Mary  Turcotte

Mary Turcotte

1665889560

Foundry Rust Monorepo Template

Foundry Rust Monorepo Template  

Template for quickly getting started with developing Rust applications that leverage Foundry for EVM smart contract development.

Continuous Integration is already set up to test both your Rust and Solidity code, as well as ensure formatting and that your Rust bindings match the Solidity build artifacts.

Directory Structure

The project is structured as a mixed Rust workspace with a Foundry project under contracts/ and typesafe auto-generated bindings to the contracts under bindings/.

├── Cargo.toml
├── app // <-- Your Rust application logic
├── contracts // <- The smart contracts + tests using Foundry
├── bindings // <-- Generated bindings to the smart contracts' abis (like Typechain)

Testing

Given the repository contains both Solidity and Rust code, there's 2 different workflows.

Solidity

Forge is using submodules to manage dependencies. Initialize the dependencies:

forge install

If you are in the root directory of the project, run:

forge test --root ./contracts

If you are in in contracts/:

forge test

Rust

cargo test

Generating Rust bindings to the contracts

Rust bindings to the contracts can be generated via forge bind, which requires first building your contracts:

forge build --root ./contracts
forge bind --bindings-path ./bindings --root ./contracts --crate-name bindings

Any follow-on calls to forge bind will check that the generated bindings match the ones under the build files. If you want to re-generate your bindings, pass the --overwrite flag to your forge bind command.

Installing Foundry

First run the command below to get foundryup, the Foundry toolchain installer:

curl -L https://foundry.paradigm.xyz | bash

Then, in a new terminal session or after reloading your PATH, run it to get the latest forge and cast binaries:

foundryup

For more, see the official docs.


Download Details:

Author: gakonst
Source Code: https://github.com/gakonst/foundry-rust-template

#rust 

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Foundry Rust Monorepo Template

Serde Rust: Serialization Framework for Rust

Serde

*Serde is a framework for serializing and deserializing Rust data structures efficiently and generically.*

You may be looking for:

Serde in action

Click to show Cargo.toml. Run this code in the playground.

[dependencies]

# The core APIs, including the Serialize and Deserialize traits. Always
# required when using Serde. The "derive" feature is only required when
# using #[derive(Serialize, Deserialize)] to make Serde work with structs
# and enums defined in your crate.
serde = { version = "1.0", features = ["derive"] }

# Each data format lives in its own crate; the sample code below uses JSON
# but you may be using a different one.
serde_json = "1.0"

 

use serde::{Serialize, Deserialize};

#[derive(Serialize, Deserialize, Debug)]
struct Point {
    x: i32,
    y: i32,
}

fn main() {
    let point = Point { x: 1, y: 2 };

    // Convert the Point to a JSON string.
    let serialized = serde_json::to_string(&point).unwrap();

    // Prints serialized = {"x":1,"y":2}
    println!("serialized = {}", serialized);

    // Convert the JSON string back to a Point.
    let deserialized: Point = serde_json::from_str(&serialized).unwrap();

    // Prints deserialized = Point { x: 1, y: 2 }
    println!("deserialized = {:?}", deserialized);
}

Getting help

Serde is one of the most widely used Rust libraries so any place that Rustaceans congregate will be able to help you out. For chat, consider trying the #rust-questions or #rust-beginners channels of the unofficial community Discord (invite: https://discord.gg/rust-lang-community), the #rust-usage or #beginners channels of the official Rust Project Discord (invite: https://discord.gg/rust-lang), or the #general stream in Zulip. For asynchronous, consider the [rust] tag on StackOverflow, the /r/rust subreddit which has a pinned weekly easy questions post, or the Rust Discourse forum. It's acceptable to file a support issue in this repo but they tend not to get as many eyes as any of the above and may get closed without a response after some time.

Download Details:
Author: serde-rs
Source Code: https://github.com/serde-rs/serde
License: View license

#rust  #rustlang 

Awesome  Rust

Awesome Rust

1654894080

Serde JSON: JSON Support for Serde Framework

Serde JSON

Serde is a framework for serializing and deserializing Rust data structures efficiently and generically.

[dependencies]
serde_json = "1.0"

You may be looking for:

JSON is a ubiquitous open-standard format that uses human-readable text to transmit data objects consisting of key-value pairs.

