Enos  Prosacco

Enos Prosacco

1591334400

Angular CLI: camelCase or kebab-case

Angular CLI: camelCase or kebab-case
Should Angular CLI options be in camel case or in kebab case?

Angular CLI supports options for commands. For example: ng build --prod

But, for these options should we use camelCase or kebab-case? Well, it turns out that the Angular CLI documentation is rather ambiguous about how you should write these command line options.

#javascript #angular #angular-cli #camel-case #js

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Angular CLI: camelCase or kebab-case
Christa  Stehr

Christa Stehr

1598940617

Install Angular - Angular Environment Setup Process

Angular is a TypeScript based framework that works in synchronization with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. To work with angular, domain knowledge of these 3 is required.

  1. Installing Node.js and npm
  2. Installing Angular CLI
  3. Creating workspace
  4. Deploying your First App

In this article, you will get to know about the Angular Environment setup process. After reading this article, you will be able to install, setup, create, and launch your own application in Angular. So let’s start!!!

Angular environment setup

Install Angular in Easy Steps

For Installing Angular on your Machine, there are 2 prerequisites:

  • Node.js
  • npm Package Manager
Node.js

First you need to have Node.js installed as Angular require current, active LTS or maintenance LTS version of Node.js

Download and Install Node.js version suitable for your machine’s operating system.

Npm Package Manager

Angular, Angular CLI and Angular applications are dependent on npm packages. By installing Node.js, you have automatically installed the npm Package manager which will be the base for installing angular in your system. To check the presence of npm client and Angular version check of npm client, run this command:

  1. npm -v

Installing Angular CLI

  • Open Terminal/Command Prompt
  • To install Angular CLI, run the below command:
  1. npm install -g @angular/cli

installing angular CLI

· After executing the command, Angular CLI will get installed within some time. You can check it using the following command

  1. ng --version

Workspace Creation

Now as your Angular CLI is installed, you need to create a workspace to work upon your application. Methods for it are:

  • Using CLI
  • Using Visual Studio Code
1. Using CLI

To create a workspace:

  • Navigate to the desired directory where you want to create your workspace using cd command in the Terminal/Command prompt
  • Then in the directory write this command on your terminal and provide the name of the app which you want to create. In my case I have mentioned DataFlair:
  1. Ng new YourAppName

create angular workspace

  • After running this command, it will prompt you to select from various options about the CSS and other functionalities.

angular CSS options

  • To leave everything to default, simply press the Enter or the Return key.

angular setup

#angular tutorials #angular cli install #angular environment setup #angular version check #download angular #install angular #install angular cli

Enos  Prosacco

Enos Prosacco

1591334400

Angular CLI: camelCase or kebab-case

Angular CLI: camelCase or kebab-case
Should Angular CLI options be in camel case or in kebab case?

Angular CLI supports options for commands. For example: ng build --prod

But, for these options should we use camelCase or kebab-case? Well, it turns out that the Angular CLI documentation is rather ambiguous about how you should write these command line options.

#javascript #angular #angular-cli #camel-case #js

Ayyaz Zafar

1624138795

Angular Material Autocomplete - Multiple Use Cases covered

Learn How to use Angular Material Autocomplete Suggestions Search Input. I covered multiple use cases.

Please watch this video. I hope this video would be helpful for you to understand it and use it in your projects

Please subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL5nKCmpReJZZMe9_bYR89w

#angular #angular-material #angular-js #autocomplete #angular-material-autocomplete #angular-tutorial

Roberta  Ward

Roberta Ward

1593061105

Tutorial: Nx-style monorepo workspace with Angular CLI: Part 2

In Part 1 of this tutorial, we set up the booking desktop application project, a project for its end-to-end test suite, and the booking feature shell workspace library.

In this part, we’ll set up our custom generate project tool to automate the steps we did manually in Part 1. We’ll use it to create the shared and booking data acess libraries with NgRx Store, NgRx Effects, NgRx Schematics, and NgRx Store DevTools.

To configure the data access libraries while keeping the flow of dependencies correct, we’ll extract a shared environments library. Data access will be hooked up to the booking feature shell library.

