How do I create a static web page that fetches data from Excel and displays it using HTML?

HTML 5 Tutorial: How to create a table using HTML tags and Stylesheet (CSS)

HTML 5 Tutorial: How to create a table using HTML tags and Stylesheet (CSS)

In this article, we want to show you how to create a table using HTML tags and Stylesheet (CSS). HTML table may vary depends on data and style requirements. Sometimes, in the real application, we use an HTML table as a layout of the Email template in HTML format.

In this article, we want to show you how to create a table using HTML tags and Stylesheet (CSS). HTML table may vary depends on data and style requirements. Sometimes, in the real application, we use an HTML table as a layout of the Email template in HTML format.

HTML Table uses to represent tabular data like in the Excel Application and arrange the layout of the Web View.

There are some common HTML tags that use by HTML table:

Before start practicing HTML 5 table, make sure all

tag put inside complete and tag.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
 <head>
  <title>Basic HTML Table</title>
 </head>
 <body>
  <table></table>
 </body>
</html>

Basic HTML Table

Here is an example of a basic HTML table or common use of the above HTML tags to define or create a table.

<table>
 <tr>
  <th>No.</th>
  <th>Full Name</th>
  <th>Position</th>
  <th>Salary</th>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td>1</td>
  <td>Bill Gates</td>
  <td>Founder Microsoft</td>
  <td><table>
 <tr>
  <th>No.</th>
  <th>Full Name</th>
  <th>Position</th>
  <th>Salary</th>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td>1</td>
  <td>Bill Gates</td>
  <td>Founder Microsoft</td>
  <td>$1000</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td>2</td>
  <td>Steve Jobs</td>
  <td>Founder Apple</td>
  <td>$1200</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td>3</td>
  <td>Larry Page</td>
  <td>Founder Google</td>
  <td>$1100</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td>4</td>
  <td>Mark Zuckeberg</td>
  <td>Founder Facebook</td>
  <td>$1300</td>
 </tr>
</table>
000</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td>2</td>
  <td>Steve Jobs</td>
  <td>Founder Apple</td>
  <td><table>
 <tr>
  <th>No.</th>
  <th>Full Name</th>
  <th>Position</th>
  <th>Salary</th>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td>1</td>
  <td>Bill Gates</td>
  <td>Founder Microsoft</td>
  <td>$1000</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td>2</td>
  <td>Steve Jobs</td>
  <td>Founder Apple</td>
  <td>$1200</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td>3</td>
  <td>Larry Page</td>
  <td>Founder Google</td>
  <td>$1100</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td>4</td>
  <td>Mark Zuckeberg</td>
  <td>Founder Facebook</td>
  <td>$1300</td>
 </tr>
</table>
200</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td>3</td>
  <td>Larry Page</td>
  <td>Founder Google</td>
  <td><table>
 <tr>
  <th>No.</th>
  <th>Full Name</th>
  <th>Position</th>
  <th>Salary</th>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td>1</td>
  <td>Bill Gates</td>
  <td>Founder Microsoft</td>
  <td>$1000</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td>2</td>
  <td>Steve Jobs</td>
  <td>Founder Apple</td>
  <td>$1200</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td>3</td>
  <td>Larry Page</td>
  <td>Founder Google</td>
  <td>$1100</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td>4</td>
  <td>Mark Zuckeberg</td>
  <td>Founder Facebook</td>
  <td>$1300</td>
 </tr>
</table>
100</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td>4</td>
  <td>Mark Zuckeberg</td>
  <td>Founder Facebook</td>
  <td><table>
 <tr>
  <th>No.</th>
  <th>Full Name</th>
  <th>Position</th>
  <th>Salary</th>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td>1</td>
  <td>Bill Gates</td>
  <td>Founder Microsoft</td>
  <td>$1000</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td>2</td>
  <td>Steve Jobs</td>
  <td>Founder Apple</td>
  <td>$1200</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td>3</td>
  <td>Larry Page</td>
  <td>Founder Google</td>
  <td>$1100</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td>4</td>
  <td>Mark Zuckeberg</td>
  <td>Founder Facebook</td>
  <td>$1300</td>
 </tr>
</table>
300</td>
 </tr>
</table>

Output:

As a default, HTML 5 table not defined with border, you should add the border manually in each table cells.

HTML Table with Border

To add a basic border to HTML 5 table, simply add this style attribute in

tag.

