Houston  Sipes

Houston Sipes

1596864420

Cisco, Zoom and Others Must Bolster Security, Say Privacy Chiefs

Privacy commissioners worldwide urged video conferencing systems like Microsoft, Cisco and Zoom to adopt end-to-end encryption, two-factor authentication and other security measures.

Global privacy commissioners issued a joint public decry against leading video conferencing companies such as Cisco Systems, Microsoft and Zoom to demand the companies beef up their security and privacy strategies.

The critique was delivered via an open letter published by data protection and privacy commissioners from Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, United Kingdom and Switzerland.

The letter, sent Tuesday, is in response to a litany of security flaws and privacy holes reported (and mostly patched) in popular videoconferencing platforms and applications.

“During the current pandemic we have observed some worrying reports of security flaws in VTC (video teleconferencing) products purportedly leading to unauthorized access to accounts, shared files, and calls,” said the open letter, titled “Joint statement on global privacy expectations of Video Teleconferencing companies.”

The criticisms come amid the soaring popularity of video conferencing platforms, driven by work-from-home policies tied to the Coronavirus pandemic. The video conferencing market is white hot. Market research firm Global Market Insights reported the video conferencing market was worth $14 billion in 2019 and is projected to grow to $50 billion by 2026.

The joint letter urged the providers to adopt measures such as end-to-end encryption, strong passwords and two-factor authentication (2FA). End-to-end encryption has been a spotlight problem for Zoom, which earlier this year came under fire for announcing that it would only offer the feature to paying users.

These security considerations are especially critical for video conferencing users with sensitive information, such as hospitals, medical consultations and online therapists, according to the letter.

“Your organization should remain constantly aware of new security risks and threats to the VTC platform and be agile in your response to them,” according to the authorities. “We would anticipate that you routinely require users of your platform to upgrade the version of the app they have installed, to ensure that they are up-to-date with the latest patches and security upgrades.”

The privacy of user data was also a concern addressed. The commissioners urged video conferencing providers to create “privacy conscious” default settings for their platforms, such as implementing strong access controls by default and clearly announcing new callers. The measure is in response to various video conference meetings being hijacked by cybercriminals during the pandemic.

These incidents happened most frequently in Zoom users – including both during school meetings and in private government meetings – earning the perpetrators the name  “Zoom bombers.”

The letter also urged platforms to implement features allowing business users to seek other users’ consent and minimizing personal data captured, used and disclosed. Other “principles” that video conferencing platforms are urged to re-evaluate revolve around transparency, end-user control and “knowing your audience.”

“Particular attention should also be paid to ensuring that information is adequately protected when processed by third-parties, including in other countries,” according to the letter.

Remote-collaboration platforms have been facing scrutiny for months, with Zoom, Slack, Trello, WebEx and Microsoft Teams facing threats of vulnerabilities, credential stuffing, social engineering, and privacy flaws. While the letter is intended for all video conferencing services, Microsoft, Cisco, Zoom, House Party and Google were sent the letter directly.

“We welcome responses to this open letter from VTC companies, by Sept. 30, 2020, to demonstrate how they are taking these principles into account in the design and delivery of their services,” according to the commissioners.

#privacy #cisco #coronavirus #end to end encryption #google #house party #microsoft #privacy commissioners #security #two factor authentication #video conferencing systems #vulnerability #work from home #zoom #zoom bomb

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Cisco, Zoom and Others Must Bolster Security, Say Privacy Chiefs
Houston  Sipes

Houston Sipes

1596864420

Cisco, Zoom and Others Must Bolster Security, Say Privacy Chiefs

Privacy commissioners worldwide urged video conferencing systems like Microsoft, Cisco and Zoom to adopt end-to-end encryption, two-factor authentication and other security measures.

Global privacy commissioners issued a joint public decry against leading video conferencing companies such as Cisco Systems, Microsoft and Zoom to demand the companies beef up their security and privacy strategies.

The critique was delivered via an open letter published by data protection and privacy commissioners from Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, United Kingdom and Switzerland.

The letter, sent Tuesday, is in response to a litany of security flaws and privacy holes reported (and mostly patched) in popular videoconferencing platforms and applications.

“During the current pandemic we have observed some worrying reports of security flaws in VTC (video teleconferencing) products purportedly leading to unauthorized access to accounts, shared files, and calls,” said the open letter, titled “Joint statement on global privacy expectations of Video Teleconferencing companies.”

