Everything you need to know to get started with JAMstack

JAMstack sites are all the rage right now in the web dev world. And rightfully so! But what exactly is it and how can we all take advantage of its benefits?

  • What is this JAMstack?
  • That’s not to be confused with serverless
  • What makes up the JAMstack?
  • So what makes a JAMstack app so great?
  • Is my website considered to be on the JAMstack?
  • What are some examples of JAMstack?
  • What are some tools I can use to build JAMstack sites or apps?

What is this JAMstack?

To start, JAMstack is a software architecture and philosophy that adheres to the following components: Javascript, APIs, and Markup.

If this sounds familiar, it’s because it is! That React app that you compile down with Webpack and ultimately serve from S3? Yup, that’s a JAMstack app. That simple HTML file that has no JavaScript and literally doesn’t do anything dynamic? Yup, that’s also a JAMstack app.

That’s not to be confused with serverless

If you’re coming more from the cloud side of things (think AWS, GCP, Azure), you might be inclined to think of serverless and JAMstack as the name thing. Granted they have similarities in the philosophy of how resources are managed, such as hosting a site on S3. But a JAMstack app is not always going to be a serverless app.

Consider an app hosted in static storage on the cloud provider of your choice. Yes, you might be serving the app in a serverless way, but you might be dealing with an API that utilizes Wordpress or Rails, both of which are certainly not serverless.

Combining these philosophies can go a long way, but they shouldn’t be confused as the same.

What makes up the JAMstack?

Back to the JAMstack: it’s typically comprised of 3 components: Javascript, APIs, and Markup. Its history stems from growing the term “static site” into something more meaningful (and marketable). So while ultimately a static site is the end result, it’s blown up to include first class tooling for every step of the way.

While there aren’t any specific set of tools that you need to use, or any tools at all beyond simple HTML, there are great examples of what can make up each part of the stack. Let’s dive in a little bit to each component.

Javascript

The component that’s probably done the most work to popularize the JAMstack is Javascript. Our favorite browser language allows us to provide all of the dynamic and interactive bits that we might not have if we’re serving plain HTML without it.

This is where a lot of times you’ll see UI frameworks like React, Vue, and newcomers like Svelte come into play.

They make building apps simpler and more organized by providing component APIs and tooling that compile down to a simple HTML file (or a bunch of them).

Those HTML files include a group of assets like images, CSS, and the actual JS that ultimately get served to a browser via your favorite CDN (content delivery network).

APIs

Utilizing the strengths of APIs is core to how you make a JAMstack app dynamic. Whether it’s authentication or search, your application will use Javascript to make an HTTP request to another provider which will ultimately enhance the experience in one form or another.

Gatsby coined the phrase “content mesh” that does a pretty good job at describing the possibilities here.

You don’t necessarily have to reach out to only one host for an API, but you can reach out to as many as you need (but try not to go overboard).

For instance, if you have a headless Wordpress API where you host your blog posts, a Cloudinary account where you store your specialized media, and an Elasticsearch instance that provides your search functionality, they all work together to provide a single experience to the people using your site.

Markup

This is the critical piece. Whether it’s your hand written HTML or the code that compiles down to the HTML, it’s the first part you’re serving to the client. This is kind of a de facto piece of any website, but how you serve it is the most important piece.

To be considered a JAMstack app, the HTML needs to be served statically, which basically means not being dynamically rendered from a server.

If you’re piecing a page together and serving it with PHP, it’s probably not a JAMstack app. If you upload and serve a single HTML file from storage that constructs an app with Javascript, it sounds like a JAMstack app.

But that doesn’t mean we have to always build 100% of the app within the browser. Tools like Gatsby and other static site generators allow us to pull in some or all of our API sources at build time and render the pages out as HTML files.

Think if you have a Wordpress blog, we can pull in all of the posts and ultimately create a new HTML file for each post. That means we’re going to be able to serve a precompiled version of the page directly to the browser which usually equates to a quicker first paint and faster experience for your visitor.

One note about “hosting”

Using the term hosting here can be misleading if you’re new to the concept. Yeah, your site is technically getting hosted somewhere, but it’s not in the traditional sense. You don’t have a server that you’re maintaining where you upload your files to with an FTP client like Cyberduck.

