  • == means equality. The statement x == a framed as a question means “Does the value of x equal the value of a?”
  • != means “not equal”. The statement x == b means “Does the value of x not equal the value of b?”
  • < means “less than”. The statement x < c means “Is the value of x less than the value of c?”
  • <= means “less than or equal”. The statement x <= d means “Is the value of x less or equal to the value of d?”
  • > means “greater than”. The statement x > e means “Is the value of x greater than the value of e?”
  • >= means “greater than or equal”. The statement x >= f means “Is the value of xgreater than or equal to the value of f?”

#data science tutorials #beginner #for loop #for loops #if #if else #learn r #r #r tutorial #rstats #tutorial #tutorials #while loop #while loops

August  Larson

August Larson

1624331040

Python For Loop (with Examples)

A Python tutorial to understand the uses of for loop in various ways including examples.

Python is a general-purpose programming language, which emphasizes making programming easy, efficient coding, and unleashes the user’s potential. Loops are the vital part of programming as it allows the user to repetitive use a set of codes using loops. So in the following article, we will see how to use for loops in python.

FOR Loop:

Till the iteration of the last item in the sequence, for loop run the instructions. It iterates over sets of instructions in sequence, arrays, and a tuple for a pre-defined period or until the last item and calculation are executed.

For loop can be categorized in three ways.

  1. Traditional for loop – It is usually used in programming language and contains three parts of a loop, i.e., initialization, condition, increment/decrement.
  2. Iterator/collection-based for loop – It is used for the iteration of objects and collections instead of numbers.
  3. Vectorize for loop – It is used to iterate parallel arrays simultaneously.

#python #for loop #loops #loop #python for loop

Jaida  Kessler

Jaida Kessler

1589655240

Loops in Rust; Breaking From Nested Loops

Looping in Rust isn’t the same as standard C-style languages. The syntax is different and there are some powerful options that make looping easier. First, let’s go over some looping basics, then we will cover how to handle breaking and continuing in nested loops.

#rust #tutorial #loop #breaking #nested loops

Connor Mills

Connor Mills

1551238935

break out of for loop when it iterates over 4th even number

public static void main(String[] args) {
        for (int i=1; i<=10; i++) {


            if (i%2==0) {
                System.out.println("My Name is Nikki\r\n" + `enter code here`I am learning Core Java");
            }
            break;
//          else {
//              System.out.println("My name is U\r\n" + `enter code here`
// I am learning core java");
//          }

        }


    }

}


#java #loops

Monique  Larson

Monique Larson

1596104040

ES6 Deep Dive: Iterables & Iterators

Looping over data structures in JavaScript ES6

Today I am going to take a closer look at the new ways we can navigate data structures in the 6th edition of the ECMAScript standard — commonly referred to as ES6. Among all the upgrades and syntactical sugar added to JavaScript in 2015, there is also now support for iterators and iterable objects. These not only allow for less code when iterating over arrays and strings, but support new collections, like maps and sets, and the creation of custom objects and iterators for them. You could think of these as similar to (but not the same as) the looping that happens in a for-in loop on steroids.

Okay, you might be wondering, what even are iterators and iterable objects? An iterable is a sequential data structure that can be iterated over. Iterables can also have their own access method, which defines its iterator. This allows iterables to be publicly accessible. An iteratoris like a pointer that traverses the collection in a particular way. As we will get into in a bit, these new custom iterators in ES6 can loop through more than just a simple array.

This is a lot of jargon that I will break down in a few minutes with an example. But for starters, let’s take a look at the default use of ES6 iterators in the for-of loop.

The for-of loop

In ES5 and before, we’re used to seeing for and while loops to iterate over arrays or strings. Now, with ES6, we can hop around an array or a string without having to set the parameters for these loops. The for-of loop by default knows how to iterate over these data types sequentially:

#iterables #for-of-loop #iterators #javascript #es6