The criticisms come amid the soaring popularity of video conferencing platforms, driven by work-from-home policies tied to the Coronavirus pandemic. The video conferencing market is white hot. Market research firm Global Market Insights reported the video conferencing market was worth $14 billion in 2019 and is projected to grow to $50 billion by 2026.

The joint letter urged the providers to adopt measures such as end-to-end encryption, strong passwords and two-factor authentication (2FA). End-to-end encryption has been a spotlight problem for Zoom, which earlier this year came under fire for announcing that it would only offer the feature to paying users.

These security considerations are especially critical for video conferencing users with sensitive information, such as hospitals, medical consultations and online therapists, according to the letter.

“Your organization should remain constantly aware of new security risks and threats to the VTC platform and be agile in your response to them,” according to the authorities. “We would anticipate that you routinely require users of your platform to upgrade the version of the app they have installed, to ensure that they are up-to-date with the latest patches and security upgrades.”

The privacy of user data was also a concern addressed. The commissioners urged video conferencing providers to create “privacy conscious” default settings for their platforms, such as implementing strong access controls by default and clearly announcing new callers. The measure is in response to various video conference meetings being hijacked by cybercriminals during the pandemic.

These incidents happened most frequently in Zoom users – including both during school meetings and in private government meetings – earning the perpetrators the name  “Zoom bombers.”

The letter also urged platforms to implement features allowing business users to seek other users’ consent and minimizing personal data captured, used and disclosed. Other “principles” that video conferencing platforms are urged to re-evaluate revolve around transparency, end-user control and “knowing your audience.”

“Particular attention should also be paid to ensuring that information is adequately protected when processed by third-parties, including in other countries,” according to the letter.

Remote-collaboration platforms have been facing scrutiny for months, with Zoom, Slack, Trello, WebEx and Microsoft Teams facing threats of vulnerabilities, credential stuffing, social engineering, and privacy flaws. While the letter is intended for all video conferencing services, Microsoft, Cisco, Zoom, House Party and Google were sent the letter directly.

“We welcome responses to this open letter from VTC companies, by Sept. 30, 2020, to demonstrate how they are taking these principles into account in the design and delivery of their services,” according to the commissioners.

#privacy #cisco #coronavirus #end to end encryption #google #house party #microsoft #privacy commissioners #security #two factor authentication #video conferencing systems #vulnerability #work from home #zoom #zoom bomb

Zoom Rolls Out End-to-End Encryption After Setbacks

Video-conferencing giant Zoom is rolling out a technical preview of its end-to-end encryption (E2EE) next week.

Zoom has faced various controversies around its encryption policies over the past year, including several lawsuits alleging that the company falsely told users that it offers full encryption. Then, the platform came under fire in May when it announced that it would indeed offer E2EE — but to paid users only. The company later backtracked after backlash from privacy advocates, who argued that security measures should be available to all. Zoom will now offer the feature to free/”Basic” users.

The first phase of the E2EE rollout aims to solicit feedback when it comes to its policies. Users will be able to weigh in during the first 30 days. Of note, users will need to turn on the feature manually (see below for details).

“We’re pleased to roll out Phase 1 of 4 of our E2EE offering, which provides robust protections to help prevent the interception of decryption keys that could be used to monitor meeting content,” said Max Krohn, head of security engineering with Zoom, in a Wednesday post.

End-To-End Encryption Errors

The topic of encryption is critical for Zoom as it ramps up its security and privacy measures – particularly after various security flaws and privacy issues exposed weaknesses in the online meeting platform, as its user base spiked during the coronavirus pandemic.

Zoom previously said that it offered E2EE, but that marketing claim came into question after a March report from The Intercept said that Zoom’s platform actually uses transport layer security (TLS) encryption, providing only encryption between individual users and service providers, instead of directly between the users of a system.

While “encryption” means that in-transit messages are encrypted, true E2EE occurs when the message is encrypted at the source user’s device, stays encrypted while its routed through servers, and then is decrypted only at the destination user’s device.

On the heels of this backlash, Zoom in May acquired a small startup called Keybase, with the aim of providing more robust encryption for Zoom calls.

In the case of next week’s rollout, Zoom’s E2EE offering will use public-key cryptography, meaning that the keys for each Zoom meeting are generated by participants’ machines (as opposed to Zoom’s servers).

#cloud security #vulnerabilities #web security #coronavirus #covid-19 #e2ee #encryption #end to end encryption #pandemic #remote work #security #transport layer security encryption #video conferencing security #zoom #zoom meeting #zoom-bombing

Mitchel  Carter

Mitchel Carter

1603072800

Cisco Fixes High-Severity Webex, Security Camera Flaws

Cisco has issued patches for high-severity vulnerabilities plaguing its popular Webex video-conferencing system, its video surveillance IP cameras and its Identity Services Engine network administration product.