Instead, whether your doing it yourself with S3 or piping it into Netlify (which is actually multi-cloud), your HTML and static assets are getting served from object storage. On the tail end of that you typically have a CDN like Cloudflare which caches those files at locations all over the world making your pages load faster for the people visiting your site.

So what makes a JAMstack app so great?

JAMstack apps inherently satisfy most if not all of the 5 pillars of the AWS Well-Architected Framework. These are core concepts that AWS considers to deliver fast, secure, high-performing, resilient, and efficient infrastructure.

Let’s see how…

Speed

The fact that you’re serving JAMstack apps as static files directly from a CDN (usually) makes it likely your app is going to load super fast. Gone are the days where the server has to spend time building the page before responding; now you serve the page as just plain HTML “as is” or with some type of client side hydration like you’d see with React.

Cost

More often than not, JAMstack sites are going to run cheaper than their server side counterparts. Hosting static assets is cheap and now your page is being served at the same rate.

Scalability

Since you’re serving your files off of static hosting, likely a CDN, that pretty much automatically gives you infinite scalability. Most providers will make this claim, meaning you’ll have no trouble letting any influx of people hitting your site in through the front door.

Maintenance

The foundation of your static site isn’t a server, meaning you don’t need to maintain it. Whether it’s Netlify, S3, or any other provider, your static HTML, CSS, and JS are maintained for you headache-free.

Security

Doubling down on the lack of server that you have to personally maintain, you don’t really need to worry as much about locking down ways for people to intrude.

Instead, you’ll need to focus mostly on permissions to lock down private content and assure your users that their personal information isn’t publicly available.

But this also depends on your APIs

As much as these points strike true for the static aspects of your site, keep in mind you still might depend on some type of API for your client-side experience.

Try to take advantage of these requests at compile time when you can, such as with a static site generator. Otherwise you’ll need to weigh the amount of hits you’re making to a dynamic endpoint and how it impacts all of the points above for your overall experience.

Is my website considered to be on the JAMstack?

We already talked about the 3 components (Javascript, APIs, Markup), but what we didn’t talk about is the fact that you don’t necessarily have to use all 3 of them in order to consider your site worthy of the JAM label.

Really it all boils down to the Markup and how you serve it. Instead of your Rails app rendering your HTML for you, you might host a precompiled React app on S3 that reaches out to Rails via a set of APIs.

But you don’t even need to have APIs. You don’t even need to have Javascript! As long as you’re serving an HTML file without it having to be compiled on a server at request time (aka pre-rendering it), you’ve got yourself a JAMstack site.

What are some examples of JAMstack?

freecodecamp.org

Yes! freecodecamp.org and its learning portal is a JAMstack site built on Gatsby. Even with the complexities of providing an app to take code courses with, freeCodeCamp is able to pull together the power of a static site generator and powerful APIs to bring people around the world the power of learning code.

You can see Quincy from freeCodeCamp talk more about this at the 2018 JAMstack_conf:

Note: the News and Forum portals are not currently JAMstack sites.

Impossible Foods

The main website for Impossible Foods is no other than a Gatsby site! Everything from their recipes to their location finder are all compiled through our favorite “blazing fast” static site generator.

web.dev

Google’s web.dev resource center is built out using the growing 11ty. You can even find the code made open source at: https://github.com/GoogleChrome/web.dev

What are some tools I can use to build JAMstack sites or apps?

The good news with all of this buzz is there are a ton of tools currently available and a ton more on the way. They might still be a little rough around the edges, but that’s because this is a brave new world of tooling and that takes some smoothing out to get just right.

Constructing your app

This is the fun part. How are you going to build your app? With Scully in the picture, you can pretty much pick your favorite flavor of UI framework and get off the ground running. Here’s a few popular ones to get started, but by no means is it exhaustive.

Need me to pick one? Start with Gatsby and bootstrap with a simple starter.

Serving your app

I like to think of this as the easy part depending on your setup. Tools like Netlify and Zeit make this a breeze to configure by hooking into your Github repo and building anytime a new commit gets pushed, but of course you have options like AWS if you want more control.

Need me to pick one? Start with Netlify and take 5 minutes to deploy that Gatsby site.

Making your app dynamic

Really this can be anything that can be used as an API making requests from the browser. I’m not going to list a bunch of examples per type, but here are a few tools and places you can find some resources.