{
    "name": "John Doe",
    "age": 43,
    "address": {
        "street": "10 Downing Street",
        "city": "London"
    },
    "phones": [
        "+44 1234567",
        "+44 2345678"
    ]
}

There are three common ways that you might find yourself needing to work with JSON data in Rust.

  • As text data. An unprocessed string of JSON data that you receive on an HTTP endpoint, read from a file, or prepare to send to a remote server.
  • As an untyped or loosely typed representation. Maybe you want to check that some JSON data is valid before passing it on, but without knowing the structure of what it contains. Or you want to do very basic manipulations like insert a key in a particular spot.
  • As a strongly typed Rust data structure. When you expect all or most of your data to conform to a particular structure and want to get real work done without JSON's loosey-goosey nature tripping you up.

Serde JSON provides efficient, flexible, safe ways of converting data between each of these representations.

Operating on untyped JSON values

Any valid JSON data can be manipulated in the following recursive enum representation. This data structure is serde_json::Value.

enum Value {
    Null,
    Bool(bool),
    Number(Number),
    String(String),
    Array(Vec<Value>),
    Object(Map<String, Value>),
}

A string of JSON data can be parsed into a serde_json::Value by the serde_json::from_str function. There is also from_slice for parsing from a byte slice &[u8] and from_reader for parsing from any io::Read like a File or a TCP stream.

use serde_json::{Result, Value};

fn untyped_example() -> Result<()> {
    // Some JSON input data as a &str. Maybe this comes from the user.
    let data = r#"
        {
            "name": "John Doe",
            "age": 43,
            "phones": [
                "+44 1234567",
                "+44 2345678"
            ]
        }"#;

    // Parse the string of data into serde_json::Value.
    let v: Value = serde_json::from_str(data)?;

    // Access parts of the data by indexing with square brackets.
    println!("Please call {} at the number {}", v["name"], v["phones"][0]);

    Ok(())
}

The result of square bracket indexing like v["name"] is a borrow of the data at that index, so the type is &Value. A JSON map can be indexed with string keys, while a JSON array can be indexed with integer keys. If the type of the data is not right for the type with which it is being indexed, or if a map does not contain the key being indexed, or if the index into a vector is out of bounds, the returned element is Value::Null.

When a Value is printed, it is printed as a JSON string. So in the code above, the output looks like Please call "John Doe" at the number "+44 1234567". The quotation marks appear because v["name"] is a &Value containing a JSON string and its JSON representation is "John Doe". Printing as a plain string without quotation marks involves converting from a JSON string to a Rust string with as_str() or avoiding the use of Value as described in the following section.

The Value representation is sufficient for very basic tasks but can be tedious to work with for anything more significant. Error handling is verbose to implement correctly, for example imagine trying to detect the presence of unrecognized fields in the input data. The compiler is powerless to help you when you make a mistake, for example imagine typoing v["name"] as v["nmae"] in one of the dozens of places it is used in your code.

Parsing JSON as strongly typed data structures

Serde provides a powerful way of mapping JSON data into Rust data structures largely automatically.

use serde::{Deserialize, Serialize};
use serde_json::Result;

#[derive(Serialize, Deserialize)]
struct Person {
    name: String,
    age: u8,
    phones: Vec<String>,
}

fn typed_example() -> Result<()> {
    // Some JSON input data as a &str. Maybe this comes from the user.
    let data = r#"
        {
            "name": "John Doe",
            "age": 43,
            "phones": [
                "+44 1234567",
                "+44 2345678"
            ]
        }"#;

    // Parse the string of data into a Person object. This is exactly the
    // same function as the one that produced serde_json::Value above, but
    // now we are asking it for a Person as output.
    let p: Person = serde_json::from_str(data)?;

    // Do things just like with any other Rust data structure.
    println!("Please call {} at the number {}", p.name, p.phones[0]);

    Ok(())
}

This is the same serde_json::from_str function as before, but this time we assign the return value to a variable of type Person so Serde will automatically interpret the input data as a Person and produce informative error messages if the layout does not conform to what a Person is expected to look like.

Any type that implements Serde's Deserialize trait can be deserialized this way. This includes built-in Rust standard library types like Vec<T> and HashMap<K, V>, as well as any structs or enums annotated with #[derive(Deserialize)].