Overall, Cisco on Wednesday issued the three high-severity flaws along with 11 medium-severity vulnerabilities.

The most severe of these is a flaw (CVE-2020-3544) in Cisco’s Video Surveillance 8000 Series IP Cameras, which ranks 8.8 out of 10 on the CVSS scale.

“A vulnerability in the Cisco Discovery Protocol [CDP] implementation for Cisco Video Surveillance 8000 Series IP Cameras could allow an unauthenticated, adjacent attacker to execute arbitrary code on an affected device or cause the device to reload,” according to Cisco’s security advisory.

The CDP is a network-discovery tool that helps network administrators identify neighboring Cisco devices. The vulnerability is due to missing checks when an IP camera processes a CDP packet.

To exploit the flaw, an attacker does not need to be authenticated. However, the person must be in the same broadcast domain as the affected device — because CDP is a Layer 2 protocol, attackers must be Layer 2-adjacent.

“An attacker could exploit this vulnerability by sending a malicious [CDP] packet to an affected device,” according to Cisco. “A successful exploit could allow the attacker to execute code on the affected IP camera or cause it to reload unexpectedly, resulting in a denial of service (DoS) condition.”

The vulnerability affects cameras running a firmware release earlier than Release 1.0.9-5 that have the CDP enabled, said Cisco. Of note, Cisco Video Surveillance 8000 Series IP Cameras are no longer being sold as of July 24; however, vulnerability and security support does not end until July 24, 2023.

Webex Bug

Cisco also patched a high-severity flaw affecting its Webex platform. This issue is severe given the troves of workforces turning to video conferencing systems during the pandemic – however, it is significantly complex to exploit, as an attacker would need to be both authenticated (needing valid credentials on the Windows system) and local.

The vulnerability stems from the incorrect handling of directory paths at run time. An attacker could exploit this vulnerability by placing a malicious DLL file in a specific location on the targeted system, which would then execute when the vulnerable application launches.

“A successful exploit could allow the attacker to execute arbitrary code on the targeted system with the privileges of another user’s account,” according to Cisco.

The flaw (CVE-2020-3535) affects Cisco Webex Teams for Windows releases 3.0.13464.0 through 3.0.16040.0; it does not affect Webex Teams for Android, Mac or iPhone and iPad.

#vulnerabilities #web security #cisco #cisco discovery protocol #cisco webex #cisco’s video surveillance 8000 series ip cameras #cve-2020-3467 #cve-2020-3535 #cve-2020-3544 #high severity flaw #identity services engine #patches #security camera #security vulnerabilities

Wilford  Pagac

Wilford Pagac

1596789120

Best Custom Web & Mobile App Development Company

Everything around us has become smart, like smart infrastructures, smart cities, autonomous vehicles, to name a few. The innovation of smart devices makes it possible to achieve these heights in science and technology. But, data is vulnerable, there is a risk of attack by cybercriminals. To get started, let’s know about IoT devices.

What are IoT devices?

The Internet Of Things(IoT) is a system that interrelates computer devices like sensors, software, and actuators, digital machines, etc. They are linked together with particular objects that work through the internet and transfer data over devices without humans interference.

Famous examples are Amazon Alexa, Apple SIRI, Interconnected baby monitors, video doorbells, and smart thermostats.

How could your IoT devices be vulnerable?

When technologies grow and evolve, risks are also on the high stakes. Ransomware attacks are on the continuous increase; securing data has become the top priority.

When you think your smart home won’t fudge a thing against cybercriminals, you should also know that they are vulnerable. When cybercriminals access our smart voice speakers like Amazon Alexa or Apple Siri, it becomes easy for them to steal your data.

Cybersecurity report 2020 says popular hacking forums expose 770 million email addresses and 21 million unique passwords, 620 million accounts have been compromised from 16 hacked websites.

The attacks are likely to increase every year. To help you secure your data of IoT devices, here are some best tips you can implement.

Tips to secure your IoT devices

1. Change Default Router Name

Your router has the default name of make and model. When we stick with the manufacturer name, attackers can quickly identify our make and model. So give the router name different from your addresses, without giving away personal information.

2. Know your connected network and connected devices

If your devices are connected to the internet, these connections are vulnerable to cyber attacks when your devices don’t have the proper security. Almost every web interface is equipped with multiple devices, so it’s hard to track the device. But, it’s crucial to stay aware of them.