Originally published by Colby Fayock at https://www.freecodecamp.org

#javascript #web-development #api

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Everything you need to know to get started with JAMstack
Mrinal Raj

Mrinal Raj

1588649520

Everything You Need to Know to Get Started with JAMstack

When we first wrote this post, the JAMstack ecosystem was still in its infancy.

That was +/- 5 years ago.

Back then, the Netlify founders came to us with a proposition. They had just come up with the term “JAMstack” to work around the negative connotation of “static web” and were asking if we would help to promote it.

“Yeah, sure” answered a very half-convinced, greener Snipcart team.

jamstack? sure

Boy, are we grateful today to have witnessed firsthand the rise of this now vibrant community. It’s fair to say that we’ve played our part in this movement—crafting nearly fifty JAMstack-related blog posts & Github repositories with actionable, live demos.

The difference today is that this kind of content pops up everywhere! And don’t get me wrong, we’re all for it. It means the community is in good shape and growing stronger every year.

We plan to keep up providing valuable resources to new & seasoned JAMstack developers alike in 2020. It starts today with this update to our introduction post and what we think the year ahead has in store for devs.

I’ll cover:

  1. What the JAMstack is
  2. How to get started with it
  3. How to sell the JAMstack to clients
  4. What are the best resources to stay up-to-date
  5. What the Snipcart team is expecting from the JAMstack in 2020

Ready to JAM?

#jamstack #javascript #web-development

Carmen  Grimes

Carmen Grimes

1595494844

How to start an electric scooter facility/fleet in a university campus/IT park

Are you leading an organization that has a large campus, e.g., a large university? You are probably thinking of introducing an electric scooter/bicycle fleet on the campus, and why wouldn’t you?

Introducing micro-mobility in your campus with the help of such a fleet would help the people on the campus significantly. People would save money since they don’t need to use a car for a short distance. Your campus will see a drastic reduction in congestion, moreover, its carbon footprint will reduce.

Micro-mobility is relatively new though and you would need help. You would need to select an appropriate fleet of vehicles. The people on your campus would need to find electric scooters or electric bikes for commuting, and you need to provide a solution for this.

To be more specific, you need a short-term electric bike rental app. With such an app, you will be able to easily offer micro-mobility to the people on the campus. We at Devathon have built Autorent exactly for this.

What does Autorent do and how can it help you? How does it enable you to introduce micro-mobility on your campus? We explain these in this article, however, we will touch upon a few basics first.

Micro-mobility: What it is

micro-mobility

You are probably thinking about micro-mobility relatively recently, aren’t you? A few relevant insights about it could help you to better appreciate its importance.

Micro-mobility is a new trend in transportation, and it uses vehicles that are considerably smaller than cars. Electric scooters (e-scooters) and electric bikes (e-bikes) are the most popular forms of micro-mobility, however, there are also e-unicycles and e-skateboards.

You might have already seen e-scooters, which are kick scooters that come with a motor. Thanks to its motor, an e-scooter can achieve a speed of up to 20 km/h. On the other hand, e-bikes are popular in China and Japan, and they come with a motor, and you can reach a speed of 40 km/h.

You obviously can’t use these vehicles for very long commutes, however, what if you need to travel a short distance? Even if you have a reasonable public transport facility in the city, it might not cover the route you need to take. Take the example of a large university campus. Such a campus is often at a considerable distance from the central business district of the city where it’s located. While public transport facilities may serve the central business district, they wouldn’t serve this large campus. Currently, many people drive their cars even for short distances.

As you know, that brings its own set of challenges. Vehicular traffic adds significantly to pollution, moreover, finding a parking spot can be hard in crowded urban districts.

Well, you can reduce your carbon footprint if you use an electric car. However, electric cars are still new, and many countries are still building the necessary infrastructure for them. Your large campus might not have the necessary infrastructure for them either. Presently, electric cars don’t represent a viable option in most geographies.

As a result, you need to buy and maintain a car even if your commute is short. In addition to dealing with parking problems, you need to spend significantly on your car.

All of these factors have combined to make people sit up and think seriously about cars. Many people are now seriously considering whether a car is really the best option even if they have to commute only a short distance.