Once we have p of type Person, our IDE and the Rust compiler can help us use it correctly like they do for any other Rust code. The IDE can autocomplete field names to prevent typos, which was impossible in the serde_json::Value representation. And the Rust compiler can check that when we write p.phones[0], then p.phones is guaranteed to be a Vec<String> so indexing into it makes sense and produces a String.

The necessary setup for using Serde's derive macros is explained on the Using derive page of the Serde site.

Constructing JSON values

Serde JSON provides a json! macro to build serde_json::Value objects with very natural JSON syntax.

use serde_json::json;

fn main() {
    // The type of `john` is `serde_json::Value`
    let john = json!({
        "name": "John Doe",
        "age": 43,
        "phones": [
            "+44 1234567",
            "+44 2345678"
        ]
    });

    println!("first phone number: {}", john["phones"][0]);

    // Convert to a string of JSON and print it out
    println!("{}", john.to_string());
}

The Value::to_string() function converts a serde_json::Value into a String of JSON text.

One neat thing about the json! macro is that variables and expressions can be interpolated directly into the JSON value as you are building it. Serde will check at compile time that the value you are interpolating is able to be represented as JSON.

let full_name = "John Doe";
let age_last_year = 42;

// The type of `john` is `serde_json::Value`
let john = json!({
    "name": full_name,
    "age": age_last_year + 1,
    "phones": [
        format!("+44 {}", random_phone())
    ]
});

This is amazingly convenient, but we have the problem we had before with Value: the IDE and Rust compiler cannot help us if we get it wrong. Serde JSON provides a better way of serializing strongly-typed data structures into JSON text.

Creating JSON by serializing data structures

A data structure can be converted to a JSON string by serde_json::to_string. There is also serde_json::to_vec which serializes to a Vec<u8> and serde_json::to_writer which serializes to any io::Write such as a File or a TCP stream.

use serde::{Deserialize, Serialize};
use serde_json::Result;

#[derive(Serialize, Deserialize)]
struct Address {
    street: String,
    city: String,
}

fn print_an_address() -> Result<()> {
    // Some data structure.
    let address = Address {
        street: "10 Downing Street".to_owned(),
        city: "London".to_owned(),
    };

    // Serialize it to a JSON string.
    let j = serde_json::to_string(&address)?;

    // Print, write to a file, or send to an HTTP server.
    println!("{}", j);

    Ok(())
}

Any type that implements Serde's Serialize trait can be serialized this way. This includes built-in Rust standard library types like Vec<T> and HashMap<K, V>, as well as any structs or enums annotated with #[derive(Serialize)].

Performance

It is fast. You should expect in the ballpark of 500 to 1000 megabytes per second deserialization and 600 to 900 megabytes per second serialization, depending on the characteristics of your data. This is competitive with the fastest C and C++ JSON libraries or even 30% faster for many use cases. Benchmarks live in the serde-rs/json-benchmark repo.

Getting help

Serde is one of the most widely used Rust libraries, so any place that Rustaceans congregate will be able to help you out. For chat, consider trying the #rust-questions or #rust-beginners channels of the unofficial community Discord (invite: https://discord.gg/rust-lang-community), the #rust-usage or #beginners channels of the official Rust Project Discord (invite: https://discord.gg/rust-lang), or the #general stream in Zulip. For asynchronous, consider the [rust] tag on StackOverflow, the /r/rust subreddit which has a pinned weekly easy questions post, or the Rust Discourse forum. It's acceptable to file a support issue in this repo, but they tend not to get as many eyes as any of the above and may get closed without a response after some time.

No-std support

As long as there is a memory allocator, it is possible to use serde_json without the rest of the Rust standard library. This is supported on Rust 1.36+. Disable the default "std" feature and enable the "alloc" feature:

[dependencies]
serde_json = { version = "1.0", default-features = false, features = ["alloc"] }

For JSON support in Serde without a memory allocator, please see the serde-json-core crate.

Link: https://crates.io/crates/serde_json

#rust  #rustlang  #encode   #json 

Nico Jonsson

Nico Jonsson

1605576444

How to Use DOM Manipulation properly in Angular

If you are coming from the background of working with angularjs, it was quite straight forward to access and manipulate the DOM there. You had access to the DOM node through element injected in the link function of the directive.

function link(scope, element, attrs) {
}

Or through angular.element which was an AngularJS’s built in subset of jQuery. But this approach had its drawbacks. It made your code tightly coupled with Browser’s API.

