Should use CSS, jQuery or React to Filtering Data Client-Side

Should use CSS, jQuery or React to Filtering Data Client-Side

Filtering Data Client-Side. Let's look at how we might do that with different technologies is CSS, jQuery, and React

Say you have a list of 100 names:

<ul>
  <li>Randy Hilpert</li>
  <li>Peggie Jacobi</li>
  <li>Ethelyn Nolan Sr.</li> 
  <!-- and then some -->
</ul>

...or file names, or phone numbers, or whatever. And you want to filter them client-side, meaning you aren't making a server-side request to search through data and return results. You just want to type "rand" and have it filter the list to include "Randy Hilpert" and "Danika Randall" because they both have that string of characters in them. Everything else isn't included in the results.

Let's look at how we might do that with different technologies.

CSS: can sorta do it, with a little help.

CSS can't select things based on the content they contain, but it can select on attributes and the values of those attributes. So let's move the names into attributes as well.

<ul>
  <li data-name="Randy Hilpert">Randy Hilpert</li>
  <li data-name="Peggie Jacobi">Peggie Jacobi</li>
  <li data-name="Ethelyn Nolan Sr.">Ethelyn Nolan Sr.</li> 
  ...
</ul>

Now to filter that list for names that contain "rand", it's very easy:

li {
  display: none;
}
li[data-name*="rand" i] {
  display: list-item;
}

Note the i on Line 4. That means "case insensitive" which is very useful here.

To make this work dynamically with a filter <input>, we'll need to get JavaScript involved to not only react to the filter being typed in, but generate CSS that matches what is being searched.

Say we have a <style> block sitting on the page:

<style id="cssFilter">
  /* dynamically generated CSS will be put in here */
</style>

We can watch for changes on our filter input and generate that CSS:

filterElement.addEventListener("input", e => {
  let filter = e.target.value;
  let css = filter ? `
    li {
      display: none;
    }
    li[data-name*="${filter}" i] {
      display: list-item;
    }
  ` : ``;
  window.cssFilter.innerHTML = css;
});

Note that we're emptying out the style block when the filter is empty, so all results show.

jQuery: makes it even easier.

Since we need JavaScript anyway, perhaps jQuery is an acceptable tool. There are two notable changes here:

  • jQuery can select items based on the content they contain. It has a selector API just for this. We don't need the extra attribute anymore.
  • This keeps all the filtering to a single technology.

We still watch the input for typing, then if we have a filter term, we hide all the list items and reveal the ones that contain our filter term. Otherwise, we reveal them all again:

const listItems = $("li");

$("#filter").on("input", function() {
  let filter = $(this).val();
  if (filter) {
    listItems.hide();
    $(`li:contains('${filter}')`).show();
  } else {
    listItems.show();
  }
});

It's takes more fiddling to make the filter case-insensitive than CSS does, but we can do it by overriding the default method:

jQuery.expr[':'].contains = function(a, i, m) {
  return jQuery(a).text().toUpperCase()
      .indexOf(m[3].toUpperCase()) >= 0;
};

React: can do it with state and rendering only what it needs.

There is no one-true-way to do this in React, but I would think it's React-y to keep the list of names as data (like an Array), map over them, and only render what you need. Changes in the input filter the data itself and React re-renders as necessary.

If we have an names = [array, of, names], we can filter it pretty easily:

filteredNames = names.filter(name => {
  return name.includes(filter);
});

This time, case sensitivity can be done like this:

filteredNames = names.filter(name => {
  return name.toUpperCase().includes(filter.toUpperCase());
});

Then we'd do the typical .map() thing in JSX to loop over our array and output the names.

I don't have any particular preference

This isn't the kind of thing you choose a technology for. You do it in whatever technology you already have. I also don't think any one approach is particularly heavier than the rest in terms of technical debt.

Thanks for reading! Please share if you liked it!

Originally published on css-tricks.com

css jquery reactjs database web-development

Bootstrap 5 Complete Course with Examples

Bootstrap 5 Tutorial - Bootstrap 5 Crash Course for Beginners

Nest.JS Tutorial for Beginners

Hello Vue 3: A First Look at Vue 3 and the Composition API

Building a simple Applications with Vue 3

Deno Crash Course: Explore Deno and Create a full REST API with Deno

How to Build a Real-time Chat App with Deno and WebSockets

Convert HTML to Markdown Online

HTML entity encoder decoder Online

Hire CSS Developer

Want to develop a website or re-design using CSS Development? We build a website and we implemented CSS successfully if you are planning to **[Hire CSS Developer](https://hourlydeveloper.io/hire-dedicated-css-developer/ "Hire CSS Developer")**...

Hire Web Developer

Looking for an attractive & user-friendly web developer? HourlyDeveloper.io, a leading web, and mobile app development company, offers web developers for hire through flexible engagement models. You can **[Hire Web...

ReactJS Web App Development Services

We provide top-notch ReactJS development services to global clients. Hire expert ReactJS developers from top React JS development company, Skenix Infotech.

Why Web Development is Important for your Business

With the rapid development in technology, the old ways to do business have changed completely. A lot more advanced and developed ways are ...

Important Reasons to Hire a Professional Web Development Company

    You name the business and I will tell you how web development can help you promote your business. If it is a startup or you seeking some...