This is where micro-mobility enters the picture. When you commute a short distance regularly, e-scooters or e-bikes are viable options. You limit your carbon footprints and you cut costs!

Businesses have seen this shift in thinking, and e-scooter companies like Lime and Bird have entered this field in a big way. They let you rent e-scooters by the minute. On the other hand, start-ups like Jump and Lyft have entered the e-bike market.

Think of your campus now! The people there might need to travel short distances within the campus, and e-scooters can really help them.

How micro-mobility can benefit you

benefits-micromobility

What advantages can you get from micro-mobility? Let’s take a deeper look into this question.

Micro-mobility can offer several advantages to the people on your campus, e.g.:

  • Affordability: Shared e-scooters are cheaper than other mass transportation options. Remember that the people on your campus will use them on a shared basis, and they will pay for their short commutes only. Well, depending on your operating model, you might even let them use shared e-scooters or e-bikes for free!
  • Convenience: Users don’t need to worry about finding parking spots for shared e-scooters since these are small. They can easily travel from point A to point B on your campus with the help of these e-scooters.
  • Environmentally sustainable: Shared e-scooters reduce the carbon footprint, moreover, they decongest the roads. Statistics from the pilot programs in cities like Portland and Denver showimpressive gains around this key aspect.
  • Safety: This one’s obvious, isn’t it? When people on your campus use small e-scooters or e-bikes instead of cars, the problem of overspeeding will disappear. you will see fewer accidents.

#android app #autorent #ios app #mobile app development #app like bird #app like bounce #app like lime #autorent #bird scooter business model #bird scooter rental #bird scooter rental cost #bird scooter rental price #clone app like bird #clone app like bounce #clone app like lime #electric rental scooters #electric scooter company #electric scooter rental business #how do you start a moped #how to start a moped #how to start a scooter rental business #how to start an electric company #how to start electric scooterrental business #lime scooter business model #scooter franchise #scooter rental business #scooter rental business for sale #scooter rental business insurance #scooters franchise cost #white label app like bird #white label app like bounce #white label app like lime

How to Get Current URL in Laravel

In this small post we will see how to get current url in laravel, if you want to get current page url in laravel then we can use many method such type current(), full(), request(), url().

Here i will give you all example to get current page url in laravel, in this example i have used helper and function as well as so let’s start example of how to get current url id in laravel.

Read More : How to Get Current URL in Laravel

https://websolutionstuff.com/post/how-to-get-current-url-in-laravel


Read More : Laravel Signature Pad Example

https://websolutionstuff.com/post/laravel-signature-pad-example

#how to get current url in laravel #laravel get current url #get current page url in laravel #find current url in laravel #get full url in laravel #how to get current url id in laravel

Ian  Robinson

Ian Robinson

1624434540

Everything You Need to Know about Apache Storm

The ever-increasing growth in the production and analytics of Big Data keeps presenting new challenges, and the data scientists and programmers gracefully take it in their stride – by constantly improving the applications developed by them. One such problem was that of real-time streaming. Real-time data holds extremely high value for businesses, but it has a time-window after which it loses its value – an expiry date, if you will. If the value of this real-time data is not realised within the window, no usable information can be extracted from it. This real-time data comes in quickly and continuously, therefore the term “Streaming”.

Analytics of this real-time data can help you stay updated on what’s happening right now, such as the number of people reading your blog post, or the number of people visiting your Facebook page. Although it might sound like just a “nice-to-have” feature, in practice, It is essential. Imagine you’re a part of an Ad Agency performing real-time analytics on your ad-campaigns – that the client paid heavily for. Real-time analytics can keep you posted on how is your Ad performing in the market, how the users are responding to it, and other things of that nature. Quite an essential tool if you think of it this way, right?

Looking at the value that real-time data holds, organisations started coming up with various real-time data analytics tools. In this article, we’ll be talking about one of those – Apache Storm. We’ll look at what it is, the architecture of a typical storm application, it’s core components (also known as abstractions), and its real life-use cases.

Let’s go!

Table of Contents

#big data #data #technical skills #technology #everything you need to know about apache storm #apache storm

Everything you need to know to get started with JAMstack

JAMstack sites are all the rage right now in the web dev world. And rightfully so! But what exactly is it and how can we all take advantage of its benefits?