The new Angular (2 onwards) works on multiple platforms: mobile, web workers etc. So, they have introduced a number of APIs to work as an abstraction layer between your code and platform APIs. These APIs come in the form of different reference types likeElementRef, TemplateRef, ViewRef, ComponentRef and ViewContainerRef.

In this blog, we will see some examples of how these reference types can be used to manipulate DOM in angular. But before that let’s look at the ways to access these reference types within a Component/Directive.

DOM Queries

Angular has provided two ways to query/access various reference types within a Component/Directive. These are

  • ViewChild/ViewChildren
  • ContentChild/ContentChildren

ViewChild/ViewChildren

These are decorators which can be used within a Component/Directive as @ViewChild (returns a single reference) or @ViewChildren (returns a list of references in the form of a QueryList). These will assign the values of reference types from template to the component fields they are applied to. The basic usage is as follow:

@ViewChild(selector, {read: ReferenceType}) fieldName;

A selector can be a string representing a template reference variable, or a Component/Directive class, or a TemplateRef or a provider defined in the child component tree.

@ViewChild("myElem") template: ElementRef;

The second parameter is optional and is only required to query some reference types which can’t be inferred easily by Angular like ViewContainerRef.

@ViewChild("myContainer", {read: ViewContainerRef}) container: ViewContainerRef;

ContentChild/ContentChildren

The usage is pretty much similar to that of ViewChild/ViewChildren. The only difference is that it queries within the <ng-content> projected elements of the component while the @ViewChild queries within the template of the component. This will be explained better in the examples of upcoming sections.

DOM access via ElementRef

ElementRef is a very basic abstraction layer on a DOM element in Angular. It’s an angular wrapper around the native element.

You can get hold of ElementRef in a Component or Directive in following ways:

Dependency Injection

Host element of a Component or Directive can be accessed via direct DI in the constructor.

@Component({
  selector: 'app-test',
  template: '<div>I am a test component</div>'
})
export class TestComponent implements OnInit {

  constructor(private element: ElementRef) { }

  ngOnInit() {
    console.log(this.element.nativeElement);
  }

}
/*
* Output: 
*   <app-test>
*     <div>I am a test component</div>
*   </app-test>
* */

Using ViewChild and Template Reference Variables

@Component({
  selector: 'app-test',
  template: `
    <div #child1>First Child</div>
    <div>Second Child</div>
  `
})
export class TestComponent implements OnInit {

  @ViewChild("child1") firstChild: ElementRef;

  constructor() { }

  ngOnInit() {
    console.log(this.firstChild.nativeElement);
  }

}

/*
* Output: <div>First Child</div>
* */

Using ContentChild

Works in a similar manner as that of @ViewChild, but for <ng-content> projected elements.

// Child Component
@Component({
  selector: "component-a",
  template: `<ng-content></ng-content>`
})
export class ComponentA {
  @ContentChild("contentChild") contentChild: ElementRef;
  
  ngOnInit() {
    console.log(this.contentChild.nativeElement);
  }
}
// Parent Component
@Component({
  selector: 'app-test',
  template: `
    <component-a>
      <div #contentChild>Content Child 1</div>
      <div>Content Child 2</div>
    </component-a>
  `
})
export class TestComponent implements OnInit {}
/*
* Output: <div>Content Child 1</div>
* */

It looks pretty straight forward that you can easily access a DOM element via ElementRef and then manipulate the DOM by accessing the nativeElement. Something like this:

@Component({
  selector: 'app-test-component',
  template: `
    <div class="header">I am a header</div>
    <div class="body" #body>
    </div>
    <div class="footer">I am a footer</div>
  `
})
export class TestComponent implements AfterContentInit {
  @ViewChild("body") bodyElem: ElementRef;

  ngAfterContentInit(): void {
    this.bodyElem.nativeElement.innerHTML = `<div>Hi, I am child added by directly calling the native APIs.</div>`;
  }

}

However, the direct usage of ElementRef is discouraged by Angular Team because it directly provides the access to DOM which can make your application vulnerable to XSS attacks. It also creates tight coupling between your application and rendering layers which makes is difficult to run an app on multiple platforms.

Everything is a ‘View’ in Angular

A view is the smallest building block of an angular app’s UI. Every component has its own view. You can consider it as a group of elements which can be created and destroyed together.

