Continuous Integration with Docker

Continuous Integration with Docker

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Docker for the Absolute Beginners

Docker is an open platform for developers and sysadmins to build, ship, and run distributed applications, whether on laptops, data center VMs, or the cloud.

This course introduces Docker to an Absolute Beginner using really simple and easy to understand lectures. Lectures are followed by demos showing how to setup and get started with Docker. The coding exercises that accompany this course will help you practice Docker commands and developing your own images using Dockerfiles and practice Docker Compose. You will be developing Docker files for different use cases right in your browser. This way you don’t really need to have your own environment setup to get some hands on practice. The coding exercises will validate your commands and Dockerfiles and ensure you have written them correctly.

And finally we have assignments to put your skills to test. You will be given a challenge to solve using the skills you gained during this course. This is a great way to gain a real life project experience and work with the other students in the community to develop a Dockerfile and get feedback for your work. The assignment will push you to research and develop your own Docker images.

What are the requirements?

Basic System Administrator Skills
Good to have (Not Mandatory) access to a Linux System to setup Docker to follow along
What am I going to get from this course?

Beginner level introduction to Docker
Basic Docker Commands with Hands-On Exercises
Build Docker images using Dockerfiles with Hands-On Exercises
Understand what Docker Compose is
Build Application stack using Docker Compose Files with Hands-On Exercises
Understand what Docker Swarm is
What is the target audience?

System Administrators
Cloud Infrastructure Engineers
Developers

#docker #devops

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Continuous Integration with Docker
Iliana  Welch

Iliana Welch

1595249460

Docker Explained: Docker Architecture | Docker Registries

Following the second video about Docker basics, in this video, I explain Docker architecture and explain the different building blocks of the docker engine; docker client, API, Docker Daemon. I also explain what a docker registry is and I finish the video with a demo explaining and illustrating how to use Docker hub

In this video lesson you will learn:

  • What is Docker Host
  • What is Docker Engine
  • Learn about Docker Architecture
  • Learn about Docker client and Docker Daemon
  • Docker Hub and Registries
  • Simple demo to understand using images from registries

#docker #docker hub #docker host #docker engine #docker architecture #api

Integrating SonarQube with Jenkins

Welcome back to the second article in our #BacktoBasics series. As many of us already know, SonarQube is an open-source tool for continuous inspection of code quality. It performs static analysis of code, thus detecting bugs, code smells and security vulnerabilities. In addition, it also can report on the duplicate code, unit tests, code coverage and code complexities for multiple programming languages. Hence, in order to achieve Continuous Integration with fully automated code analysis, it is important to integrate SonarQube with CI tools such as Jenkins. Here, we are going to discuss integrating SonarQube with Jenkins to perform code analysis.

Running Jenkins and SonarQube on Docker

Enough on the introductions. Let’s jump into the configurations, shall we? First of all, let’s spin up Jenkins and SonarQube using Docker containers. Note that, we are going to use docker compose as it is an easy method to handle multiple services. Below is the content of the docker-compose.yml file which we are going to use.

docker-compose.yml file

version: '3'
services:
  sonarqube: 
    ports: 
      - '9000:9000' 
    volumes: 
      - 'E:\work\sonar\conf\:/opt/sonarqube/conf' 
      - 'E:\work\sonar\data\:/opt/sonarqube/data' 
      - 'E:\work\sonar\logs\:/opt/sonarqube/logs' 
      - 'E:\work\sonar\extensions\:/opt/sonarqube/extensions' 
    image: sonarqube
  jenkins:
    image: 'ravindranathbarathy/jenkins'
    volumes:
      - /var/run/docker.sock:/var/run/docker.sock
      - 'E:\work\jenkins_home\:/var/jenkins_home'  
    ports:
      - '8080:8080'
      - '5000:50000'
  jenkins-slave:
    container_name: jenkins-slave
    restart: always
    environment:
            - 'JENKINS_URL=http://jenkins:8080'
    image: kaviyakulothungan/jenkins-slave-node:v2
    volumes:
      - /var/run/docker.sock:/var/run/docker.sock
      - 'E:\work\jenkins_slave\:/home/jenkins'
    depends_on:
      - jenkins

docker-compose up is the command to run the docker-compose.yml file.

docker-compose command to spin up Jenkins and Sonarqube

Shell

1

docker-compose up

Note: The _docker-compose_ command must be run from folder where the _docker-compose.yml_ file is placed

This file, when run, will automatically host the Jenkins listening on port 8080 along with a slave.

Jenkins Hosted on Docker

Jenkins hosted using Docker

The SonarQube will be hosted listening on port 9000.

SonarQube hosted on Docker

SonarQube hosted using Docker

Configuring Jenkins for SonarQube Analysis

In order to run the SonarQube analysis in Jenkins, there are few things we have to take care before creating the Jenkins job. First of all, we need to install the**_ ‘_SonarQube Scanner” plugin. For this, let’s go to Jenkins -> Manage Jenkins -> Manage Plugins. There, navigate to “Available” view and look for the plugin “SonarQube Scanner”. Select the plugin and click on “Install without restart**” and wait for the plugin to be installed.