  • What is this JAMstack?
  • That’s not to be confused with serverless
  • What makes up the JAMstack?
  • So what makes a JAMstack app so great?
  • Is my website considered to be on the JAMstack?
  • What are some examples of JAMstack?
  • What are some tools I can use to build JAMstack sites or apps?

What is this JAMstack?

To start, JAMstack is a software architecture and philosophy that adheres to the following components: Javascript, APIs, and Markup.

If this sounds familiar, it’s because it is! That React app that you compile down with Webpack and ultimately serve from S3? Yup, that’s a JAMstack app. That simple HTML file that has no JavaScript and literally doesn’t do anything dynamic? Yup, that’s also a JAMstack app.

That’s not to be confused with serverless

If you’re coming more from the cloud side of things (think AWS, GCP, Azure), you might be inclined to think of serverless and JAMstack as the name thing. Granted they have similarities in the philosophy of how resources are managed, such as hosting a site on S3. But a JAMstack app is not always going to be a serverless app.

Consider an app hosted in static storage on the cloud provider of your choice. Yes, you might be serving the app in a serverless way, but you might be dealing with an API that utilizes Wordpress or Rails, both of which are certainly not serverless.

Combining these philosophies can go a long way, but they shouldn’t be confused as the same.

What makes up the JAMstack?

Back to the JAMstack: it’s typically comprised of 3 components: Javascript, APIs, and Markup. Its history stems from growing the term “static site” into something more meaningful (and marketable). So while ultimately a static site is the end result, it’s blown up to include first class tooling for every step of the way.

While there aren’t any specific set of tools that you need to use, or any tools at all beyond simple HTML, there are great examples of what can make up each part of the stack. Let’s dive in a little bit to each component.

Javascript

The component that’s probably done the most work to popularize the JAMstack is Javascript. Our favorite browser language allows us to provide all of the dynamic and interactive bits that we might not have if we’re serving plain HTML without it.

This is where a lot of times you’ll see UI frameworks like React, Vue, and newcomers like Svelte come into play.

They make building apps simpler and more organized by providing component APIs and tooling that compile down to a simple HTML file (or a bunch of them).

Those HTML files include a group of assets like images, CSS, and the actual JS that ultimately get served to a browser via your favorite CDN (content delivery network).

APIs

Utilizing the strengths of APIs is core to how you make a JAMstack app dynamic. Whether it’s authentication or search, your application will use Javascript to make an HTTP request to another provider which will ultimately enhance the experience in one form or another.

Gatsby coined the phrase “content mesh” that does a pretty good job at describing the possibilities here.

You don’t necessarily have to reach out to only one host for an API, but you can reach out to as many as you need (but try not to go overboard).

For instance, if you have a headless Wordpress API where you host your blog posts, a Cloudinary account where you store your specialized media, and an Elasticsearch instance that provides your search functionality, they all work together to provide a single experience to the people using your site.

Markup

This is the critical piece. Whether it’s your hand written HTML or the code that compiles down to the HTML, it’s the first part you’re serving to the client. This is kind of a de facto piece of any website, but how you serve it is the most important piece.

To be considered a JAMstack app, the HTML needs to be served statically, which basically means not being dynamically rendered from a server.

If you’re piecing a page together and serving it with PHP, it’s probably not a JAMstack app. If you upload and serve a single HTML file from storage that constructs an app with Javascript, it sounds like a JAMstack app.

But that doesn’t mean we have to always build 100% of the app within the browser. Tools like Gatsby and other static site generators allow us to pull in some or all of our API sources at build time and render the pages out as HTML files.

Think if you have a Wordpress blog, we can pull in all of the posts and ultimately create a new HTML file for each post. That means we’re going to be able to serve a precompiled version of the page directly to the browser which usually equates to a quicker first paint and faster experience for your visitor.

One note about “hosting”

Using the term hosting here can be misleading if you’re new to the concept. Yeah, your site is technically getting hosted somewhere, but it’s not in the traditional sense. You don’t have a server that you’re maintaining where you upload your files to with an FTP client like Cyberduck.

Instead, whether your doing it yourself with S3 or piping it into Netlify (which is actually multi-cloud), your HTML and static assets are getting served from object storage. On the tail end of that you typically have a CDN like Cloudflare which caches those files at locations all over the world making your pages load faster for the people visiting your site.