A view can be classified into two types:

  • Embedded Views — created from templates
  • Host Views — created from components

Displaying a view in UI can be broken down into two steps:

  1. Creating a view from template or component
  2. Rendering a view into a view container

Embedded Views

Embedded views are created from templates defined using <ng-template> element.

Creating an embedded view

First a template needs to be accessed within a component as TemplateRefusing @ViewChild and template reference variable. Then, an embedded view can be created from a TemplateRef by passing a data-binding context.

const viewRef = this.template.createEmbeddedView({
  name: "View 1"
});

This context is being consumed by the template in<ng-template>.

<ng-template #template let-viewName="name">
  <div>Hi, My name is {{viewName}}. I am a view created from a template</div>
</ng-template>

You can also use the $implicit property in the context if you have only a single property to bind.

const viewRef = this.template.createEmbeddedView({
  $implicit: "View 1"
});

In this case, you can skip assigning values to template variables.

<ng-template #template let-viewName>
  <div>Hi, My name is {{viewName}}. I am a view created from a template</div>
</ng-template>

Rendering an embedded view

Till now, we have created only an instance of ViewRef. This view is still not visible in the UI. In order to see it in the UI, we need a placeholder (a view container) to render it. This placeholder is being provided by ViewContainerRef.

Any element can serve as a view container, however <ng-container> is a better candidate as it is rendered as a comment and doesn’t leave any redundant element in the html DOM.

@Component({
  selector: 'app-test-component',
  template: `
    <div class="header">I am a header</div>
    <div class="body">
      <ng-container #container></ng-container>
    </div>
    <div class="footer">I am a footer</div>

    <ng-template #template let-viewName="name">
      <div>Hi, My name is {{viewName}}. I am a view created from a template</div>
    </ng-template>
  `,
})
export class TestComponent implements AfterContentInit {

  @ViewChild("template") template: TemplateRef;
  @ViewChild("container", {read: ViewContainerRef}) container: ViewContainerRef;

  constructor() { }

  ngAfterContentInit(): void {
    const viewRef = this.template.createEmbeddedView({
      name: "View 1"
    });
    this.container.insert(viewRef);
  }
}

Both <ng-container> and <ng-template> elements will be rendered as comments leaving the html DOM neat and clean.

The above 2 steps process of creating a view and adding it into a container can further be reduced by using the createEmbeddedView method available in the ViewContainerRef itself.

this.container.createEmbeddedView(this.template, {
  name: "View 1"
});

This can be further simplified by moving the whole view creation logic from component class to the template using ngTemplateOutlet and ngTemplateOutletContext.

@Component({
  selector: 'app-test-component',
  template: `
    <div class="header">I am a header</div>
    <div class="body">
      <ng-container [ngTemplateOutlet]="template" [ngTemplateOutletContext]="{name: 'View 1'}"></ng-container>
    </div>
    <div class="footer">I am a footer</div>

    <ng-template #template let-viewName="name">
      <div>Hi, My name is {{viewName}}. I am a view created from a template</div>
    </ng-template>
  `
})
export class TestComponent {}

Host Views

Host Views are quite similar to Embedded View. The only difference is that the Host Views are created from components instead of templates.

Creating a host view

In order to create a host view, first you need to create a ComponentFactory of the component you want to render using ComponentFactoryResolver.

constructor(
  private componentFactoryResolver: ComponentFactoryResolver
) {
  this.someComponentFactory = this.componentFactoryResolver.resolveComponentFactory(SomeComponent);
}

Then, a dynamic instance of the component is created by passing an Injector instance to the factory. Every component should be bound to an instance of Injector. You can use the injector of the parent component for the dynamically created components.

const componentRef = this.someComponentFactory.create(this.injector);
const viewRef = componentRef.hostView;

Rendering a host view

Rendering a host view is almost similar to rendering an embedded view. You can directly insert it into a view container.