3. Change default usernames and passwords

When we use the default usernames and passwords, it is attackable. Because the cybercriminals possibly know the default passwords come with IoT devices. So use strong passwords to access our IoT devices.

4. Manage strong, Unique passwords for your IoT devices and accounts

Use strong or unique passwords that are easily assumed, such as ‘123456’ or ‘password1234’ to protect your accounts. Give strong and complex passwords formed by combinations of alphabets, numeric, and not easily bypassed symbols.

Also, change passwords for multiple accounts and change them regularly to avoid attacks. We can also set several attempts to wrong passwords to set locking the account to safeguard from the hackers.

5. Do not use Public WI-FI Networks

Are you try to keep an eye on your IoT devices through your mobile devices in different locations. I recommend you not to use the public WI-FI network to access them. Because they are easily accessible through for everyone, you are still in a hurry to access, use VPN that gives them protection against cyber-attacks, giving them privacy and security features, for example, using Express VPN.

6. Establish firewalls to discover the vulnerabilities

There are software and firewalls like intrusion detection system/intrusion prevention system in the market. This will be useful to screen and analyze the wire traffic of a network. You can identify the security weakness by the firewall scanners within the network structure. Use these firewalls to get rid of unwanted security issues and vulnerabilities.

7. Reconfigure your device settings

Every smart device comes with the insecure default settings, and sometimes we are not able to change these default settings configurations. These conditions need to be assessed and need to reconfigure the default settings.

8. Authenticate the IoT applications

Nowadays, every smart app offers authentication to secure the accounts. There are many types of authentication methods like single-factor authentication, two-step authentication, and multi-factor authentication. Use any one of these to send a one time password (OTP) to verify the user who logs in the smart device to keep our accounts from falling into the wrong hands.

9. Update the device software up to date

Every smart device manufacturer releases updates to fix bugs in their software. These security patches help us to improve our protection of the device. Also, update the software on the smartphone, which we are used to monitoring the IoT devices to avoid vulnerabilities.

10. Track the smartphones and keep them safe

When we connect the smart home to the smartphone and control them via smartphone, you need to keep them safe. If you miss the phone almost, every personal information is at risk to the cybercriminals. But sometimes it happens by accident, makes sure that you can clear all the data remotely.

However, securing smart devices is essential in the world of data. There are still cybercriminals bypassing the securities. So make sure to do the safety measures to avoid our accounts falling out into the wrong hands. I hope these steps will help you all to secure your IoT devices.

If you have any, feel free to share them in the comments! I’d love to know them.

Are you looking for more? Subscribe to weekly newsletters that can help your stay updated IoT application developments.

#iot #enterprise iot security #how iot can be used to enhance security #how to improve iot security #how to protect iot devices from hackers #how to secure iot devices #iot security #iot security devices #iot security offerings #iot security technologies iot security plus #iot vulnerable devices #risk based iot security program

Zakary  Goyette

Zakary Goyette

1599651600

These are the Top 5 Browsers for Privacy and Security

Anonymity on the internet has been in a steady state of decline. In the interest of reversing that trend, this is a list of the top five browsers for privacy and security. While it should be noted that nothing published on the internet is perfectly private or secure, these are the browsers that will do the most to get you close.

The issue

Modern digital marketing agencies, eCommerce sites, and ISPs use cookies to show ads or monetize your browsing data without permission. If there’s a buck to be made, someone will make it.

But anonymous browsing can act as some sort of cover. Not complete cover, however, but more than it’s more than nothing. To enhance your privacy and security while browsing the web, consider these five browsers.

Tor Browser :

Tor is fully open-sourced and great for anonymous web browsing. It protects against snooping on web browsing activity. Nowadays a lot of ads agencies use this technique to serve you what they believe to be perfectly tantalizing ad content.

Tor is a cross-platform web browser, which means it supports platforms like Windows, macOS, Linu and more. It can also be used as via a USB device and configured to a user’s specifications. While many say it’s a browser designed for hackers, it can also be used by those who simply value their privacy.

Tor hides your IP, which means your physical location is unavailable to those looking for where you’re searching what. It also helps users get around restrictions used by governments looking to block what can be accessed within their borders.

Pros:

  • An open-source browser
  • Committed to privacy
  • Comes with .onion browser extension for extra security
  • Shields IP addresses from websites
  • Uses strong server relays

Cons:

  • Slower than regular browsers
  • Doesn’t block malware
  • Tells websites Tor is in use

#security #privacy #browsers #privacy-browsers #browsers-for-security #tor #secure-browsers