Colleen  Little

Colleen Little

1603686464

Object Indexing in React

Stop Overusing Array Functions

JavaScript array methods can be pretty convenient, but sometimes they can be overused. These array functions are easy to recall and the small amount of code/reduced complexity may lead a developer to rely too heavily on them when they may not be the most efficient method. Which brings us to the topic of this post, object indexing.

Indexing allows us to associate an object in a collection with a certain number (or index) that is associated with it. Similar to how an item in array can be accessed by using the index of that item, you can index items in an object to make them accessible at a certain key. See the collection of objects below, first as an array, then as an object.

Array
[{id: 1, name: "test 1", createdAt: "Sunday Oct 25 2020", "color": "red"}, {id: 2, name: "test 2", createdAt: "Monday Oct 26 2020",  color: "blue"}, ...]Object
{1: {id: 1, name: "test 1", createdAt: "Sunday Oct 25 2020", color: "red"}, 2: {id: 2, name: "test 2", createdAt: "Monday Oct 26 2020",  color: "blue"}, ...}

In the array example, you can access the second item in the array but writing array[1]. In the object example, you can access the second item in the object by writing object[2].

So how can indexing help us in React?

Imagine the scenario where you have a collection of items in an array. These items are rendered as options in a select element. Beneath the select element, you have a display component that renders the selected item’s properties (id, name, createdAt, color). See the example below.

Image for post

We can write an onChange method for the select element that utilizes the good ol’ find array method to update the current item. Something like this:

const findItem = (e) =>{
  var newItem = items.find(x=>x.id === e.target.value)
  setItem(newItem) 
};

This works fine, but what if the dataset was much larger? Or what if the operations become more complex? What if the value you’re looking for is a child of one of the objects in the collection?

The point I’m trying to make is that despite find not being significantly inefficient for our current use case, it can become less efficient when the complexity of an app or the size of the dataset increases. Object indexing can provide a quick and efficient method for accessing items in a collection. See the Items component below.

import {useState, useEffect} from 'react';
import '../App.css';
import SelectedItem from './SelectedItem';
import items from '../items.json';const Items = () =>{

  const [item, setItem] = useState(items[0])  const onChangeItem = (e)=>{
    var id = e.target.value
    findItem(id)
  }  const findItem = (id) =>{
    var newItem = items.find(x=>x.id === id)
    setItem(newItem)
  };  return (<div>
    Items: <select style={{width: 200}} value={item.id} onChange={onChangeItem}>
      {items.map(x=>{
        return <option key={x.id} value={x.id}>{x.name}</option>
      })}
    </select>
    <SelectedItem item={item}/>
  </div>);
};export default Items;

#javascript #programming #react #web-development #developer

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Object Indexing in React
Arvel  Parker

Arvel Parker

1591611780

How to Find Ulimit For user on Linux

How can I find the correct ulimit values for a user account or process on Linux systems?

For proper operation, we must ensure that the correct ulimit values set after installing various software. The Linux system provides means of restricting the number of resources that can be used. Limits set for each Linux user account. However, system limits are applied separately to each process that is running for that user too. For example, if certain thresholds are too low, the system might not be able to server web pages using Nginx/Apache or PHP/Python app. System resource limits viewed or set with the NA command. Let us see how to use the ulimit that provides control over the resources available to the shell and processes.

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MEAN Stack Tutorial MongoDB ExpressJS AngularJS NodeJS

We are going to build a full stack Todo App using the MEAN (MongoDB, ExpressJS, AngularJS and NodeJS). This is the last part of three-post series tutorial.

MEAN Stack tutorial series:

AngularJS tutorial for beginners (Part I)
Creating RESTful APIs with NodeJS and MongoDB Tutorial (Part II)
MEAN Stack Tutorial: MongoDB, ExpressJS, AngularJS and NodeJS (Part III) 👈 you are here
Before completing the app, let’s cover some background about the this stack. If you rather jump to the hands-on part click here to get started.

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Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1598839687

How native is React Native? | React Native vs Native App Development

If you are undertaking a mobile app development for your start-up or enterprise, you are likely wondering whether to use React Native. As a popular development framework, React Native helps you to develop near-native mobile apps. However, you are probably also wondering how close you can get to a native app by using React Native. How native is React Native?

In the article, we discuss the similarities between native mobile development and development using React Native. We also touch upon where they differ and how to bridge the gaps. Read on.

A brief introduction to React Native

Let’s briefly set the context first. We will briefly touch upon what React Native is and how it differs from earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is a popular JavaScript framework that Facebook has created. You can use this open-source framework to code natively rendering Android and iOS mobile apps. You can use it to develop web apps too.

Facebook has developed React Native based on React, its JavaScript library. The first release of React Native came in March 2015. At the time of writing this article, the latest stable release of React Native is 0.62.0, and it was released in March 2020.

Although relatively new, React Native has acquired a high degree of popularity. The “Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2019” report identifies it as the 8th most loved framework. Facebook, Walmart, and Bloomberg are some of the top companies that use React Native.