@Component({
  selector: 'app-test-component',
  template: `
    <div class="header">I am a header</div>
    <div class="body">
      <ng-container #container></ng-container>
    </div>
    <div class="footer">I am a footer</div>
  `,
})
export class TestComponentComponent implements AfterContentInit {

  @ViewChild("container", {read: ViewContainerRef}) container: ViewContainerRef;

  private someComponentFactory: ComponentFactory<SomeComponent>;

  constructor(
    private componentFactoryResolver: ComponentFactoryResolver,
    private injector: Injector
  ) {
    this.someComponentFactory = this.componentFactoryResolver.resolveComponentFactory(SomeComponent);
  }

  ngAfterContentInit(): void {
    const componentRef = this.someComponentFactory.create(this.injector);
    const viewRef = componentRef.hostView;
    this.container.insert(viewRef);
  }
}

Or by directly calling the createComponent method of ViewContainerRef and passing the component factory instance.

this.container.createComponent(this.someComponentFactory);

Now, similar to embedded view, we can also shift the whole logic of host view creation in template itself using ngComponentOutlet.

@Component({
  selector: 'app-test-component',
  template: `
    <div class="header">I am a header</div>
    <div class="body">
      <ng-container [ngComponentOutlet]="comp"></ng-container>
    </div>
    <div class="footer">I am a footer</div>
  `
})
export class TestComponent {
  comp = SomeComponent;
}

Don’t forget to store the reference of the component class in parent component’s field. The template has access only to the fields of the components.

Summary

Here we come to an end. Let’s conclude what we have understood till now.

  • We can access the DOM in Angular using different reference types likeElementRef, TemplateRef, ViewRef, ComponentRef and ViewContainerRef.
  • These reference types can be queried from templates using @ViewChild and @ContentChild.
  • Browser’s native DOM element can be accessed via ElementRef. However, manipulating this element directly is discouraged because of security reasons.
  • Concept of Views.
  • How to create and render an Embedded View.
  • How to create and render a Component View.

So, that’s it for today about understanding DOM manipulation in Angular.

Originally published by medium

Rust Lang Course For Beginner In 2021: Guessing Game

 What we learn in this chapter:
- Rust number types and their default
- First exposure to #Rust modules and the std::io module to read input from the terminal
- Rust Variable Shadowing
- Rust Loop keyword
- Rust if/else
- First exposure to #Rust match keyword

=== Content:
00:00 - Intro & Setup
02:11 - The Plan
03:04 - Variable Secret
04:03 - Number Types
05:45 - Mutability recap
06:22 - Ask the user
07:45 - First intro to module std::io
08:29 - Rust naming conventions
09:22 - Read user input io:stdin().read_line(&mut guess)
12:46 - Break & Understand
14:20 - Parse string to number
17:10 - Variable Shadowing
18:46 - If / Else - You Win, You Loose
19:28 - Loop
20:38 - Match
23:19 - Random with rand
26:35 - Run it all
27:09 - Conclusion and next episode

#rust 

Mary  Turcotte

Mary Turcotte

1665889560

Foundry Rust Monorepo Template

Foundry Rust Monorepo Template  

Template for quickly getting started with developing Rust applications that leverage Foundry for EVM smart contract development.

Continuous Integration is already set up to test both your Rust and Solidity code, as well as ensure formatting and that your Rust bindings match the Solidity build artifacts.

Directory Structure

The project is structured as a mixed Rust workspace with a Foundry project under contracts/ and typesafe auto-generated bindings to the contracts under bindings/.

├── Cargo.toml
├── app // <-- Your Rust application logic
├── contracts // <- The smart contracts + tests using Foundry
├── bindings // <-- Generated bindings to the smart contracts' abis (like Typechain)

Testing

Given the repository contains both Solidity and Rust code, there's 2 different workflows.

Solidity

Forge is using submodules to manage dependencies. Initialize the dependencies:

forge install

If you are in the root directory of the project, run:

forge test --root ./contracts

If you are in in contracts/:

forge test

Rust

cargo test

Generating Rust bindings to the contracts

Rust bindings to the contracts can be generated via forge bind, which requires first building your contracts:

forge build --root ./contracts
forge bind --bindings-path ./bindings --root ./contracts --crate-name bindings

Any follow-on calls to forge bind will check that the generated bindings match the ones under the build files. If you want to re-generate your bindings, pass the --overwrite flag to your forge bind command.

Installing Foundry

First run the command below to get foundryup, the Foundry toolchain installer:

curl -L https://foundry.paradigm.xyz | bash

Then, in a new terminal session or after reloading your PATH, run it to get the latest forge and cast binaries:

foundryup

For more, see the official docs.


Download Details:

Author: gakonst
Source Code: https://github.com/gakonst/foundry-rust-template

#rust