<table style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">

Output:

As you can see, Table Border only draw lines to the table only and cells left borderless. To make border for all cells, add style attribute to all and all .

<table style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">
 <tr>
  <th style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">No.</th>
  <th style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Full Name</th>
  <th style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Position</th>
  <th style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Salary</th>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">1</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Bill Gates</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Founder Microsoft</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;"><table style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">
 <tr>
  <th style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">No.</th>
  <th style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Full Name</th>
  <th style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Position</th>
  <th style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Salary</th>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">1</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Bill Gates</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Founder Microsoft</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">$1000</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">2</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Steve Jobs</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Founder Apple</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">$1200</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">3</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Larry Page</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Founder Google</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">$1100</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">4</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Mark Zuckeberg</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Founder Facebook</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">$1300</td>
 </tr>
</table>
000</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">2</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Steve Jobs</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Founder Apple</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;"><table style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">
 <tr>
  <th style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">No.</th>
  <th style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Full Name</th>
  <th style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Position</th>
  <th style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Salary</th>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">1</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Bill Gates</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Founder Microsoft</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">$1000</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">2</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Steve Jobs</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Founder Apple</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">$1200</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">3</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Larry Page</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Founder Google</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">$1100</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">4</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Mark Zuckeberg</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Founder Facebook</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">$1300</td>
 </tr>
</table>
200</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">3</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Larry Page</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Founder Google</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;"><table style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">
 <tr>
  <th style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">No.</th>
  <th style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Full Name</th>
  <th style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Position</th>
  <th style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Salary</th>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">1</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Bill Gates</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Founder Microsoft</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">$1000</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">2</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Steve Jobs</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Founder Apple</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">$1200</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">3</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Larry Page</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Founder Google</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">$1100</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">4</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Mark Zuckeberg</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Founder Facebook</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">$1300</td>
 </tr>
</table>
100</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">4</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Mark Zuckeberg</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Founder Facebook</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;"><table style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">
 <tr>
  <th style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">No.</th>
  <th style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Full Name</th>
  <th style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Position</th>
  <th style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Salary</th>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">1</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Bill Gates</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Founder Microsoft</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">$1000</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">2</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Steve Jobs</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Founder Apple</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">$1200</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">3</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Larry Page</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Founder Google</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">$1100</td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">4</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Mark Zuckeberg</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">Founder Facebook</td>
  <td style="border: solid 1px #aaa999;">$1300</td>
 </tr>
</table>
300</td>
 </tr>
</table>

If you want a simple coding without writing a style for each cells, use

Render HTML with Vanilla JavaScript and lit-html

Render HTML with Vanilla JavaScript and lit-html

Sometimes you need to render HTML elements on a web page. And like Goldilocks' search for "just right", you have to try a few techniques before you find the right one. Using a framework may be too hard. Using pure HTML and the DOM API may be too soft. What you need is something in the middle that is just right. Is lit-html "just right"? Let's find out.

Sometimes you need to render HTML elements on a web page. And like Goldilocks' search for "just right", you have to try a few techniques before you find the right one. Using a framework may be too hard. Using pure HTML and the DOM API may be too soft. What you need is something in the middle that is just right. Is lit-html "just right"? Let's find out.

First, I'll show how this all works. Then at the end of this article, I'll explain everything you need to get started with lit-html to try this for yourself.

When you're done, you can push your HTML app with lit-html to the cloud to see it in all of its glory! I included a link to a free Azure trial, so you can try it yourself.

Resources:

The Sample App

Here is the app I'll demonstrate in this article. It fetches a list of heroes and renders them when you click the button. It also renders a progress indicator while it is fetching.

What's the Value of lit-html

When you focus on rendering content, and nothing else, lit-html is a good fit. It works closely with the DOM to render content, and refresh it in an optimal manner. The docs can provide you with more details, but the basic code for lit-html looks like this.

// Credit: As seen in official docs https://lit-html.polymer-project.org/guide/getting-started

// Import lit-html
import { html, render } from 'lit-html';

// Define a template
const myTemplate = name =>
  html`
    <p>Hello ${name}</p>
  `;

// Render the template to the document
render(myTemplate('World'), document.body);

You import lit-html, define a template, then render it to the DOM. That's it!

Rendering HTML

A progress bar is fairly basic. There is some HTML, and we show it when needed and hide it when it is not required. While we could use a template, or innerHTML, or the DOM API for this, let's see what this would look like with lit-html.

First, we get a reference to the element in the DOM where the progress bar will appear.