The popularity of React Native comes from its advantages. Some of its advantages are as follows:

  • Performance: It delivers optimal performance.
  • Cross-platform development: You can develop both Android and iOS apps with it. The reuse of code expedites development and reduces costs.
  • UI design: React Native enables you to design simple and responsive UI for your mobile app.
  • 3rd party plugins: This framework supports 3rd party plugins.
  • Developer community: A vibrant community of developers support React Native.

Why React Native is fundamentally different from earlier hybrid frameworks

Are you wondering whether React Native is just another of those hybrid frameworks like Ionic or Cordova? It’s not! React Native is fundamentally different from these earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is very close to native. Consider the following aspects as described on the React Native website:

  • Access to many native platforms features: The primitives of React Native render to native platform UI. This means that your React Native app will use many native platform APIs as native apps would do.
  • Near-native user experience: React Native provides several native components, and these are platform agnostic.
  • The ease of accessing native APIs: React Native uses a declarative UI paradigm. This enables React Native to interact easily with native platform APIs since React Native wraps existing native code.

Due to these factors, React Native offers many more advantages compared to those earlier hybrid frameworks. We now review them.

#android app #frontend #ios app #mobile app development #benefits of react native #is react native good for mobile app development #native vs #pros and cons of react native #react mobile development #react native development #react native experience #react native framework #react native ios vs android #react native pros and cons #react native vs android #react native vs native #react native vs native performance #react vs native #why react native #why use react native

systemctl List All Failed Units/Services on Linux

Is there is a command to print list all failed units or services when using systemd on Linux? Can you tell me the systemctl command to list all failed services on Linux?

This quick tutorial explains how to find/list all failed systemd services/units on Linux operating systems using the systemctl command.

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Brain  Crist

Brain Crist

1595434320

Docker Applikationen mit Visual Studio Code debuggen

Mit dem integrierten Debugger von Visual Studio Code lassen sich ASP.NET Core bzw. .NET Core Applikationen einfach und problemlos debuggen. Der Debugger unterstützt auch Remote Debugging, somit lassen sich zum Beispiel .NET Core Programme, die in einem Docker-Container laufen, debuggen.

Als Beispiel Applikation reicht das Default-Template für MVC Applikationen dotnet new mvc

$ md docker-core-debugger
$ cd docker-core-debugger
$ dotnet new mvc

Mit dotnet run prüfen wir kurz, ob die Applikation läuft und unter der Adresse http://localhost:5000 erreichbar ist.

$ dotnet run
$ Hosting environment: Production
$ Content root path: D:\Temp\docker-aspnetcore
$ Now listening on: http://localhost:5000

Die .NET Core Applikation builden wir mit dotnet build und publishen alles mit Hilfe von dotnet publish

$ dotnet build
$ dotnet publish -c Debug -o out --runtime linux-x64

Dabei gilt es zu beachten, dass die Build Configuration mit -c Debug gesetzt ist und das Output Directory auf -o out. Sonst findet Docker die nötigen Binaries nicht. Für den Docker Container brauchen wir nun ein Dockerfile, dass beim Start vorgängig den .NET Core command line debugger (VSDBG) installiert. Das Installations-Script für VSDBG ist unter https://aka.ms/getvsdbgsh abfrufbar.

FROM microsoft/aspnetcore:latest
WORKDIR /app

RUN apt-get update \
    && apt-get install -y --no-install-recommends \
       unzip procps \
    && rm -rf /var/lib/apt/lists/* \
    && curl -sSL https://aka.ms/getvsdbgsh | bash /dev/stdin -v latest -l /vsdbg

COPY ./out .
ENTRYPOINT ["dotnet", "docker-core-debugger.dll"]

Den Docker Container erstellen wir mit dem docker build Kommando

$ docker build -t coreapp .

und starten die Applikation mit docker run.

$ docker run -d -p 8080:80 --name coreapp coreapp

Jetzt muss Visual Studio Code nur noch wissen, wo unsere Applikation läuft. Dazu definieren wir eine launch.json vom Typ attach und konfigurieren die nötigen Parameter für den Debugger.

{
    "version": "0.2.0",
    "configurations": [
         {
            "name": ".NET Core Remote Attach",
            "type": "coreclr",
            "request": "attach",
            "processId": "${command:pickRemoteProcess}",
            "pipeTransport": {
                "pipeProgram": "docker",
                "pipeArgs": ["exec", "-i coreapp ${debuggerCommand}"],
                "quoteArgs": false,
                "debuggerPath": "/vsdbg/vsdbg",
                "pipeCwd": "${workspaceRoot}"
            },

            "logging": {
                "engineLogging": true,
                "exceptions": true,
                "moduleLoad": true,
                "programOutput": true
            },
        }
    ]
}

Mit F5 starten wir den Debugger. Wenn alles klappt, sollte eine Auswahl der Prozesse des Docker-Containers sichtbar sein.

vscode

Nun muss der dotnet Prozess ausgewählt werden. Der Visual Studio Code Debugger verbindet sich darauf mit VSDBG und wir können wie gewohnt unseren Code debuggen. Dazu setzen wir einen Breakpoint in der Index-Action des HomeControllers und rufen mit dem Browser die URL http://localhost:8080/ auf.

vscode

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