So what makes a JAMstack app so great?

JAMstack apps inherently satisfy most if not all of the 5 pillars of the AWS Well-Architected Framework. These are core concepts that AWS considers to deliver fast, secure, high-performing, resilient, and efficient infrastructure.

Let’s see how…

Speed

The fact that you’re serving JAMstack apps as static files directly from a CDN (usually) makes it likely your app is going to load super fast. Gone are the days where the server has to spend time building the page before responding; now you serve the page as just plain HTML “as is” or with some type of client side hydration like you’d see with React.

Cost

More often than not, JAMstack sites are going to run cheaper than their server side counterparts. Hosting static assets is cheap and now your page is being served at the same rate.

Scalability

Since you’re serving your files off of static hosting, likely a CDN, that pretty much automatically gives you infinite scalability. Most providers will make this claim, meaning you’ll have no trouble letting any influx of people hitting your site in through the front door.

Maintenance

The foundation of your static site isn’t a server, meaning you don’t need to maintain it. Whether it’s Netlify, S3, or any other provider, your static HTML, CSS, and JS are maintained for you headache-free.

Security

Doubling down on the lack of server that you have to personally maintain, you don’t really need to worry as much about locking down ways for people to intrude.

Instead, you’ll need to focus mostly on permissions to lock down private content and assure your users that their personal information isn’t publicly available.

But this also depends on your APIs

As much as these points strike true for the static aspects of your site, keep in mind you still might depend on some type of API for your client-side experience.

Try to take advantage of these requests at compile time when you can, such as with a static site generator. Otherwise you’ll need to weigh the amount of hits you’re making to a dynamic endpoint and how it impacts all of the points above for your overall experience.

Is my website considered to be on the JAMstack?

We already talked about the 3 components (Javascript, APIs, Markup), but what we didn’t talk about is the fact that you don’t necessarily have to use all 3 of them in order to consider your site worthy of the JAM label.

Really it all boils down to the Markup and how you serve it. Instead of your Rails app rendering your HTML for you, you might host a precompiled React app on S3 that reaches out to Rails via a set of APIs.

But you don’t even need to have APIs. You don’t even need to have Javascript! As long as you’re serving an HTML file without it having to be compiled on a server at request time (aka pre-rendering it), you’ve got yourself a JAMstack site.

What are some examples of JAMstack?

freecodecamp.org

Yes! freecodecamp.org and its learning portal is a JAMstack site built on Gatsby. Even with the complexities of providing an app to take code courses with, freeCodeCamp is able to pull together the power of a static site generator and powerful APIs to bring people around the world the power of learning code.

You can see Quincy from freeCodeCamp talk more about this at the 2018 JAMstack_conf:

Note: the News and Forum portals are not currently JAMstack sites.

Impossible Foods

The main website for Impossible Foods is no other than a Gatsby site! Everything from their recipes to their location finder are all compiled through our favorite “blazing fast” static site generator.

web.dev

Google’s web.dev resource center is built out using the growing 11ty. You can even find the code made open source at: https://github.com/GoogleChrome/web.dev

What are some tools I can use to build JAMstack sites or apps?

The good news with all of this buzz is there are a ton of tools currently available and a ton more on the way. They might still be a little rough around the edges, but that’s because this is a brave new world of tooling and that takes some smoothing out to get just right.

Constructing your app

This is the fun part. How are you going to build your app? With Scully in the picture, you can pretty much pick your favorite flavor of UI framework and get off the ground running. Here’s a few popular ones to get started, but by no means is it exhaustive.

Need me to pick one? Start with Gatsby and bootstrap with a simple starter.

Serving your app

I like to think of this as the easy part depending on your setup. Tools like Netlify and Zeit make this a breeze to configure by hooking into your Github repo and building anytime a new commit gets pushed, but of course you have options like AWS if you want more control.

Need me to pick one? Start with Netlify and take 5 minutes to deploy that Gatsby site.

Making your app dynamic

Really this can be anything that can be used as an API making requests from the browser. I’m not going to list a bunch of examples per type, but here are a few tools and places you can find some resources.

Originally published by Colby Fayock at https://www.freecodecamp.org

#javascript #web-development #api