Then we define the template. This code looks and feels like JSX (or TSX). The advantage here is that you can write the HTML. You wrap the HTML in a template string (notice the back-tick character is used and not a single quote). Template strings allow you to span lines and insert variables where needed (we'll see this soon). The magic that makes this work is the html tag that precedes the template string. The html tag is what tells lit-html that you are about to define a template.

Next, we compile the template and pass those results to lit-html's render function, which places the results in the DOM. Finally, we hide or show the progress bar as needed.

function showProgress(show = true) {
  const container = document.getElementById('progress-placeholder');

  const template: () => TemplateResult = () => html`
    <progress class="progress is-medium is-info" max="100"></progress>
  `;
  const result = template();
  render(result, container);

  container.style.display = show ? 'block' : 'none';
}

Now you can run this showProgress function any time you want to show the progress bar.

Note that when a template is re-rendered, the only part that is updated is the data that changed. If no data changed, nothing is updated.

Rendering HTML with Dynamic Values

The progress bar does not change each time it is rendered. You will have situations where you want your HTML to change. For example, you may have a message area on your web app that shows a styled message box with a title and a message. The title and message will change every time you show the message area. Now you have dynamic values.

The HTML is defined with a template string, so it is trivial to add a variable into it. Notice the code below adds a title and text into the template, using the ${data.title} and ${data.text} syntax, respectively.

Then the template is compiled and rendered were needed.

When this template is re-rendered, the only part that is updated is the data that changed. In this case, that's the title and text.

function showMessage(text: string, title = 'Info') {
  const template: (data: any) => TemplateResult = (data: Message) => html`
    <div id="message-box" class="message is-info">
      <h3 class="message-header">${data.title}</h3>
      <p class="message-body">${data.text}</p>
    </div>
  `;

  const el = document.getElementById('message-placeholder');
  const result = template({ title, text });
  render(result, el);

  el.style.visibility = !!text ? 'visible' : 'hidden';
}

Rendering a List

Things get a little more real when we render a list. Let's think about that for a moment. A list requires that we have a plan if there is data and a backup plan if there is no data. A list requires that we render the same thing for each row, and we don't know how many rows we have. A list requires that we pass different values for each row, too. Then we have to take the rows and wrap them in a container such as a <ul> or a <table>.

So there is a little more logic here, regardless of whether we use lit-html or any other technique. Let's explore how the replaceHeroList function renders the rows using lit-html.

function replaceHeroList(heroes?: Hero[]) {
 const heroPlaceholder = document.querySelector('.hero-list');

 // Define the template
 let template: () => TemplateResult;

 if (heroes && heroes.length) {
   // Create the template for every hero row
   template = createList();
 } else {
   // Create the template with a simple "not found" message
   template = () =>
     html`
       <p>heroes not found</p>
     `;
 }

 // Compile the template
 const result = template();

 // Render the template
 render(result, heroPlaceholder);

Notice that when there are heroes, we call the createList function. This function begins by creating an array of TemplateResult. So for every hero in the heroes array, we define a template that represents the <li> containing the HTML that displays that respective hero.

Then we create another template that contains the <ul> and embeds the array of hero templates. It's pretty cool that we can embed templates like this! Finally, we return it all and let the logic compile the templates and render them.

function createList() {
  // Create an array of the templates for each hero
  const templates: TemplateResult[] = heroes.map(hero => {
    return html`
      <li>
        <div class="card">
          <div class="card-content">
            <div class="content">
              <div class="name">${hero.name}</div>
              <div class="description">${hero.description}</div>
            </div>
          </div>
        </div>
      </li>
    `;
  });

  // Create a template that includes the hero templates
  const ulTemplate: () => TemplateResult = () =>
    html`
      <ul>
        ${templates}
      </ul>
    `;
  return ulTemplate;
}

Summary

When you want to render HTML, lit-html is a fast and light-weight option. Is it better than using templates and the DOM API? You'll have to decide what is best for you. But the real story here is that you have another great option to consider when determining the right tool for your job.

Prologue

You can also get editor help with your lit-html templates. Notice the image below shows the syntax highlighting for the HTML template!

Setup

You can install the lit-html package with npm.

npm install lit-html

Alternately you can load it directly from the unpkg.com CDN

import { html, render } from 'https://unpkg.com/lit-html?module';

You have a choice here. npm is my preference, but feel 100% free to use the CDN if that suits you.