Installing SonarQube Scanner Plugin

Installing SonarQube Scanner Plugin

Once the plugin is installed, we need to configure a few things in the Jenkins global configuration page.

For that, let’s click on Jenkins -> Manage Jenkins -> Configure System -> SonarQube Servers and fill in the required details.

SonarQube Server Configuration

SonarQube Server Configuration

Here,

  • Name: Anything meaningful. Eg. sonarqube
  • Server URL:
  • Server Authentication TokenRefer below

To get the server authentication token, login to SonarQube and go to Administration -> Security -> Users and then click on Tokens. There, Enter a Token name and click on Generate and copy the token value and paste it in the Jenkins field and then click on “Done”.

Creating Authorization Token

Creating Authorization Token

Finally, save the Jenkins Global configurations by clicking on the “Save” icon.

There is one last configuration which has to be set up. In order to run SonarQube scan for our project, we need to install and configure the SonarQube scanner in our Jenkins. For that, let’s go to Manage Jenkins -> Global Tool Configuration -> SonarQube Scanner -> SonarQube Scanner installations. Enter any meaningful name under the Name field and select an appropriate method in which you want to install this tool in Jenkins. Here, we are going to select “Install automatically” option. Then, click on “Save”.

SonarQube Scanner Configuration in Jenkins

SonarQube Scanner Configuration in Jenkins

Creating and Configuring Jenkins Pipeline Job

Since we are all set with the global configurations, let’s now create a Jenkins Pipeline Job for a simple node.js application for which code analysis will be done by SonarQube.

For that, let’s click on “New Item” in Jenkins home page and enter the job name as “sonarqube_test_pipeline” and then select the “Pipeline” option and then click on “OK”.

Creating Jenkins Pipeline job

Creating Jenkins Pipeline job

Now, inside the job configuration, let’s go to the Pipeline step and select Pipeline Script from SCM and then select Git and enter the Repository URL and then save the job.

Pipeline Job Configuration

##backtobasics #continuous integration #devops #blueocean #ci #code review #continous integration #docker #docker-compose #git #github #jenkins #jenkins pipeline #nodejs #sonarqube #sonarqube scanner #static code analysis

Docker Architecture Overview & Docker Components [For Beginners]

If you have recently come across the world of containers, it’s probably not a bad idea to understand the underlying elements that work together to offer containerisation benefits. But before that, there’s a question that you may ask. What problem do containers solve?

After building an application in a typical development lifecycle, the developer sends it to the tester for testing purposes. However, since the development and testing environments are different, the code fails to work.

Now, predominantly, there are two solutions to this – either you use a Virtual Machine or a containerised environment such as Docker. In the good old times, organisations used to deploy VMs for running multiple applications.

So, why did they started adopting containerisation over VMs? In this article, we will provide detailed explanations of all such questions.

#docker containers #docker engine #docker #docker architecture

Docker manifest - A peek into image's manifest.json files

docker manifest – An experimental feature !

The image manifest provides a configuration and a set of layers for a container image.

This is an experimental feature. To enable this feature in the Docker CLI, one can edit the config.json file found in ~/.docker/config.json like :

{
        "auths": {
                "https://index.docker.io/v1/": {
                        "auth": "XXXXXXX"
                }
        },
        "HttpHeaders": {
                "User-Agent": "Docker-Client/19.03.8 (linux)"
        },
        "experimental": "enabled",
        "debug": true
}

What is ‘docker manifest’ ?

The docker manifest command does not work independently to perform any action. In order to work with the docker manifest or manifest list, we use sub-commands along with it. This manifest sub-command can enable us to interact with the image manifests. Furthermore, it also gives information about the OS and the architecture, that a particular image was built for.

A single manifest comprises of information about an image, it’s size, the layers and digest.

A manifest list is a list of image layers (manifests) that are, created by specifying one or more image names. It can then be used in the same way as an image name in docker pull and docker run commands.

Commands to get started with :

After enabling this feature, one would be able to access the following command :

docker-manifest-enter image description here

These commands are easy to use. It basically avoids the need for pulling and running and then testing the images locally, from a docker registry.

Next, to inspect an image manifest, follow this syntax,

 docker manifest inspect image-name

enter image description here

.

#devops #docker #devops #docker #docker learning #docker-image

Iliana  Welch

Iliana Welch

1597368540

Docker Tutorial for Beginners 8 - Build and Run C++ Applications in a Docker Container

Docker is an open platform that allows use package, develop, run, and ship software applications in different environments using containers.
In this course We will learn How to Write Dockerfiles, Working with the Docker Toolbox, How to Work with the Docker Machine, How to Use Docker Compose to fire up multiple containers, How to Work with Docker Kinematic, Push images to Docker Hub, Pull images from a Docker Registery, Push stacks of servers to Docker Hub.
How to install Docker on Mac.

#docker tutorial #c++ #docker container #docker #docker hub #devopstools