#angular #angular-cli #angular-workspace #monorepo #nx #series-angular-architectural-patterns #ngrx

Roberta  Ward

Roberta Ward

1595337024

Tutorial: Nx-style monorepo workspace with Angular CLI: Part 3

In Part 3 of this tutorial, we create the passenger info and flight search feature libraries. We use the generate project tool to create the mobile booking application and its test project. Finally, we create a mobile version of the flight search component template.

This tutorial is part of the Angular Architectural Patterns series.

In Part 2 of this tutorial, we used the generate project tool to generate the booking data access and shared data access workspace libraries with NgRx Store and Effects. We extracted a shared environments library and hooked everything up to the booking feature shell library.

In this part of the tutorial, we’re going to create the passenger info and flight search feature libraries, each with a routed component. After that, we’ll create the mobile booking application project and its end-to-end test project. Finally, we’ll use builder file replacement to create a mobile version of the flight search component template.

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Passenger info feature library#

Let’s create our first feature library, the passenger info feature which is part of the booking domain.

npm run generate-project -- library feature feature-passenger-info --scope=booking --npm-scope=nrwl-airlines
# or
yarn generate-project library feature feature-passenger-info --scope=booking --npm-scope=nrwl-airlines
<>

Generate passenger info feature library.

After generating the project using the previous commands and parameters, we get this file and folder structure.

libs/booking/feature-passenger-info
├── src
│   ├── lib
│   │   ├── passenger-info
│   │   │   ├── passenger-info.component.css
│   │   │   ├── passenger-info.component.html
│   │   │   ├── passenger-info.component.spec.ts
│   │   │   └── passenger-info.component.ts
│   │   ├── booking-feature-passenger-info.module.spec.ts
│   │   └── booking-feature-passenger-info.module.ts
│   ├── index.ts
│   └── test.ts
├── README.md
├── karma.conf.js
├── tsconfig.lib.json
├── tsconfig.spec.json
└── tslint.json
<>

The file and folder structure of the booking passenger info feature library.

This looks a little different from a feature shell library and a data access library.

After the generate project tool has created the workspace library with an entry point Angular module, it runs the commands in the next listing.

The generate project tool also removed the --no-common-module flag from the ng generate module command we saw earlier, since this Angular module will be declaring components.

ng generate component passenger-info --project=booking-feature-passenger-info --module=booking-feature-passenger-info.module.ts --display-block
<>

Generate component command run when generating a feature library.

Let’s look at the Angular module our tool has generated.

// booking-feature-passenger-info.module.ts
import { CommonModule } from '@angular/common';
import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';

import {
  PassengerInfoComponent,
} from './passenger-info/passenger-info.component';

@NgModule({
  declarations: [PassengerInfoComponent],
  imports: [
    CommonModule,
  ],
})
export class BookingFeaturePassengerInfoModule {}
<>

Initial entry point Angular module in the passenger info feature library.

The entry point Angular module shown in the previous listing is a good starting point. We need to set up the feature routing for our component though. This is done in the next listing.

// booking-feature-passenger-info.module.ts
import { CommonModule } from '@angular/common';
import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';
import { RouterModule, Routes } from '@angular/router';

import {
  PassengerInfoComponent,
} from './passenger-info/passenger-info.component';

const routes: Routes = [
  {
    path: '',
    pathMatch: 'full',
    component: PassengerInfoComponent,
  },
];

@NgModule({
  declarations: [PassengerInfoComponent],
  imports: [
    RouterModule.forChild(routes),
    CommonModule,
  ],
})
export class BookingFeaturePassengerInfoModule {}
<>

Passenger info feature Angular module with route configuration for its entry point component.

Nice! Now we’ve prepared our feature library to be hooked up to the feature shell library’s routing configuration.

The generated component is what you’d expect. What it’d display in a real booking application is not really important for the purpose of this article.

Let’s hook up this feature to the booking application’s routing by adding a route configuration to the booking feature shell Angular module as seen here.

#angular #angular-cli #angular-workspace #monorepo #nx #series-angular-architectural-patterns