TypeScript and lit-html

You only need to include the library for lit-html and you're done. But I like to use TypeScript, and I absolutely recommend enabling your tooling to work great with typeScript and lit-html.

Let me be very clear here - you do not need TypeScript. I choose to use it because it helps identify mistakes while I write code. If you don't want TypeScript, you can opt to use plain JavaScript.

Here are the steps to make TypeScript and lit-html light up together:

  1. Install TypeScript support for lit-html
  2. Configure your tsconfig.json file
  3. Install the VS Code extension for lit-html

Run this command to install the plugin and typescript, as development dependencies to your project.

npm install --save-dev typescript-lit-html-plugin typescript

Edit your tsconfig.json by adding the following to your compilerOptions section.

"compilerOptions": {
  "plugins": [
    {
      "name": "typescript-lit-html-plugin"
    }
  ]
}

Finally, install the VS Code extension for lit-html.

Now you get syntax highlighting for all of your lit-html templates!

HTML 5 tutorial - How to view Google Maps in the HTML Page?

HTML 5 tutorial - How to view Google Maps in the HTML Page?

In this HTML 5 tutorial, we will show you how to view Google Maps in the HTML page in just a few lines of HTML tags, CSS, and Javascript codes.

An example of view Google Maps in HTML page from scratch complete with setup Google Maps Javascript API

We will start this tutorial with the setup of Google Maps API in the Google Developer Console. After that, we will display or view Google Maps in the HTML page using the created Google API Key. Configuration and layout will be done using a little** Javascript** and CSS codes.

Setup Google Maps API Key

To view Google Maps in the HTML page using Javascript API we need a Google Maps API key. The Google Maps JavaScript API lets you customize maps with your own content and imagery for display on web pages and mobile devices. The Maps JavaScript API features four basic map types (roadmap, satellite, hybrid, and terrain) which you can modify using layers and styles, controls and events, and various services and libraries.

Next, open your browser the go to the Google Developer Console. You will be taken to this Google Developer Console page.

Just scroll the default opened projects then it will take to this dialog.

Click the "New Project" button then it will take to this New Google Project page.

Fill the project name and leave other fields as default then click the "Create" button and it will take to the Google Developer Console home page with default opened project. Select again the project then choose the newly created Google project and click the "OK" button. It will take to the new Google project dashboard without any APIs enabled.

Click the "Enable API" button then it will take to this Google APIs library page.

Find and choose Maps Javascript API then it will take to this Maps Javascript API page.

Just click on the "Enable" button then it will take back to the Maps Javascript API dashboard.

Click on Credentials link then it will take to the Credentials page.

Click on "+ Create Credentials" link then choose "API KEY" and it will take to the API KEY dialog. Copy and paste the newly created API KEY to your Notepad or Text Editor for using in the HTML page.

View Google Maps in HTML Page

Now, we will create an HTML page from scratch starting by creating a new HTML file in your project folder. You can create the HTML file using your text editor, IDE, or terminal/command line. Next, open and edit that HTML file then adds these HTML tags that just contain a div for viewing Google Maps.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <head>
    <title>HTML Google Maps</title>
    <meta name="viewport" content="initial-scale=1.0">
    <meta charset="utf-8">
  </head>
  <body>
    <div id="map"></div>
  </body>
</html>

As you can see, we declare an HTML 5 page by defining HTML using this tag . Next, include the Google Maps Javascript API before the closing of tag.

<script src="https://maps.googleapis.com/maps/api/js?key=YOUR_API_KEY&callback=initMap"
    async defer></script>

In that Google Maps Javascript API calls include a callback to "initMap" function. Add a Javascript code after or before that Google Maps Javascript API calls.

<script>
  var map;
  function initMap() {
    map = new google.maps.Map(document.getElementById('map'), {
      center: {lat: 53.430938, lng: -2.960841},
      zoom: 17
    });
  }
</script>

Just using the HTML page and Javascript function will not display Google maps in the browser. For that, you have determined the size of MAP DIV using CSS. Add the CSS or STYLE codes before the end of the tag.

<style>
    #map {
      height: 100%;
    }
    html, body {
      height: 100%;
      margin: 0;
      padding: 0;
    }
</style>

Now, you can see the Google Maps in the HTML page like this.

If you see a Grey Google Maps view like ours, that means, your Google developers account to reach the limits of API quota's and it needs to upgrade.

That it's, an example of View Google Maps in HTML Page. You can find the full source code in our GitHub.